H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 52 Citations 13,164 112 World Ranking 3104 National Ranking 1790

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Social psychology
  • Law
  • Social science

Aaron C. Kay focuses on Social psychology, System justification, Status quo, Politics and Control. His study in Social psychology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Developmental psychology, Social cognition and Belief in God. His System justification research incorporates themes from Perception, Prejudice, Legitimacy, Sociocultural evolution and Stereotype.

In his research, Honesty, Lexical decision task, Happiness and Ambivalent sexism is intimately related to Social perception, which falls under the overarching field of Stereotype. His Status quo research focuses on Derogation and how it relates to Affirmative action. His Politics research includes elements of Terror management theory and Psychoanalysis.

His most cited work include:

  • Complementary justice: effects of "poor but happy" and "poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive. (582 citations)
  • Exposure to benevolent sexism and complementary gender stereotypes: consequences for specific and diffuse forms of system justification. (558 citations)
  • God and the government: Testing a compensatory control mechanism for the support of external systems. (430 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Social psychology, System justification, Perception, Ideology and Status quo. His study looks at the intersection of Social psychology and topics like Social perception with Interpersonal relationship. His study looks at the relationship between System justification and topics such as Social change, which overlap with Resistance.

In Perception, Aaron C. Kay works on issues like Priming, which are connected to Construal level theory. His studies deal with areas such as Phenomenon and Meritocracy as well as Ideology. His work carried out in the field of Status quo brings together such families of science as Ambivalent sexism and Derogation.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Social psychology (73.49%)
  • System justification (27.11%)
  • Perception (15.66%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Social psychology (73.49%)
  • Compensatory control (7.83%)
  • Ideology (14.46%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Social psychology, Compensatory control, Ideology, Perception and Attribution. The concepts of his Social psychology study are interwoven with issues in System justification, Empowerment and Morality. His study in System justification is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Biology and political orientation, Deception, Status quo and Appeal.

His Ideology study combines topics in areas such as Phenomenon, Meritocracy and Scientific skepticism, Skepticism. His Perception study incorporates themes from Cognitive psychology, Goal pursuit and Affect. His Attribution study deals with Passion intersecting with Moderated mediation, Just-world hypothesis, Job satisfaction, Economic Justice and Job description.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • System justification: Experimental evidence, its contextual nature, and implications for social change. (21 citations)
  • Guns as a source of order and chaos: compensatory control and the psychological (dis)utility of guns for liberals and conservatives (17 citations)
  • Lean in messages increase attributions of women's responsibility for gender inequality. (15 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Social psychology
  • Law
  • Social science

Aaron C. Kay mainly focuses on Social psychology, Compensatory control, Perception, Attribution and Ideology. Social psychology connects with themes related to System justification in his study. His Compensatory control research incorporates elements of Perceived control, Order, Political economy and Realm.

His research in Perception intersects with topics in Dehumanization and Morality. His Attribution study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Moderated mediation, Social equality, Empowerment and Appeal. Aaron C. Kay interconnects Passion, Just-world hypothesis, Job satisfaction, Economic Justice and Job description in the investigation of issues within Ideology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Complementary justice: effects of "poor but happy" and "poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive.

Aaron C. Kay;John T. Jost.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2003)

1111 Citations

Exposure to benevolent sexism and complementary gender stereotypes: consequences for specific and diffuse forms of system justification.

John T. Jost;Aaron C. Kay.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2005)

1103 Citations

God and the government: Testing a compensatory control mechanism for the support of external systems.

Aaron C. Kay;Danielle Gaucher;Jamie L. Napier;Mitchell J. Callan.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2008)

833 Citations

Material priming: The influence of mundane physical objects on situational construal and competitive behavioral choice ☆

Aaron C. Kay;S.Christian Wheeler;John A. Bargh;Lee Ross.
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (2004)

570 Citations

Compensatory Control Achieving Order Through the Mind, Our Institutions, and the Heavens

Aaron C. Kay;Jennifer A. Whitson;Danielle Gaucher;Adam D. Galinsky.
Current Directions in Psychological Science (2009)

500 Citations

Inequality, discrimination, and the power of the status quo: Direct evidence for a motivation to see the way things are as the way they should be.

Aaron C. Kay;Danielle Gaucher;Jennifer M. Peach;Kristin Laurin.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2009)

470 Citations

Evidence That Gendered Wording in Job Advertisements Exists and Sustains Gender Inequality

Danielle Gaucher;Justin Friesen;Aaron C. Kay.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2011)

437 Citations

Solution aversion: On the relation between ideology and motivated disbelief.

Troy H. Campbell;Aaron C. Kay.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2014)

390 Citations

Victim Derogation and Victim Enhancement as Alternate Routes to System Justification

Aaron C. Kay;John T. Jost;Sean Young.
Psychological Science (2005)

372 Citations

Social Justice: History, Theory, and Research

John T. Jost;Aaron C. Kay.
Handbook of Social Psychology (2010)

347 Citations

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