H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 123 Citations 53,501 383 World Ranking 111 National Ranking 68

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

1989 - Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Psychiatry
  • Internal medicine
  • Developmental psychology

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Psychiatry, Developmental psychology, El Niño and Clinical psychology are his primary areas of study. His work on Methylphenidate as part of general Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder research is frequently linked to Longitudinal study, thereby connecting diverse disciplines of science. His Psychosocial, Impulsivity, Substance abuse and Psychopathology study in the realm of Psychiatry connects with subjects such as Context.

The Academic achievement and Psychometrics research William E. Pelham does as part of his general Developmental psychology study is frequently linked to other disciplines of science, such as Social environment and Injury prevention, therefore creating a link between diverse domains of science. His El Niño research integrates issues from Treatment outcome and Oppositional defiant. His research in Clinical psychology intersects with topics in Intervention and Cognition.

His most cited work include:

  • Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (1233 citations)
  • Teacher Ratings of DSM-III-R Symptoms for the Disruptive Behavior Disorders (1069 citations)
  • Clinical relevance of the primary findings of the MTA: success rates based on severity of ADHD and ODD symptoms at the end of treatment. (804 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

William E. Pelham spends much of his time researching Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Developmental psychology, Clinical psychology, Psychiatry and Methylphenidate. His Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder study combines topics in areas such as Stimulant, Conduct disorder, Young adult, El Niño and Randomized controlled trial. His Randomized controlled trial study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Clinical trial and Pediatrics.

His Developmental psychology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Social relation, Attribution and Cognition. The various areas that William E. Pelham examines in his Clinical psychology study include Psychological intervention, Intervention, Parent training, Behavioral treatment and Depression. All of his Psychiatry and Psychosocial, Comorbidity, Mental health, Substance abuse and Impulsivity investigations are sub-components of the entire Psychiatry study.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (54.74%)
  • Developmental psychology (41.23%)
  • Clinical psychology (37.91%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2014-2021)?

  • Clinical psychology (37.91%)
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (54.74%)
  • Psychiatry (34.60%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Clinical psychology, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Psychiatry, Developmental psychology and Psychological intervention. The study incorporates disciplines such as Young adult, Mental health, Parent training and Depression in addition to Clinical psychology. His research on Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder also deals with topics like

  • Stimulant together with Randomized controlled trial,
  • Conduct disorder which intersects with area such as Callous unemotional.

His work in the fields of Psychiatry, such as Mood, intersects with other areas such as Injury prevention, Clinical Practice and Guideline. His study in Developmental psychology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Psychopathology, Response inhibition and Public health. His Methylphenidate research includes elements of Working memory, Cognition, Continuous performance task and Reinforcement.

Between 2014 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Functional Adult Outcomes 16 Years After Childhood Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: MTA Results. (124 citations)
  • Young adult outcomes in the follow‐up of the multimodal treatment study of attention‐deficit/hyperactivity disorder: symptom persistence, source discrepancy, and height suppression (117 citations)
  • Treatment Sequencing for Childhood ADHD: A Multiple-Randomization Study of Adaptive Medication and Behavioral Interventions (100 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Psychiatry
  • Cognition

His primary scientific interests are in Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Psychiatry, Clinical psychology, Developmental psychology and Young adult. His Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Stimulant, Psychosocial, Conduct disorder, Neurodevelopmental disorder and Reward sensitivity. The concepts of his Psychiatry study are interwoven with issues in Persistence and Randomized controlled trial.

The Clinical psychology study combines topics in areas such as Mental health, Parent training, Early childhood and Comorbidity. His research integrates issues of Intervention, Psychopathology, Distress and Attention deficit in his study of Developmental psychology. His Young adult research focuses on Symptom persistence and how it relates to DSM-5, Pediatrics and Observational study.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Steven Pliszka;William Bernet;Oscar Bukstein;Heather J. Walter.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2007)

1593 Citations

Teacher Ratings of DSM-III-R Symptoms for the Disruptive Behavior Disorders

William E. Pelham;Elizabeth M. Gnagy;Karen E. Greenslade;Richard Milich.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (1992)

1458 Citations

The Development and Validation of the Children’s Hope Scale

C. R. Snyder;Betsy Hoza;William E. Pelham;Michael Rapoff.
Journal of Pediatric Psychology (1997)

1439 Citations

ADHD Comorbidity Findings From the MTA Study: Comparing Comorbid Subgroups

Peter S. Jensen;Stephen P. Hinshaw;Helena C. Kraemer;Nilantha Lenora.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2001)

1251 Citations

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

William E. Pelham;Gregory A. Fabiano.
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (2008)

1171 Citations

Clinical relevance of the primary findings of the MTA: success rates based on severity of ADHD and ODD symptoms at the end of treatment.

James M. Swanson;Helena C. Kraemer;Stephen P. Hinshaw;L. Eugene Arnold.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2001)

1118 Citations

Empirically supported psychosocial treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

William E. Pelham;Trilby Wheeler;Andrea Chronis.
Journal of Clinical Child Psychology (1998)

1088 Citations

Childhood predictors of adolescent substance use in a longitudinal study of children with ADHD.

Brooke S. G. Molina;William E. Pelham.
Journal of Abnormal Psychology (2003)

932 Citations

Evidence-based assessment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents.

William E. Pelham;Gregory A. Fabiano;Greta M. Massetti.
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (2005)

889 Citations

3-Year Follow-up of the NIMH MTA Study

Peter S. Jensen;L. Eugene Arnold;James M. Swanson;Benedetto Vitiello.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2007)

840 Citations

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