D-Index & Metrics Best Publications
Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Environmental Sciences D-index 55 Citations 8,622 143 World Ranking 1525 National Ranking 34

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Archaeology

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo spends much of his time researching Taphonomy, Archaeology, Paleontology, Carnivore and Olduvai Gorge. His research in Taphonomy intersects with topics in Cave, Animal bone, Early Pleistocene, Zooarchaeology and Assemblage. The Archaeology study combines topics in areas such as Ungulate and Fauna.

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo has included themes like Hammerstone, Human evolution, Hominidae and Limb bones in his Paleontology study. His study explores the link between Carnivore and topics such as Evolutionary biology that cross with problems in Deep time and Biomineralization. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Knapping and Alluvial plain.

His most cited work include:

  • A new protocol to differentiate trampling marks from butchery cut marks (306 citations)
  • 2.6-Million-year-old stone tools and associated bones from OGS-6 and OGS-7, Gona, Afar, Ethiopia. (305 citations)
  • The use of tooth pits to identify carnivore taxa in tooth-marked archaeofaunas and their relevance to reconstruct hominid carcass processing behaviours (222 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo mostly deals with Archaeology, Olduvai Gorge, Taphonomy, Paleontology and Assemblage. His study connects Fauna and Archaeology. His Olduvai Gorge study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Phytolith, Early Pleistocene, Acheulean, Human evolution and Paleoecology.

Taphonomy is a subfield of Ecology that Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo studies. His study in Paleontology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Hammerstone and Animal bone. His Assemblage research integrates issues from Faunal assemblage, Lithic technology and Wildebeest.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Archaeology (44.17%)
  • Olduvai Gorge (42.72%)
  • Taphonomy (41.26%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Olduvai Gorge (42.72%)
  • Artificial intelligence (12.62%)
  • Taphonomy (41.26%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Olduvai Gorge, Artificial intelligence, Taphonomy, Bone surface and Assemblage. Archaeology covers Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo research in Olduvai Gorge. His research in the fields of Excavation, Megafauna and Pleistocene overlaps with other disciplines such as Large size.

His work carried out in the field of Taphonomy brings together such families of science as Lithic technology, Morphometrics, Hyaena, Lead and Morphometric analysis. Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo interconnects Paleontology and Morphology in the investigation of issues within Morphometric analysis. His Assemblage research includes themes of Zoology, Carnivore, Context and Wildebeest.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Successful classification of experimental bone surface modifications (BSM) through machine learning algorithms: a solution to the controversial use of BSM in paleoanthropology? (23 citations)
  • Successful classification of experimental bone surface modifications (BSM) through machine learning algorithms: a solution to the controversial use of BSM in paleoanthropology? (23 citations)
  • Automated identification and deep classification of cut marks on bones and its paleoanthropological implications (13 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Archaeology

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo mainly focuses on Bone surface, Machine learning, Artificial intelligence, Algorithm and Multivariate statistics. His Machine learning research focuses on Equifinality and how it connects with Identification, Assemblage, Evolutionary biology, Interspecific competition and Taxon. His Artificial intelligence study frequently intersects with other fields, such as Carnivore.

His Carnivore study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Taphonomy and Morphometric analysis. His Algorithm research incorporates elements of Statistical hypothesis testing, Agency and Fracture. His work deals with themes such as Interpretation and Raw data, which intersect with Multivariate statistics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

2.6-Million-year-old stone tools and associated bones from OGS-6 and OGS-7, Gona, Afar, Ethiopia.

Sileshi Semaw;Michael J Rogers;Jay Quade;Paul R Renne;Paul R Renne.
Journal of Human Evolution (2003)

482 Citations

A new protocol to differentiate trampling marks from butchery cut marks

M. Domínguez-Rodrigo;S. de Juana;A.B. Galán;M. Rodríguez.
Journal of Archaeological Science (2009)

408 Citations

The use of tooth pits to identify carnivore taxa in tooth-marked archaeofaunas and their relevance to reconstruct hominid carcass processing behaviours

Manuel Domı́nguez-Rodrigo;Ana Piqueras.
Journal of Archaeological Science (2003)

323 Citations

Hunting and scavenging by early humans: The state of the debate

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo.
Journal of World Prehistory (2002)

306 Citations

Cutmarked bones from Pliocene archaeological sites at Gona, Afar, Ethiopia: implications for the function of the world's oldest stone tools.

