H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Medicine H-index 113 Citations 36,494 359 World Ranking 2156 National Ranking 28

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Enzyme
  • Gene

His primary scientific interests are in Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Skeletal muscle, Glucose uptake and Glycogen. His research in Internal medicine intersects with topics in AMPK and Protein kinase A. His study in Glycogen synthase, Carbohydrate metabolism, GLUT4, Muscle contraction and Physical exercise are all subfields of Endocrinology.

His Skeletal muscle research includes elements of Myocyte, Stimulation and Biochemistry, Metabolism. Erik A. Richter has researched Glucose uptake in several fields, including Caffeine, Glucose homeostasis and Fatty acid. His research integrates issues of Vastus lateralis muscle, Gastrocnemius muscle, Carbohydrate and Femoral artery in his study of Glycogen.

His most cited work include:

  • Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake (561 citations)
  • Knockout of the α2 but Not α1 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase Isoform Abolishes 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranosidebut Not Contraction-induced Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle (503 citations)
  • The AMP-activated protein kinase α2 catalytic subunit controls whole-body insulin sensitivity (451 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Skeletal muscle, Insulin and Glucose uptake. His Internal medicine study frequently links to other fields, such as Protein kinase A. His research on Endocrinology often connects related areas such as AMPK.

His Skeletal muscle study incorporates themes from Cell biology, Biochemistry, Phosphorylation, Metabolism and GLUT4. His Insulin research incorporates elements of Diabetes mellitus and Protein kinase B. His Glucose uptake research integrates issues from Glycolysis, Perfusion and Glucose homeostasis.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Internal medicine (83.22%)
  • Endocrinology (81.84%)
  • Skeletal muscle (55.40%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Internal medicine (83.22%)
  • Endocrinology (81.84%)
  • Skeletal muscle (55.40%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Erik A. Richter mainly focuses on Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Skeletal muscle, Glucose uptake and Insulin. His research in Internal medicine focuses on subjects like Type 2 diabetes, which are connected to Obesity and Weight loss. His Endocrinology study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as AMPK and Protein kinase B.

His study in Skeletal muscle is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Glucose transporter, Metabolism, Muscle contraction and Cell biology. His Glucose uptake research incorporates themes from Insulin signalling, Leukemia inhibitory factor, Exercise physiology and Perfusion. His Insulin research includes themes of Glycolysis and Vasodilation.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake (561 citations)
  • Global Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Human Skeletal Muscle Reveals a Network of Exercise-Regulated Kinases and AMPK Substrates (190 citations)
  • Early Enhancements of Hepatic and Later of Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity Combined With Increased Postprandial Insulin Secretion Contribute to Improved Glycemic Control After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (171 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Gene
  • Enzyme

His scientific interests lie mostly in Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Skeletal muscle, Glucose uptake and AMPK. As a part of the same scientific study, he usually deals with the Internal medicine, concentrating on Protein kinase B and frequently concerns with PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. He combines subjects such as mTORC1, Femoral artery and Fatty acid with his study of Endocrinology.

The concepts of his Skeletal muscle study are interwoven with issues in Exercise physiology, mTORC2, Biochemistry, Muscle contraction and Glucose transporter. His Glucose uptake research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Glycogen and Metabolism. His studies in AMPK integrate themes in fields like Lipid metabolism and Stimulation.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake

Erik A. Richter;Mark Hargreaves.
Physiological Reviews (2013)

928 Citations

Timing of postexercise protein intake is important for muscle hypertrophy with resistance training in elderly humans

B. Esmarck;J.L. Andersen;S. Olsen;Erik A. Richter.
The Journal of Physiology (2001)

855 Citations

Knockout of the α2 but Not α1 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase Isoform Abolishes 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranosidebut Not Contraction-induced Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

Sebastian B. Jørgensen;Benoit Viollet;Fabrizio Andreelli;Christian Frøsig.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004)

773 Citations

The AMP-activated protein kinase α2 catalytic subunit controls whole-body insulin sensitivity

Benoit Viollet;Fabrizio Andreelli;Sebastian B. Jørgensen;Christophe Perrin.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (2003)

584 Citations

Muscle Glucose Metabolism following Exercise in the Rat: INCREASED SENSITIVITY TO INSULIN

Erik A. Richter;Lawrence P. Garetto;Michael N. Goodman;Neil B. Ruderman.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (1982)

572 Citations

Isoform-specific and exercise intensity-dependent activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in human skeletal muscle.

Jørgen F. P. Wojtaszewski;Pernille Nielsen;Bo F. Hansen;Erik A. Richter.
The Journal of Physiology (2000)

485 Citations

AMPK and the biochemistry of exercise: Implications for human health and disease

Erik A. Richter;Neil B. Ruderman.
Biochemical Journal (2009)

433 Citations

Insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity after exercise in human skeletal muscle.

J F Wojtaszewski;B F Hansen;Gade;B Kiens.
Diabetes (2000)

423 Citations

Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise : How is it regulated?

Adam J. Rose;Erik A. Richter.
Physiology (2005)

412 Citations

Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

E. A. Richter;K. J. Mikines;H. Galbo;B. Kiens.
Journal of Applied Physiology (1989)

409 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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