H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 72 Citations 19,431 211 World Ranking 343 National Ranking 3

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2002 - Member of the National Academy of Sciences

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Archaeology

Juan Luis Arsuaga spends much of his time researching Pleistocene, Paleontology, Homo antecessor, Evolutionary biology and Homo heidelbergensis. His Pleistocene research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Postcrania, Hominidae and Sima. His Paleontology research includes elements of Human evolution and Clade.

His research in Homo antecessor intersects with topics in Genetic algorithm and Cave. His research in Evolutionary biology tackles topics such as Morphology which are related to areas like Morphometrics and Premolar. His biological study deals with issues like Neanderthal, which deal with fields such as Homo sapiens.

His most cited work include:

  • Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians (693 citations)
  • Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Middle Pleistocene cave bear reconstructed from ultrashort DNA fragments (690 citations)
  • Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Middle Pleistocene cave bear reconstructed from ultrashort DNA fragments (690 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His main research concerns Pleistocene, Paleontology, Archaeology, Sima and Evolutionary biology. His studies in Pleistocene integrate themes in fields like Human evolution, Neanderthal and Cave. His work in Paleontology addresses issues such as Hominidae, which are connected to fields such as Zoology.

He regularly links together related areas like Anatomy in his Sima studies. As part of his studies on Evolutionary biology, Juan Luis Arsuaga often connects relevant subjects like Homo sapiens. His Homo antecessor research is classified as research in Early Pleistocene.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Pleistocene (53.21%)
  • Paleontology (40.37%)
  • Archaeology (32.09%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Pleistocene (53.21%)
  • Archaeology (32.09%)
  • Evolutionary biology (21.93%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Pleistocene, Archaeology, Evolutionary biology, Paleontology and Neanderthal. His Pleistocene study combines topics in areas such as Crania, Anatomy, Enamel paint, Sima and Human evolution. His work on Cave, Peninsula, Bronze Age and Chalcolithic as part of general Archaeology study is frequently linked to Context, bridging the gap between disciplines.

He has included themes like Organic matter and Radiocarbon dating in his Cave study. His Evolutionary biology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Homo sapiens, Clade, Homo heidelbergensis and Homo antecessor. The Neanderthal study combines topics in areas such as Mousterian, Homo erectus, Hominidae, Denisovan and Rock shelter.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The earliest modern humans outside Africa (173 citations)
  • New Middle Pleistocene hominin cranium from Gruta da Aroeira (Portugal) (43 citations)
  • New Middle Pleistocene hominin cranium from Gruta da Aroeira (Portugal) (43 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Archaeology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Pleistocene, Paleontology, Archaeology, Sima and Anatomy. His studies deal with areas such as Period, Sedimentary rock, Homo sapiens, Human evolution and Optical dating as well as Pleistocene. His Paleontology research incorporates themes from Crania and Neanderthal.

In his study, Ancient DNA is strongly linked to Hominidae, which falls under the umbrella field of Crania. His Sima research incorporates elements of Broca's area, Anterior dentition, Fossil Record, Adaptation and Endocast. His research investigates the connection between Early Pleistocene and topics such as Homo habilis that intersect with problems in Evolutionary biology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

Iain Mathieson;Iosif Lazaridis;Iosif Lazaridis;Nadin Rohland;Nadin Rohland;Swapan Mallick;Swapan Mallick;Swapan Mallick.
Nature (2015)

918 Citations

Lower Pleistocene hominids and artifacts from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain)

E Carbonell;JM Bermudez de Castro;JL Arsuaga;JC Diez.
Science (1995)

856 Citations

Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Middle Pleistocene cave bear reconstructed from ultrashort DNA fragments

Jesse Dabney;Michael Knapp;Michael Knapp;Isabelle Glocke;Marie-Theres Gansauge.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

839 Citations

A Hominid from the Lower Pleistocene of Atapuerca, Spain: Possible Ancestor to Neandertals and Modern Humans

J. M. Bermúdez de Castro;J. L. Arsuaga;J. L. Arsuaga;E. Carbonell;E. Carbonell;A. Rosas;A. Rosas.
Science (1997)

807 Citations

A mitochondrial genome sequence of a hominin from Sima de los Huesos

Matthias Meyer;Qiaomei Fu;Qiaomei Fu;Ayinuer Aximu-Petri;Isabelle Glocke.
Nature (2014)

488 Citations

The Sima de los Huesos crania (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). A comparative study.

J.L. Arsuaga;J.L. Arsuaga;I. Martı́nez;I. Martı́nez;A. Gracia;A. Gracia;C. Lorenzo;C. Lorenzo.
Journal of Human Evolution (1997)

429 Citations

Earliest humans in Europe: the age of TD6 Gran Dolina, Atapuerca, Spain.

Christophe Falguères;Jean-Jacques Bahain;Yuji Yokoyama;Juan Luis Arsuaga.
Journal of Human Evolution (1999)

416 Citations

Encephalization and allometric trajectories in the genus Homo: Evidence from the Neandertal and modern lineages

Emiliano Bruner;Giorgio Manzi;Juan Luis Arsuaga.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2003)

373 Citations

Comparing Frontal Cranial Profiles in Archaic and Modern Homo by Morphometric Analysis

Fred Bookstein;Katrin Schäfer;Hermann Prossinger;Horst Seidler.
Anatomical Record-advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology (1999)

372 Citations

Nuclear DNA sequences from the Middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins

Matthias Meyer;Juan-Luis Arsuaga;Juan-Luis Arsuaga;Cesare de Filippo;Sarah Nagel.
Nature (2016)

366 Citations

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