D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 74 Citations 16,074 241 World Ranking 392 National Ranking 56

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2006 - Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Ecosystem

Sarah Wanless focuses on Ecology, Foraging, Seabird, Predation and Uria aalge. Her work in Ecology is not limited to one particular discipline; it also encompasses Zoology. The study incorporates disciplines such as Range, Home range, Sex specific, Northern gannet and Sulidae in addition to Foraging.

The Seabird study combines topics in areas such as Population density, Sexual dimorphism, Fishing and Animal ecology. Her Predation research incorporates themes from Fishery and North sea. Her Uria aalge research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Cerorhinca monocerata, Energy expenditure and Puffin.

Her most cited work include:

  • Trophic level asynchrony in rates of phenological change for marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments (576 citations)
  • Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels (402 citations)
  • From plankton to top predators: bottom-up control of a marine food web across four trophic levels. (350 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Sarah Wanless mainly focuses on Ecology, Seabird, Foraging, Uria aalge and Zoology. Much of her study explores Ecology relationship to Fishery. Her studies in Fishery integrate themes in fields like Sprat and Apex predator.

Her Seabird study incorporates themes from Seasonal breeder, Pelagic zone, Nest and Puffin. She interconnects Herring, Fratercula arctica and North sea in the investigation of issues within Zoology. Her work in Predation covers topics such as Trophic level which are related to areas like Oceanography.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (66.56%)
  • Seabird (31.56%)
  • Foraging (24.06%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Ecology (66.56%)
  • Seabird (31.56%)
  • Uria aalge (22.19%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Sarah Wanless mostly deals with Ecology, Seabird, Uria aalge, Range and Predation. Her Ecology study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Selection and Reproductive success. Her Seabird research incorporates elements of Zoology, Seasonal breeder, Fishery, Foraging and Competition.

The concepts of her Uria aalge study are interwoven with issues in Statistics, Uria lomvia and Habitat. Her Range study also includes fields such as

  • Life history theory together with Missing data, Econometrics, Kittiwake, Bayesian probability and Rissa tridactyla,
  • Threatened species which is related to area like Intraspecific competition and Global biodiversity. Her studies deal with areas such as Fisheries law, Ecosystem approach and Environmental planning as well as Predation.

Between 2015 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels (402 citations)
  • Do early warning indicators consistently predict nonlinear change in long‐term ecological data? (62 citations)
  • Global phenological insensitivity to shifting ocean temperatures among seabirds (36 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Ecosystem

Her primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Seabird, Trophic level, Competition and Demography. Her Ecology research includes themes of Evolutionary dynamics and Empirical research. She has included themes like Fishery, Foraging and Population dynamics of fisheries in her Seabird study.

Her Fishery research includes elements of Taxonomic rank and Seasonal breeder. Her Trophic level research integrates issues from Climate change and Predation. Her work investigates the relationship between Competition and topics such as Range that intersect with problems in Habitat, Intraspecific competition, Global biodiversity, Threatened species and Uria aalge.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Trophic level asynchrony in rates of phenological change for marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments

Stephen J. Thackeray;Timothy H. Sparks;Morten Frederiksen;Sarah Burthe.
Global Change Biology (2010)

718 Citations

From plankton to top predators: bottom-up control of a marine food web across four trophic levels.

Morten Frederiksen;Martin Edwards;Anthony J. Richardson;Anthony J. Richardson;Nicholas C. Halliday.
Journal of Animal Ecology (2006)

465 Citations

Evidence of intra-specific competition for food in a pelagic seabird

Sue Lewis;T. N. Sherratt;K. C. Hamer;S. Wanless.
Nature (2001)

424 Citations

Low energy values of fish as a probable cause of a major seabird breeding failure in the North Sea

S. Wanless;M. P. Harris;P. Redman;J. R. Speakman.
Marine Ecology Progress Series (2005)

413 Citations

The role of industrial fisheries and oceanographic change in the decline of North Sea black‐legged kittiwakes

Morten Frederiksen;Sarah Wanless;Michael P. Harris;Peter Rothery.
Journal of Applied Ecology (2004)

405 Citations

Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels

Stephen J. Thackeray;Peter A. Henrys;Deborah Hemming;James R. Bell.
Nature (2016)

357 Citations

Can Ethograms Be Automatically Generated Using Body Acceleration Data from Free-Ranging Birds?

Kentaro Q. Sakamoto;Katsufumi Sato;Mayumi Ishizuka;Yutaka Watanuki.
PLOS ONE (2009)

289 Citations

Sex-specific foraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird

Sue Lewis;S. Benvenuti;L. Dall'Antonia;R. Griffiths.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2002)

288 Citations

Scale‐dependent climate signals drive breeding phenology of three seabird species

Morten Frederiksen;Michael P. Harris;Francis Daunt;Peter Rothery.
Global Change Biology (2004)

234 Citations

Effects of prey abundance on the foraging behaviour, diving efficiency and time allocation of breeding guillemots Uria aalge

P. Monaghan;P. Walton;S. Wanless;J.D. Uttley.
Ibis (2008)

231 Citations

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