D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 39 Citations 6,117 90 World Ranking 5058 National Ranking 2897

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2007 - Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA)

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Cognition
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognitive psychology

Her scientific interests lie mostly in Developmental psychology, Perception, Cognition, Cognitive development and Categorization. Her study in Causality extends to Developmental psychology with its themes. Many of her studies on Perception apply to Visual short-term memory as well.

Her Cognition research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Concept learning, Visual perception and Object. The concepts of her Cognitive development study are interwoven with issues in Curiosity, Early childhood and Age differences. Her Categorization study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Cognitive psychology, Chunking, Set, Part of speech and Categorical variable.

Her most cited work include:

  • Preschoolers' questions and parents' explanations: Causal thinking in everyday activity. (230 citations)
  • The Development of Visual Short‐Term Memory Capacity in Infants (219 citations)
  • Infant perception of a causal event (192 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Her primary areas of study are Developmental psychology, Cognitive psychology, Cognition, Categorization and Perception. Her studies in Developmental psychology integrate themes in fields like Visual perception, Audiology, Eye movement and Attentional control. The various areas that Lisa M. Oakes examines in her Cognitive psychology study include Stimulus and Short-term memory, Visual short-term memory, Memory rehearsal.

Her studies deal with areas such as Concept learning and Object as well as Cognition. Her Categorization research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Habituation, Categorical variable, Visual recognition and Set. Her research investigates the connection between Perception and topics such as Causality that intersect with issues in Event and Attribution.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Developmental psychology (44.07%)
  • Cognitive psychology (42.37%)
  • Cognition (30.51%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Cognitive psychology (42.37%)
  • Developmental psychology (44.07%)
  • Stimulus (9.32%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Lisa M. Oakes spends much of her time researching Cognitive psychology, Developmental psychology, Stimulus, Visual short-term memory and Eye movement. Her Cognitive psychology research integrates issues from Sample and Preference. Her research integrates issues of Cognition and Face perception in her study of Developmental psychology.

Her work on Cognitive development and Neurocognitive as part of her general Cognition study is frequently connected to Potential effect and Large sample, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science. As a member of one scientific family, she mostly works in the field of Visual short-term memory, focusing on Eye tracking and, on occasion, Object, Speech recognition, Communication and Change detection. The Eye movement study combines topics in areas such as Visual perception, Short-term memory and Visual attention.

Between 2016 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Sample size, statistical power, and false conclusions in infant looking-time research. (72 citations)
  • Scanning of own- versus other-race faces in infants from racially diverse or homogenous communities. (37 citations)
  • Plasticity may change inputs as well as processes, structures, and responses. (31 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Cognition
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognitive psychology

Her primary areas of investigation include Variable, Stimulus, Cognitive psychology, Developmental psychology and Sample size determination. Combining a variety of fields, including Variable, Object, Emotional development, Learning problem, Categorization and Perception, are what the author presents in her essays. Her work deals with themes such as Human–computer interaction and Infant development, which intersect with Stimulus.

Lisa M. Oakes interconnects Neuroplasticity, Neuroscience and Eye movement in the investigation of issues within Cognitive psychology. Her Developmental psychology research incorporates themes from Face scanning and Face perception. Her Sample size determination study is related to the wider topic of Statistics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Preschoolers' questions and parents' explanations: Causal thinking in everyday activity.

Maureen A. Callanan;Lisa M. Oakes.
Cognitive Development (1992)

452 Citations

Infant perception of a causal event

Lisa M. Oakes;Leslie B. Cohen.
Cognitive Development (1990)

331 Citations

The Development of Visual Short‐Term Memory Capacity in Infants

Shannon Ross‐sheehy;Lisa M. Oakes;Steven J. Luck.
Child Development (2003)

315 Citations

How infants perceive a simple causal event

Leslie B. Cohen;Lisa M. Oakes.
Developmental Psychology (1993)

278 Citations

Integrating Language and Gesture in Infancy.

Elizabeth Bates;Donna Thal;Kimberly Whitesell;Larry Fenson.
Developmental Psychology (1989)

271 Citations

Making Sense of Infant Categorization: Stable Processes and Changing Representations☆☆☆

Kelly L. Madole;Lisa M. Oakes.
Developmental Review (1999)

217 Citations

Early Category and Concept Development: Making Sense of the Blooming, Buzzing Confusion

David H. Rakison;Lisa M. Oakes.
(2008)

193 Citations

Development of Infants' Use of Continuity Cues in Their Perception of Causality.

Lisa M. Oakes.
Developmental Psychology (1994)

185 Citations

Infants' object examining: Habituation and categorization ☆ ☆☆

Lisa M Oakes;Kelly L Madole;Leslie B Cohen.
Cognitive Development (1991)

182 Citations

Language and hand preference in early development

Elizabeth Bates;Barbara O'Connell;Jyotsna Vaid;Paul Sledge.
Developmental Neuropsychology (1986)

172 Citations

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