D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines.

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Environmental Sciences D-index 41 Citations 12,725 72 World Ranking 3700 National Ranking 1551

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Meteorology
  • Thunderstorm
  • Astronomy

Morris L. Weisman focuses on Meteorology, Convection, Squall line, Bow echo and Mesoscale meteorology. His study on Weather Research and Forecasting Model, Hodograph and Mesoscale convective system is often connected to Shear as part of broader study in Meteorology. Convection is a subfield of Mechanics that Morris L. Weisman explores.

His work carried out in the field of Bow echo brings together such families of science as Squall, Rear-inflow jet, Mesovortices and Geophysics. His Squall research incorporates themes from Level of free convection and Mesoscale convective complex. Morris L. Weisman focuses mostly in the field of Mesoscale meteorology, narrowing it down to matters related to Atmospheric convection and, in some cases, Grid pattern, Computer simulation, Severe weather and Forcing.

His most cited work include:

  • A Theory for Strong, Long-Lived Squall Lines (979 citations)
  • The Dependence of Numerically Simulated Convective Storms on Vertical Wind Shear and Buoyancy (888 citations)
  • The resolution dependence of explicitly modeled convective systems (517 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Morris L. Weisman mostly deals with Meteorology, Environmental science, Mesoscale meteorology, Convection and Weather Research and Forecasting Model. In his work, Data assimilation is strongly intertwined with Climatology, which is a subfield of Meteorology. Vortex and Mesovortices is closely connected to Geophysics in his research, which is encompassed under the umbrella topic of Mesoscale meteorology.

His work is dedicated to discovering how Convection, Atmospheric sciences are connected with Magnitude and other disciplines. His studies deal with areas such as Forecast skill and Derecho as well as Weather Research and Forecasting Model. He combines subjects such as Atmospheric convection, Leading edge and Mesoscale convective complex with his study of Squall line.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Meteorology (72.00%)
  • Environmental science (37.33%)
  • Mesoscale meteorology (37.33%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2014-2020)?

  • Meteorology (72.00%)
  • Environmental science (37.33%)
  • Convection (34.67%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Meteorology, Environmental science, Convection, Mesoscale meteorology and Climatology. His study brings together the fields of Grid and Meteorology. His study looks at the relationship between Convection and fields such as Atmospheric sciences, as well as how they intersect with chemical problems.

He performs multidisciplinary studies into Mesoscale meteorology and Predictability in his work. His work on North American Mesoscale Model as part of general Climatology research is often related to Consensus forecast, thus linking different fields of science. His Storm research integrates issues from Lightning and Morning.

Between 2014 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Campaign (126 citations)
  • NCAR’s Experimental Real-Time Convection-Allowing Ensemble Prediction System (90 citations)
  • The mesoscale predictability experiment (MPEX) (50 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Meteorology
  • Astronomy
  • Thunderstorm

His primary scientific interests are in Meteorology, Mesoscale meteorology, Convection, Climatology and Ensemble Kalman filter. His work on Convective storm detection and Storm as part of general Meteorology research is frequently linked to Consensus forecast, bridging the gap between disciplines. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Atmospheric research and IOPS.

His study in Storm is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Thunderstorm, Free convective layer, Convective available potential energy, Atmospheric sciences and Outflow. Morris L. Weisman applies his multidisciplinary studies on Climatology and Environmental science in his research. His studies in Acceleration integrate themes in fields like Severe weather and Ensemble prediction.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

A Theory for Strong, Long-Lived Squall Lines

Richard Rotunno;Joseph B. Klemp;Morris L. Weisman.
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (1988)

1632 Citations

The Dependence of Numerically Simulated Convective Storms on Vertical Wind Shear and Buoyancy

M. L. Weisman;J. B. Klemp.
Monthly Weather Review (1982)

1492 Citations

The resolution dependence of explicitly modeled convective systems

Morris L. Weisman;William C. Skamarock;Joseph B. Klemp.
Monthly Weather Review (1997)

856 Citations

The structure and classification of numerically simulated convective storms in directionally varying wind shears

Morris L. Weisman;Joseph B. Klemp.
Monthly Weather Review (1984)

655 Citations

The next generation of NWP: explicit forecasts of convection using the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model

James Done;Christopher A. Davis;Morris Weisman.
Atmospheric Science Letters (2004)

527 Citations

Experiences with 0–36-h Explicit Convective Forecasts with the WRF-ARW Model

Morris L. Weisman;Christopher Davis;Wei Wang;Kevin W. Manning.
Weather and Forecasting (2008)

524 Citations

Some Practical Considerations Regarding Horizontal Resolution in the First Generation of Operational Convection-Allowing NWP

John S. Kain;Steven J. Weiss;David R. Bright;Michael E. Baldwin.
Weather and Forecasting (2008)

511 Citations

“A Theory for Strong Long-Lived Squall Lines” Revisited

Morris L. Weisman;Richard Rotunno.
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (2004)

455 Citations

Predicting Supercell Motion Using a New Hodograph Technique

Matthew J. Bunkers;Brian A. Klimowski;Jon W. Zeitler;Richard L. Thompson.
Weather and Forecasting (2000)

389 Citations

Structure and Evolution of Numerically Simulated Squall Lines

Morris L. Weisman;Joseph B. Klemp;Richard Rotunno.
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (1988)

381 Citations

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