D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 66 Citations 22,466 182 World Ranking 1587 National Ranking 971

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2008 - Troland Research Awards, United States National Academy of Sciences For seminal experiments on the role of visual expertise in the recognition of complex objects including faces and for exploration of brain areas activated by this recognition.

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognition
  • Perception

Her main research concerns Cognitive psychology, Perception, Communication, Face perception and Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition. Her Cognitive psychology research includes elements of Face, Face, Fusiform gyrus and Fusiform face area. Her Perception research incorporates elements of Facial recognition system, Cognitive science, Neuropsychology and Information processing.

Her study in Communication is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Object, Artificial intelligence, Form perception, Scalp and Neuroscience. Her Face perception study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Context, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Task and Asperger syndrome. The Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition study combines topics in areas such as Short-term memory and Brain activity and meditation.

Her most cited work include:

  • Expertise for cars and birds recruits brain areas involved in face recognition (1110 citations)
  • Activation of the middle fusiform 'face area' increases with expertise in recognizing novel objects. (1015 citations)
  • Abnormal ventral temporal cortical activity during face discrimination among individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome. (836 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Isabel Gauthier mainly focuses on Cognitive psychology, Perception, Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition, Artificial intelligence and Communication. She has researched Cognitive psychology in several fields, including Social psychology, Face perception, Task, Cognition and Visual perception. Face perception is closely attributed to Face in her research.

She focuses mostly in the field of Perception, narrowing it down to topics relating to Categorization and, in certain cases, Concept learning. The various areas that she examines in her Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition study include Facial recognition system, Form perception, Mental rotation and Contrast. Her Communication research integrates issues from Stimulus and Object.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Cognitive psychology (54.44%)
  • Perception (38.22%)
  • Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition (25.48%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition (25.48%)
  • Cognitive psychology (54.44%)
  • Artificial intelligence (21.62%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Her primary areas of investigation include Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition, Cognitive psychology, Artificial intelligence, Facial recognition system and Perception. Her research investigates the link between Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition and topics such as Speech recognition that cross with problems in Bayesian statistics and Face identity. Her Cognitive psychology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Selective attention, Object, Face and Association.

Her biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Social psychology, Task and Visual learning. Her work focuses on many connections between Facial recognition system and other disciplines, such as Thick cortex, that overlap with her field of interest in Anatomy. Her Perception research includes themes of Cognitive science and Medical imaging.

Between 2016 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • General object recognition is specific: Evidence from novel and familiar objects. (36 citations)
  • The Role of Experience in the Face-Selective Response in Right FFA. (16 citations)
  • Limited evidence of individual differences in holistic processing in different versions of the part-whole paradigm (11 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition, Cognitive psychology, Face, Facial recognition system and Variance. The study incorporates disciplines such as Dissociation, Speech recognition, Selective attention and Face perception in addition to Cognitive neuroscience of visual object recognition. In most of her Cognitive psychology studies, her work intersects topics such as Association.

Her Face research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Memory test, Machine learning and Task. Her Facial recognition system research includes themes of Developmental psychology and Social psychology. The various areas that Isabel Gauthier examines in her Artificial intelligence study include Relevance, Experimental psychology and Perception.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Expertise for cars and birds recruits brain areas involved in face recognition

Isabel Gauthier;Pawel Skudlarski;John C. Gore;Adam W. Anderson.
Nature Neuroscience (2000)

1696 Citations

Activation of the middle fusiform 'face area' increases with expertise in recognizing novel objects.

Isabel Gauthier;Michael J. Tarr;Adam W. Anderson;Pawel Skudlarski.
Nature Neuroscience (1999)

1512 Citations

Abnormal ventral temporal cortical activity during face discrimination among individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome.

Robert T. Schultz;Isabel Gauthier;Ami Klin;Robert K. Fulbright.
Archives of General Psychiatry (2000)

1237 Citations

Becoming a “Greeble” Expert: Exploring Mechanisms for Face Recognition

Isabel Gauthier;Michael J. Tarr.
Vision Research (1997)

1154 Citations

The N170 occipito-temporal component is delayed and enhanced to inverted faces but not to inverted objects: an electrophysiological account of face-specific processes in the human brain

Bruno Rossion;Isabel Gauthier;Michael J Tarr;P Despland.
Neuroreport (2000)

975 Citations

The Fusiform Face Area is Part of a Network that Processes Faces at the Individual Level

Isabel Gauthier;Michael J. Tarr;Jill Moylan;Pawel Skudlarski.
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2000)

916 Citations

FFA: a flexible fusiform area for subordinate-level visual processing automatized by expertise

Michael J. Tarr;Isabel Gauthier.
Nature Neuroscience (2000)

784 Citations

Social interest and the development of cortical face specialization: what autism teaches us about face processing.

David J. Grelotti;Isabel Gauthier;Robert T. Schultz.
Developmental Psychobiology (2002)

538 Citations

Training ‘greeble’ experts: a framework for studying expert object recognition processes

Isabel Gauthier;Pepper Williams;Michael J. Tarr;James Tanaka.
Vision Research (1998)

505 Citations

Unraveling mechanisms for expert object recognition: bridging brain activity and behavior.

Isabel Gauthier;Michael J. Tarr.
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance (2002)

498 Citations

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