H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 70 Citations 21,661 144 World Ranking 1286 National Ranking 148

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

1996 - Member of Academia Europaea

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Linguistics
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognition

William D. Marslen-Wilson spends much of his time researching Linguistics, Artificial intelligence, Lexical decision task, Natural language processing and Word recognition. His Linguistics research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Parsing and Priming. In the subject of general Artificial intelligence, his work in Representation and Inference is often linked to Statistical inference, Toolbox and Set, thereby combining diverse domains of study.

William D. Marslen-Wilson interconnects Mental lexicon, Word lists by frequency, Phonetics, Lexical item and Psycholinguistics in the investigation of issues within Lexical decision task. William D. Marslen-Wilson combines subjects such as Semantics and Perception with his study of Natural language processing. His studies in Word recognition integrate themes in fields like Speech recognition, Levels-of-processing effect and Speech perception.

His most cited work include:

  • Functional parallelism in spoken word-recognition. (1319 citations)
  • Processing interactions and lexical access during word recognition in continuous speech (1086 citations)
  • The temporal structure of spoken language understanding (1060 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Linguistics, Artificial intelligence, Natural language processing, Cognition and Lexical decision task. His Linguistics study often links to related topics such as Priming. His work deals with themes such as Word lists by frequency and Psycholinguistics, which intersect with Natural language processing.

His study looks at the intersection of Cognition and topics like Cognitive science with Perception. His study in Lexical decision task is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Compound, Cognitive psychology, Phonetics, Lexical item and Semantic property. His Word recognition research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Speech recognition, Ambiguity and Spoken language.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Linguistics (49.76%)
  • Artificial intelligence (27.80%)
  • Natural language processing (23.90%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2010-2021)?

  • Linguistics (49.76%)
  • Artificial intelligence (27.80%)
  • Speech recognition (20.49%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Linguistics, Artificial intelligence, Speech recognition, Cognitive psychology and Neuroscience. His Linguistics study combines topics in areas such as Cognition and Priming. The Artificial intelligence study combines topics in areas such as Pattern recognition, Information flow and Natural language processing.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Sensory system and Magnetoencephalography. His research on Cognitive psychology also deals with topics like

  • Middle temporal gyrus which intersects with area such as Word recognition,
  • Brain mapping, which have a strong connection to Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Lateralization of brain function and Comprehension,
  • Lexical decision task which intersects with area such as Angular gyrus, Phonetics, Lexical semantics, Semantic property and Left inferior frontal gyrus. His work deals with themes such as Context and Spoken language, which intersect with Word recognition.

Between 2010 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • A toolbox for representational similarity analysis. (493 citations)
  • The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) study protocol: a cross-sectional, lifespan, multidisciplinary examination of healthy cognitive ageing (244 citations)
  • The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) study protocol: a cross-sectional, lifespan, multidisciplinary examination of healthy cognitive ageing (244 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Linguistics
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Cognition

William D. Marslen-Wilson focuses on Neuroscience, Cognitive psychology, Brain mapping, Functional magnetic resonance imaging and Middle temporal gyrus. In general Neuroscience study, his work on Neurocognitive, Functional neuroimaging, Cognition and Psycholinguistics often relates to the realm of Artificial grammar learning, thereby connecting several areas of interest. The study incorporates disciplines such as Task analysis, Perception, Vocabulary and Lexical decision task in addition to Cognitive psychology.

As a part of the same scientific study, he usually deals with the Brain mapping, concentrating on Lateralization of brain function and frequently concerns with Syntax, Comprehension and Cognitive science. As part of one scientific family, William D. Marslen-Wilson deals mainly with the area of Middle temporal gyrus, narrowing it down to issues related to the Word recognition, and often Context, Spoken language, Brodmann area, Inferior frontal gyrus and Superior temporal gyrus. His Context research is under the purview of Linguistics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Functional parallelism in spoken word-recognition.

William D. Marslen-Wilson.
Cognition (1987)

2205 Citations

Processing interactions and lexical access during word recognition in continuous speech

William D Marslen-Wilson;Alan Welsh.
Cognitive Psychology (1978)

1861 Citations

The temporal structure of spoken language understanding

William Marslen-Wilson;Lorraine Komisarjevsky Tyler.
Cognition (1980)

1819 Citations

Morphology and meaning in the English mental lexicon.

William Marslen-Wilson;Lorraine K. Tyler;Rachelle Waksler;Lianne Older.
Psychological Review (1994)

1164 Citations

Lexical representation and process

William Marslen-Wilson.
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (1989)

747 Citations

Sentence perception as an interactive parallel process.

William D. Marslen-Wilson.
Science (1975)

743 Citations

Linguistic Structure and Speech Shadowing at Very Short Latencies

William Marslen-Wilson.
Nature (1973)

669 Citations

Integrating Form and Meaning: A Distributed Model of Speech Perception.

M. Gareth Gaskell;William D. Marslen-Wilson.
Language and Cognitive Processes (1997)

662 Citations

Morphological and semantic effects in visual word recognition: A time-course study

Kathleen Rastle;Matt H. Davis;William D. Marslen-Wilson;Lorraine K. Tyler.
Language and Cognitive Processes (2000)

603 Citations

The time course of visual word recognition as revealed by linear regression analysis of ERP data.

Olaf Hauk;Matthew H. Davis;M. Ford;Friedemann Pulvermüller.
NeuroImage (2006)

580 Citations

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