H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Genetics and Molecular Biology H-index 65 Citations 16,251 148 World Ranking 1914 National Ranking 970

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2008 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • World War II
  • DNA

Genetics, DNA replication, Chromatin, Origin recognition complex and Replication timing are his primary areas of study. Particularly relevant to Licensing factor is his body of work in Genetics. His DNA replication research integrates issues from Molecular biology, Replicon, Chinese hamster ovary cell and Replication protein A.

His studies deal with areas such as Epigenomics, Computational biology and Mitosis as well as Chromatin. The Origin recognition complex study combines topics in areas such as Pre-replication complex, Cell cycle, Control of chromosome duplication and Cell biology. He is studying DNA Replication Timing, which is a component of Replication timing.

His most cited work include:

  • A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome (1022 citations)
  • Topologically associating domains are stable units of replication-timing regulation (567 citations)
  • Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome (520 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

David M. Gilbert mainly focuses on Replication timing, Chromatin, Genetics, DNA replication and Cell biology. David M. Gilbert combines subjects such as Epigenetics, Computational biology and Cellular differentiation with his study of Replication timing. His work carried out in the field of Chromatin brings together such families of science as Human genome, Histone, Chromosome, Chromosome conformation capture and Regulation of gene expression.

His Genetics study typically links adjacent topics like Evolutionary biology. His DNA replication research includes elements of Molecular biology, Cell cycle and Replication. His Cell biology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Transcription and Cohesin.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Replication timing (33.11%)
  • Chromatin (29.77%)
  • Genetics (29.43%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Replication timing (33.11%)
  • Chromatin (29.77%)
  • Genome (17.73%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His scientific interests lie mostly in Replication timing, Chromatin, Genome, Computational biology and Cell biology. DNA replication and Genetics are the focus of his Replication timing studies. His study in Chromatin is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Compartmentalization, Chromosome, Chromosome conformation capture, Histone and DNA sequencing.

His Genome research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Evolutionary biology, Regulation of gene expression and Complement. The study incorporates disciplines such as CRISPR, Annotation, Functional genomics, Genomics and Hidden Markov model in addition to Computational biology. His Cell biology study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as CTCF, Cohesin, Replication and Epigenome.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Expanded encyclopaedias of DNA elements in the human and mouse genomes (141 citations)
  • Integrative detection and analysis of structural variation in cancer genomes (126 citations)
  • Identifying cis Elements for Spatiotemporal Control of Mammalian DNA Replication. (75 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • World War II
  • DNA

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Replication timing, Chromatin, Genome, DNA replication and Computational biology. His Replication timing study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Evolutionary biology and Cell biology. He interconnects Mutation rate, Cellular differentiation, DNA sequencing and Chromosome conformation capture in the investigation of issues within Chromatin.

David M. Gilbert is conducting research in Gene and Genetics as part of his Genome study. The concepts of his DNA replication study are interwoven with issues in Chromosomal fragile site, Cell cycle and Replication. His Computational biology study incorporates themes from Phenotype, DNA Replication Timing, Functional genomics and Phylogenetic tree.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome

Feng Yue;Feng Yue;Yong Cheng;Alessandra Breschi;Jeff Vierstra.
Nature (2014)

1220 Citations

Topologically associating domains are stable units of replication-timing regulation

Benjamin D. Pope;Tyrone Ryba;Vishnu Dileep;Feng Yue.
Nature (2014)

696 Citations

Maintenance of stable heterochromatin domains by dynamic HP1 binding.

Thierry Cheutin;Adrian J. McNairn;Thomas Jenuwein;David M. Gilbert.
Science (2003)

647 Citations

Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

Manolis Kellis;Barbara Wold;Michael P. Snyder;Bradley E. Bernstein.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2014)

624 Citations

Global Reorganization of Replication Domains During Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

Ichiro Hiratani;Tyrone Ryba;Mari Itoh;Tomoki Yokochi.
PLOS Biology (2008)

561 Citations

Evolutionarily conserved replication timing profiles predict long-range chromatin interactions and distinguish closely related cell types

Tyrone Ryba;Ichiro Hiratani;Junjie Lu;Mari Itoh.
Genome Research (2010)

552 Citations

An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE)

John A Stamatoyannopoulos;Michael Snyder;Ross Hardison;Bing Ren.
Genome Biology (2012)

386 Citations

Making Sense of Eukaryotic DNA Replication Origins

David M. Gilbert.
Science (2001)

384 Citations

Activation of mammalian Chk1 during DNA replication arrest: a role for Chk1 in the intra-S phase checkpoint monitoring replication origin firing

Carmen G. Feijoo;Clare Hall-Jackson;Rong Wu;David Jenkins.
Journal of Cell Biology (2001)

364 Citations

The spatial position and replication timing of chromosomal domains are both established in early G1 phase.

Daniela S Dimitrova;David M Gilbert.
Molecular Cell (1999)

363 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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