D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 85 Citations 66,109 178 World Ranking 644 National Ranking 411

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2018 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Social psychology
  • Statistics
  • Cognition

Brian A. Nosek focuses on Social psychology, Implicit attitude, Implicit-association test, Replication crisis and Social psychology. His Social psychology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Self report and Social cognition. His Implicit attitude study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Association, Age differences and Anti-fat bias.

The concepts of his Implicit-association test study are interwoven with issues in Test validity and Implicit cognition. His Replication crisis study incorporates themes from p-value and Replication. The concepts of his Social psychology study are interwoven with issues in Data collection, Applied psychology, Open science, Open data and Transparency.

His most cited work include:

  • Understanding and using the implicit association test: I. An improved scoring algorithm. (3941 citations)
  • Power failure: why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience (3795 citations)
  • Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science (3492 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Social psychology, Implicit-association test, Implicit attitude, Replication and Cognitive psychology. Brian A. Nosek focuses mostly in the field of Social psychology, narrowing it down to topics relating to Social cognition and, in certain cases, Social perception. In his study, Predictive validity is strongly linked to Psychometrics, which falls under the umbrella field of Implicit-association test.

Brian A. Nosek performs integrative Replication and Reproducibility Project research in his work. Brian A. Nosek integrates many fields, such as Reproducibility Project and Statistics, in his works. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Social science, True positive rate, Bayesian probability and False positive paradox.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Social psychology (54.96%)
  • Implicit-association test (26.45%)
  • Implicit attitude (20.25%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Social psychology (54.96%)
  • Replication (19.42%)
  • Open science (13.64%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Brian A. Nosek mostly deals with Social psychology, Replication, Open science, Data science and Cognitive psychology. His Social psychology study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Psychological intervention and Social cognition. His study in Replication is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Psychological science, Sample size determination, Meta-analysis and Scientific progress.

He has included themes like Management science, Public relations and Reputation in his Open science study. His Cognitive psychology study combines topics in areas such as Co-occurrence, Relevance measure and Priming. His studies in Implicit-association test integrate themes in fields like Construct validity and Statistical power.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • A manifesto for reproducible science (1111 citations)
  • A manifesto for reproducible science (1111 citations)
  • Redefine statistical significance (993 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Social psychology
  • Statistics
  • Cognition

Replication, Open science, Credibility, Data science and Reproducibility Project are his primary areas of study. His study on Replication is covered under Statistics. His Open science research incorporates elements of Popularity and Open research.

His Credibility research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Technical report, Risk analysis and Reliability. Brian A. Nosek combines subjects such as Variety, Bioinformatics and Scope with his study of Data science. His studies examine the connections between Pessimism and genetics, as well as such issues in Cognitive psychology, with regards to Generalizability theory, Value and Generative grammar.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Understanding and using the implicit association test: I. An improved scoring algorithm.

Anthony G. Greenwald;Brian A. Nosek;Mahzarin R. Banaji.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2003)

5900 Citations

Power failure: why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience

Katherine S. Button;John P. A. Ioannidis;Claire Mokrysz;Brian A. Nosek.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2013)

5566 Citations

A unified theory of implicit attitudes, stereotypes, self-esteem, and self-concept.

Anthony G. Greenwald;Mahzarin R. Banaji;Laurie A. Rudman;Shelly D. Farnham.
Psychological Review (2002)

4737 Citations

Liberals and Conservatives Rely on Different Sets of Moral Foundations

Jesse Graham;Jonathan Haidt;Brian A. Nosek.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2009)

3656 Citations

A Decade of System Justification Theory: Accumulated Evidence of Conscious and Unconscious Bolstering of the Status Quo

John T. Jost;Mahzarin R. Banaji;Brian A. Nosek.
Political Psychology (2004)

3115 Citations

Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

Alexander A. Aarts;Joanna E. Anderson;Christopher J. Anderson;Peter R. Attridge;Peter R. Attridge.
Science (2015)

2871 Citations

Mapping the Moral Domain

Jesse Graham;Brian A. Nosek;Jonathan Haidt;Ravi Iyer.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2011)

2156 Citations

Harvesting implicit group attitudes and beliefs from a demonstration web site

Brian A. Nosek;Mahzarin R. Banaji;Anthony G. Greenwald.
Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice (2002)

1702 Citations

The Implicit Association Test at Age 7: A Methodological and Conceptual Review

Brian A. Nosek;Anthony G. Greenwald;Mahzarin R. Banaji.
(2007)

1554 Citations

THE GO/NO-GO ASSOCIATION TASK

Brian A. Nosek;Mahzarin R. Banaji.
Social Cognition (2001)

1510 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Brian A. Nosek

Jan De Houwer

Jan De Houwer

Ghent University

Publications: 115

John T. Jost

John T. Jost

New York University

Publications: 106

Bertram Gawronski

Bertram Gawronski

The University of Texas at Austin

Publications: 98

John F. Dovidio

John F. Dovidio

Yale University

Publications: 95

Reinout W. Wiers

Reinout W. Wiers

University of Amsterdam

Publications: 92

John P. A. Ioannidis

John P. A. Ioannidis

Stanford University

Publications: 83

Mahzarin R. Banaji

Mahzarin R. Banaji

Harvard University

Publications: 74

Marcus R. Munafò

Marcus R. Munafò

University of Bristol

Publications: 67

Anthony G. Greenwald

Anthony G. Greenwald

University of Washington

Publications: 57

Bethany A. Teachman

Bethany A. Teachman

University of Virginia

Publications: 55

Dermot Barnes-Holmes

Dermot Barnes-Holmes

University of Ulster

Publications: 55

Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

University of Amsterdam

Publications: 55

Liane Young

Liane Young

Boston College

Publications: 51

Chris G. Sibley

Chris G. Sibley

University of Auckland

Publications: 51

Jesse Graham

Jesse Graham

University of Utah

Publications: 50

Boris Egloff

Boris Egloff

Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz

Publications: 45

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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