H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Plant Science and Agronomy H-index 55 Citations 11,470 91 World Ranking 444 National Ranking 55

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Botany
  • Ecosystem

Brendan Choat spends much of his time researching Xylem, Botany, Hydraulic conductivity, Ecology and Water transport. His Xylem research incorporates themes from Porosity and Woody plant. As a part of the same scientific family, Brendan Choat mostly works in the field of Botany, focusing on Biophysics and, on occasion, Vitis vinifera and Hardwood.

His Hydraulic conductivity research focuses on Transpiration and how it connects with Composite material. He brings together Water transport and Agronomy to produce work in his papers. The various areas that Brendan Choat examines in his Climate change study include Biodiversity and Biome.

His most cited work include:

  • Global convergence in the vulnerability of forests to drought (1256 citations)
  • Structure and function of bordered pits: new discoveries and impacts on whole-plant hydraulic function (366 citations)
  • Triggers of tree mortality under drought (316 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary scientific interests are in Xylem, Botany, Hydraulic conductivity, Water transport and Ecology. His research integrates issues of Soil science, Woody plant and Transpiration in his study of Xylem. His Transpiration research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Canopy and Stomatal conductance.

His work on Tracheid, Evergreen, Vitis vinifera and Rainforest as part of general Botany research is often related to X-ray microtomography, thus linking different fields of science. Brendan Choat works mostly in the field of Hydraulic conductivity, limiting it down to topics relating to Intraspecific competition and, in certain cases, Interspecific competition, as a part of the same area of interest. His work is dedicated to discovering how Biome, Arid are connected with Adaptation and other disciplines.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Xylem (60.80%)
  • Botany (48.80%)
  • Hydraulic conductivity (24.80%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Xylem (60.80%)
  • Agronomy (17.60%)
  • Drought tolerance (8.80%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Xylem, Agronomy, Drought tolerance, Ecology and Tree species are his primary areas of study. He is investigating Horticulture and Botany as part of his examination of Xylem. His work carried out in the field of Horticulture brings together such families of science as Irrigation and Transpiration.

The concepts of his Botany study are interwoven with issues in Global biodiversity and Acacia aneura. His Agronomy research incorporates elements of Eucalyptus and Ecosystem respiration. Brendan Choat interconnects Hydraulic conductivity, Water use, Intraspecific competition and Hakea leucoptera in the investigation of issues within Drought tolerance.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • TRY plant trait database : Enhanced coverage and open access (179 citations)
  • Hanging by a thread? Forests and drought (61 citations)
  • Drought response strategies and hydraulic traits contribute to mechanistic understanding of plant dry-down to hydraulic failure. (26 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Botany
  • Ecosystem

His scientific interests lie mostly in Agronomy, Drought tolerance, Eucalyptus, Tree species and Climate change. His Biomass study, which is part of a larger body of work in Agronomy, is frequently linked to Critical level and Principal mechanism, bridging the gap between disciplines. His Eucalyptus study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Desiccation, Woody plant, Xylem and Resistance.

Xylem is closely attributed to Drought stress in his work. His Tree species study which covers Nutrient that intersects with Water stress and Biodiversity. His study looks at the relationship between Climate change and topics such as Eddy covariance, which overlap with Vegetation.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Global convergence in the vulnerability of forests to drought

Brendan Choat;Steven Jansen;Tim J. Brodribb;Hervé Cochard;Hervé Cochard.
Nature (2012)

1483 Citations

Structure and function of bordered pits: new discoveries and impacts on whole-plant hydraulic function

Brendan Choat;Alexander R. Cobb;Steven Jansen.
New Phytologist (2008)

508 Citations

Meta-analysis reveals that hydraulic traits explain cross-species patterns of drought-induced tree mortality across the globe

William R. L. Anderegg;Tamir Klein;Megan Bartlett;Lawren Sack.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

400 Citations

Triggers of tree mortality under drought

Brendan Choat;Timothy J Brodribb;Craig R Brodersen;Remko A Duursma.
Nature (2018)

390 Citations

Testing hypotheses that link wood anatomy to cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in the genus Acer

Frederic Lens;Frederic Lens;John S. Sperry;Mairgareth A. Christman;Brendan Choat.
New Phytologist (2011)

367 Citations

The Dynamics of Embolism Repair in Xylem: In Vivo Visualizations Using High-Resolution Computed Tomography

Craig R. Brodersen;Andrew J. McElrone;Brendan Choat;Mark A. Matthews.
Plant Physiology (2010)

351 Citations

Methods for measuring plant vulnerability to cavitation: a critical review

Hervé Cochard;Eric Badel;Stéphane Herbette;Sylvain Delzon.
Journal of Experimental Botany (2013)

297 Citations

Morphological variation of intervessel pit membranes and implications to xylem function in angiosperms

Steven Jansen;Brendan Choat;Annelies Pletsers.
American Journal of Botany (2009)

294 Citations

Weak tradeoff between xylem safety and xylem-specific hydraulic efficiency across the world's woody plant species

Sean M. Gleason;Sean M. Gleason;Mark Westoby;Steven Jansen;Brendan Choat.
New Phytologist (2016)

293 Citations

Pit membrane porosity and water stress-induced cavitation in four co-existing dry rainforest tree species.

Brendan Choat;Marilyn Ball;Jon G Luly;Joseph A M Holtum.
Plant Physiology (2003)

257 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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