H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 99 Citations 46,870 205 World Ranking 274 National Ranking 166
Psychology D-index 104 Citations 49,919 222 World Ranking 284 National Ranking 184

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2010 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2008 - William James Fellow Award, Association for Psychological Science (APA)

2006 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

1995 - Fellow of John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation

1992 - Troland Research Awards, United States National Academy of Sciences For her rigorous empirical and theoretical analysis of visual cognition, in which understanding of normal function and analysis of neurological deficits illuminate and strengthen one another.

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Law

Martha J. Farah mostly deals with Cognitive psychology, Cognition, Perception, Developmental psychology and Visual perception. Her work deals with themes such as Visual agnosia, Mental image, Representation, Frontal lobe and Semantic memory, which intersect with Cognitive psychology. Her Cognition research includes elements of Cognitive science and Information processing.

Her Perception research includes themes of Facial recognition system, Temporal cortex, Mental representation and Communication. Her study in the field of Child development is also linked to topics like Socioeconomic status. Her study explores the link between Face perception and topics such as Artificial intelligence that cross with problems in Pattern recognition.

Her most cited work include:

  • Parts and wholes in face recognition (1757 citations)
  • Role of left inferior prefrontal cortex in retrieval of semantic knowledge: A reevaluation (1704 citations)
  • What is "special" about face perception? (1035 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Her scientific interests lie mostly in Cognitive psychology, Cognition, Developmental psychology, Neuroscience and Perception. The study incorporates disciplines such as Visual agnosia, Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition, Mental image, Visual perception and Semantic memory in addition to Cognitive psychology. Her work carried out in the field of Cognition brings together such families of science as Amphetamine and Clinical psychology.

Her study in the field of Child development also crosses realms of Socioeconomic status. While the research belongs to areas of Perception, Martha J. Farah spends her time largely on the problem of Communication, intersecting her research to questions surrounding Artificial intelligence, Facial recognition system and Face perception. The concepts of her Cognitive neuroscience study are interwoven with issues in Cognitive science and Functional neuroimaging.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Cognitive psychology (47.52%)
  • Cognition (29.75%)
  • Developmental psychology (19.83%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Developmental psychology (19.83%)
  • Socioeconomic status (11.16%)
  • Cognition (29.75%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Her primary areas of study are Developmental psychology, Socioeconomic status, Cognition, Neuroscience and Cognitive psychology. Her studies deal with areas such as Meta-analysis, Working memory and Cognitive neuroscience as well as Developmental psychology. She is studying Prefrontal cortex, which is a component of Cognition.

Her Neuroscience study combines topics in areas such as Neurolaw, Historical Article, Relevance and Transhumanism. Martha J. Farah combines subjects such as Severe brain damage, Consciousness, Neuroimaging and Perception with her study of Cognitive psychology. Her Perception research incorporates elements of Visual neglect, Recognition memory, Stimulus and Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition.

Between 2012 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Socioeconomic status and executive function: developmental trajectories and mediation. (258 citations)
  • The Neuroscience of Socioeconomic Status: Correlates, Causes, and Consequences (176 citations)
  • Progress and challenges in probing the human brain (151 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Law

Her primary areas of investigation include Developmental psychology, Cognition, Socioeconomic status, Working memory and Cognitive science. Her work focuses on many connections between Developmental psychology and other disciplines, such as Meta-analysis, that overlap with her field of interest in Demography, Methylphenidate and Stimulant. Cognition is a subfield of Neuroscience that she investigates.

Her work is dedicated to discovering how Working memory, Amphetamine are connected with Raven's Progressive Matrices, Moderation, Young adult and Perception and other disciplines. In her study, Cognitive psychology is strongly linked to Healthy individuals, which falls under the umbrella field of Transcranial direct-current stimulation. Her study on Set is often connected to Societal impact of nanotechnology as part of broader study in Cognitive psychology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Parts and wholes in face recognition

James W. Tanaka;Martha J. Farah.
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (1993)

2720 Citations

Role of left inferior prefrontal cortex in retrieval of semantic knowledge: A reevaluation

Sharon L. Thompson-Schill;Mark D’Esposito;Geoffrey K. Aguirre;Martha J. Farah.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1997)

2218 Citations

Visual Agnosia

Martha J. Farah.
(1990)

1957 Citations

What is "special" about face perception?

Martha J. Farah;Kevin D. Wilson;Maxwell Drain;James N. Tanaka.
Psychological Review (1998)

1547 Citations

Socioeconomic status and the developing brain

Daniel A. Hackman;Martha J. Farah.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2009)

1532 Citations

Socioeconomic status and the brain: mechanistic insights from human and animal research

Daniel A. Hackman;Martha J. Farah;Michael J. Meaney;Michael J. Meaney.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2010)

1305 Citations

Neurocognitive Correlates of Socioeconomic Status in Kindergarten Children.

Kimberly G. Noble;Kimberly G. Noble;M. Frank Norman;Martha J. Farah.
Developmental Science (2005)

1172 Citations

A computational model of semantic memory impairment: modality specificity and emergent category specificity.

Martha J. Farah;James L. McClelland.
Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (1991)

1129 Citations

Towards responsible use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by the healthy

Henry Greely;Barbara Sahakian;John Harris;Ronald C. Kessler.
Nature (2008)

1075 Citations

Socioeconomic Gradients Predict Individual Differences in Neurocognitive Abilities.

Kimberly G. Noble;Kimberly G. Noble;Bruce D. McCandliss;Martha J. Farah.
Developmental Science (2007)

1051 Citations

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