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo;Travis Rayne Pickering;Sileshi Semaw;Michael J. Rogers.
Journal of Human Evolution (2005)

274 Citations

New estimates of tooth mark and percussion mark frequencies at the FLK Zinj site: the carnivore-hominid-carnivore hypothesis falsified

M. Domínguez-Rodrigo;R. Barba.
Journal of Human Evolution (2006)

266 Citations

Flesh availability and bone modifications in carcasses consumed by lions: palaeoecological relevance in hominid foraging patterns

Manuel Domı́nguez-Rodrigo.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (1999)

231 Citations

Deconstructing Olduvai: A Taphonomic Study of the Bed I Sites

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo;Rebeca Barba Egido;Charles P. Egeland.
(2007)

216 Citations

Early hominid hunting and scavenging: A zooarcheological review

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo;Travis Rayne Pickering.
Evolutionary Anthropology (2003)

188 Citations

Configurational approach to identifying the earliest hominin butchers

Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo;Travis Rayne Pickering;Henry T. Bunn.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010)

185 Citations

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Best Scientists Citing Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo

Eudald Carbonell

Eudald Carbonell

Rovira i Virgili University

Publications: 51

Travis Rayne Pickering

Travis Rayne Pickering

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Publications: 47

Ruth Blasco

Ruth Blasco

Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution

Publications: 44

J. Tyler Faith

J. Tyler Faith

University of Utah

Publications: 42

Rosa Huguet

Rosa Huguet

Spanish National Research Council

Publications: 41

Ran Barkai

Ran Barkai

Tel Aviv University

Publications: 35

Alfredo Pérez-González

Alfredo Pérez-González

Complutense University of Madrid

Publications: 30

Juan Luis Arsuaga

Juan Luis Arsuaga

Complutense University of Madrid

Publications: 30

Francesco d'Errico

Francesco d'Errico

University of Bordeaux

Publications: 29

Michael D. Petraglia

Michael D. Petraglia

Max Planck Society

Publications: 29

Marie-Hélène Moncel

Marie-Hélène Moncel

National Museum of Natural History

Publications: 26

Brian G. Richmond

Brian G. Richmond

Aura Health

Publications: 20

Christopher S. Henshilwood

Christopher S. Henshilwood

University of Bergen

Publications: 19

Curtis W. Marean

Curtis W. Marean

Arizona State University

Publications: 18

José María Bermúdez de Castro

José María Bermúdez de Castro

University College London

Publications: 18

Andy I.R. Herries

Andy I.R. Herries

La Trobe University

Publications: 16

Trending Scientists

Robert E. Morgan

Robert E. Morgan

Cardiff University

Michael A. R. Meier

Michael A. R. Meier

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Naoki Asao

Naoki Asao

Shinshu University

Seyyed Mohammad Mousavi

Seyyed Mohammad Mousavi

Tarbiat Modares University

Bjarne O. Braastad

Bjarne O. Braastad

Norwegian University of Life Sciences

William A. Prinz

William A. Prinz

National Institutes of Health

Anne J. Anderson

Anne J. Anderson

Utah State University

Javier Arístegui

Javier Arístegui

University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

Indu Shekhar Thakur

Indu Shekhar Thakur

Jawaharlal Nehru University

Jens Kuhn

Jens Kuhn

University of Cologne

Tapani Hovi

Tapani Hovi

National Institutes of Health

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo

University of California, San Francisco

Alan J. Fischman

Alan J. Fischman

Harvard University

Basil A. Pruitt

Basil A. Pruitt

United States Department of the Army

Scott M. Croom

Scott M. Croom

University of Sydney

Michael W. Werner

Michael W. Werner

California Institute of Technology

Something went wrong. Please try again later.