D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 51 Citations 15,486 109 World Ranking 9398 National Ranking 158

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Paleontology
  • Anatomy
  • Genus

His primary areas of study are Evolutionary biology, Hominidae, Neanderthal, Anatomy and Genetics. His Evolutionary biology study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Paleontology, Lineage, Human evolutionary genetics and Homo antecessor. As part of his studies on Hominidae, Antonio Rosas often connects relevant subjects like Pleistocene.

His studies in Neanderthal integrate themes in fields like Denisovan and Cave. The Anatomy study combines topics in areas such as Paleoanthropology and Morphometrics. His study looks at the intersection of Genetics and topics like Ancient DNA with Effective population size, Metagenomics and Woolly rhinoceros.

His most cited work include:

  • A Hominid from the Lower Pleistocene of Atapuerca, Spain: Possible Ancestor to Neandertals and Modern Humans (487 citations)
  • The first hominin of Europe (454 citations)
  • Lower Pleistocene hominids and artifacts from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain) (402 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Antonio Rosas mainly investigates Anatomy, Evolutionary biology, Paleontology, Pleistocene and Neanderthal. His Anatomy research includes themes of Homo sapiens, Craniofacial and Morphometrics. His Homo sapiens research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Zoology and Homo antecessor.

His research in Evolutionary biology intersects with topics in Identification, Hominidae and Neanderthal genome project. Many of his studies involve connections with topics such as Cave and Paleontology. His Neanderthal study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Rib cage and Ancient DNA.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Anatomy (31.43%)
  • Evolutionary biology (21.14%)
  • Paleontology (20.57%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2014-2021)?

  • Anatomy (31.43%)
  • Neanderthal (16.57%)
  • Homo sapiens (13.71%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His scientific interests lie mostly in Anatomy, Neanderthal, Homo sapiens, Evolutionary biology and Morphometrics. He interconnects Homo ergaster and Homo antecessor in the investigation of issues within Anatomy. The various areas that Antonio Rosas examines in his Neanderthal study include Pleistocene, Cave, Ancient DNA and Denisovan.

His primary area of study in Pleistocene is in the field of Homo heidelbergensis. He is studying Human evolution, which is a component of Evolutionary biology. His Skeleton research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Juvenile and Hominidae.

Between 2014 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Ancient gene flow from early modern humans into Eastern Neanderthals (249 citations)
  • Neanderthal behaviour, diet, and disease inferred from ancient DNA in dental calculus (203 citations)
  • Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments (149 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Paleontology
  • Anatomy
  • Genus

Antonio Rosas mostly deals with Neanderthal, Anatomy, Evolutionary biology, Morphometrics and Cave. His Neanderthal research incorporates elements of Dental Wear, Denisovan and Tooth wear. His study explores the link between Denisovan and topics such as Hominidae that cross with problems in Paleontology.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Human evolution, Craniofacial and Prognathism. His Evolutionary biology study combines topics in areas such as Genetics, Homo habilis and Primate. Within one scientific family, Antonio Rosas focuses on topics pertaining to Ancient DNA under Cave, and may sometimes address concerns connected to Pleistocene and Woolly rhinoceros.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Lower Pleistocene hominids and artifacts from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain)

E Carbonell;JM Bermudez de Castro;JL Arsuaga;JC Diez.
Science (1995)

856 Citations

A Hominid from the Lower Pleistocene of Atapuerca, Spain: Possible Ancestor to Neandertals and Modern Humans

J. M. Bermúdez de Castro;J. L. Arsuaga;J. L. Arsuaga;E. Carbonell;E. Carbonell;A. Rosas;A. Rosas.
Science (1997)

807 Citations

The Derived FOXP2 Variant of Modern Humans Was Shared with Neandertals

Johannes Krause;Carles Lalueza-Fox;Ludovic Orlando;Wolfgang Enard.
Current Biology (2007)

760 Citations

The first hominin of Europe

Eudald Carbonell;Jose M. Bermudez de Castro;Josep M. Pares;Alfredo Perez-Gonzalez.
Nature (2008)

685 Citations

Targeted retrieval and analysis of five Neandertal mtDNA genomes

Adrian W. Briggs;Jeffrey M. Good;Richard E. Green;Johannes Krause.
Science (2009)

590 Citations

Thin-plate spline analysis of allometry and sexual dimorphism in the human craniofacial complex.

Antonio Rosas;Markus Bastir.
American Journal of Physical Anthropology (2002)

378 Citations

Ancient gene flow from early modern humans into Eastern Neanderthals

Martin Kuhlwilm;Ilan Gronau;Melissa J. Hubisz;Cesare de Filippo.
Nature (2016)

368 Citations

A Melanocortin 1 Receptor Allele Suggests Varying Pigmentation Among Neanderthals

Carles Lalueza-Fox;Holger Römpler;David Caramelli;Claudia Stäubert.
Science (2007)

363 Citations

Neanderthal medics? Evidence for food, cooking, and medicinal plants entrapped in dental calculus

Karen Hardy;Stephen Buckley;Matthew J. Collins;Almudena Estalrrich.
Naturwissenschaften (2012)

354 Citations

Targeted investigation of the Neandertal genome by array-based sequence capture

Hernán A. Burbano;Emily Hodges;Emily Hodges;Richard E. Green;Adrian W. Briggs.
Science (2010)

348 Citations

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