D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 58 Citations 21,873 144 World Ranking 1121 National Ranking 145

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystem

Robert M. Ewers focuses on Ecology, Habitat, Habitat fragmentation, Biodiversity and Fragmentation. His study connects Extinction and Ecology. His Habitat research incorporates themes from Dominance and Invasive species.

His research in Habitat fragmentation intersects with topics in Habitat destruction and Forest dynamics. His Biodiversity study combines topics in areas such as Intact forest landscape, Environmental change, Ecology and Introduced species. His Species richness research includes elements of Species distribution and Biological dispersal, Metapopulation.

His most cited work include:

  • Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation (1480 citations)
  • Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation (1480 citations)
  • Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity (1401 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Robert M. Ewers mainly focuses on Ecology, Biodiversity, Habitat, Habitat fragmentation and Ecosystem. Robert M. Ewers frequently studies issues relating to Extinction and Ecology. The concepts of his Biodiversity study are interwoven with issues in Agroforestry, Ecology, Environmental resource management, Logging and Threatened species.

His research integrates issues of Abundance, Restoration ecology, Environmental change, Introduced species and Biological dispersal in his study of Habitat. Robert M. Ewers has researched Habitat fragmentation in several fields, including Ordination, Species distribution, Community composition, Spatial ecology and Landscape ecology. His research in Ecosystem focuses on subjects like Environmental protection, which are connected to Buffer zone, Nature reserve and Protected area.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (71.67%)
  • Biodiversity (36.67%)
  • Habitat (41.11%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Ecology (71.67%)
  • Habitat (41.11%)
  • Biodiversity (36.67%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Habitat, Biodiversity, Rainforest and Ecosystem. In general Ecology study, his work on Threatened species, Species richness, Fragmentation and Land use often relates to the realm of Palm oil, thereby connecting several areas of interest. His Species richness research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Agriculture and Ecosystem services.

His work in Habitat addresses issues such as Extinction, which are connected to fields such as Habitat destruction and Habitat fragmentation. His Biodiversity research incorporates elements of Food web, Deforestation, Freshwater ecosystem and Apex predator. The Ecosystem study which covers Abundance that intersects with Subtropics and Diameter at breast height.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals. (40 citations)
  • The conservation value of human-modified landscapes for the world’s primates (35 citations)
  • Termite environmental tolerances are more linked to desiccation than temperature in modified tropical forests (18 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Biodiversity

Robert M. Ewers mainly investigates Ecology, Biodiversity, Rainforest, Ecosystem and Habitat. In most of his Ecology studies, his work intersects topics such as Mark and recapture. His Rainforest study incorporates themes from Humus, Desiccation, Desiccation tolerance, Ecological succession and Climate change.

Robert M. Ewers interconnects Biomass, Tropics, Pioneer species, Logging and Tropical rainforest in the investigation of issues within Ecosystem. Threatened species and Habitat fragmentation are the subjects of his Habitat studies. The Extinction study combines topics in areas such as Habitat destruction, Deforestation, Disturbance, Arboreal locomotion and Fragmentation.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation

Robert M. Ewers;Robert M. Ewers;Raphael K. Didham.
Biological Reviews (2005)

2080 Citations

Habitat fragmentation and its lasting impact on Earth’s ecosystems

Nick M. Haddad;Lars A. Brudvig;Jean Clobert;Kendi F. Davies.
Science Advances (2015)

1606 Citations

Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity

Tim Newbold;Lawrence N Hudson;Samantha L L Hill;Sara Contu.
Nature (2015)

1566 Citations

Landscape moderation of biodiversity patterns and processes - eight hypotheses

Teja Tscharntke;Jason M. Tylianakis;Tatyana A. Rand;Raphael K. Didham;Raphael K. Didham;Raphael K. Didham.
Biological Reviews (2012)

1310 Citations

Are invasive species the drivers of ecological change

Raphael K. Didham;Jason M. Tylianakis;Melissa A. Hutchison;Robert M. Ewers.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2005)

911 Citations

Prospects for tropical forest biodiversity in a human-modified world.

Toby A. Gardner;Toby A. Gardner;Jos Barlow;Robin Chazdon;Robert M. Ewers.
Ecology Letters (2009)

902 Citations

Interactive effects of habitat modification and species invasion on native species decline.

Raphael K. Didham;Jason M. Tylianakis;Neil J. Gemmell;Tatyana A. Rand.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2007)

895 Citations

Habitat fragmentation, variable edge effects, and the landscape-divergence hypothesis.

William F. Laurance;Henrique E. M. Nascimento;Susan G. Laurance;Ana Andrade.
PLOS ONE (2007)

411 Citations

Functional traits, the phylogeny of function, and ecosystem service vulnerability.

Sandra Díaz;Andy Purvis;Johannes H. C. Cornelissen;Georgina M. Mace;Georgina M. Mace.
Ecology and Evolution (2013)

374 Citations

Do increases in agricultural yield spare land for nature

Robert Mark Ewers;Robert Mark Ewers;Jorn P. W. Scharlemann;Andrew Balmford;Rhys E. Green;Rhys E. Green.
Global Change Biology (2009)

336 Citations

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Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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