D-Index & Metrics Best Publications
Neuroscience
Australia
2023
Psychology
Australia
2023

D-Index & Metrics D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines.

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 69 Citations 13,240 367 World Ranking 1705 National Ranking 77
Neuroscience D-index 69 Citations 12,788 320 World Ranking 1548 National Ranking 33

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2023 - Research.com Psychology in Australia Leader Award

2023 - Research.com Neuroscience in Australia Leader Award

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Social psychology
  • Nursing
  • Disease

Linda Worrall mostly deals with Aphasia, Rehabilitation, Clinical psychology, Developmental psychology and Physical therapy. In her articles, she combines various disciplines, including Aphasia and Perspective. Her Rehabilitation research incorporates themes from Psychological intervention, Nursing, Quality of life, Gerontology and Audiology.

Her Clinical psychology research incorporates elements of Speech-Language Pathology, Family caregivers, Audiologic Rehabilitation and Behavior change. Her studies in Developmental psychology integrate themes in fields like Older people and Interpersonal relationship. The concepts of her Physical therapy study are interwoven with issues in Physical medicine and rehabilitation, Randomized controlled trial, Emergency medicine, Acute stroke and Internet privacy.

Her most cited work include:

  • What people with aphasia want: their goals according to the ICF (215 citations)
  • Finding a focus for quality of life with aphasia: Social and emotional health, and psychological well-being (187 citations)
  • Designing effective written health education materials: considerations for health professionals. (147 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Her main research concerns Aphasia, Rehabilitation, Physical therapy, Clinical psychology and Stroke. The various areas that Linda Worrall examines in her Aphasia study include Developmental psychology, Physical medicine and rehabilitation, Quality of life and Medical education. Her Medical education study frequently intersects with other fields, such as Evidence-based practice.

She studied Rehabilitation and Audiology that intersect with Older people. Her Physical therapy research includes elements of Intervention, Randomized controlled trial and Gerontology. Her study deals with a combination of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and World health.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Aphasia (56.03%)
  • Rehabilitation (24.62%)
  • Physical therapy (15.58%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Aphasia (56.03%)
  • Rehabilitation (24.62%)
  • Stroke (13.82%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Her primary scientific interests are in Aphasia, Rehabilitation, Stroke, Psychiatry and Medical education. The study incorporates disciplines such as Psychological intervention, Physical medicine and rehabilitation, Intervention and Clinical psychology, Mood in addition to Aphasia. Her work carried out in the field of Intervention brings together such families of science as Speech-Language Pathology and Physical therapy.

She usually deals with Rehabilitation and limits it to topics linked to Family medicine and Cohort study. The Stroke study combines topics in areas such as Developmental psychology, Guideline, Cohort and Medical emergency. Her Medical education study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Context, Evidence-based practice, Delphi method and Best practice.

Between 2015 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF (85 citations)
  • A systematic review of rehabilitation interventions to prevent and treat depression in post-stroke aphasia (44 citations)
  • Which treatment outcomes are most important to aphasia clinicians and managers? An international e-Delphi consensus study (35 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Social psychology
  • Nursing
  • Disease

Her scientific interests lie mostly in Aphasia, Clinical psychology, Rehabilitation, Psychological intervention and Medical education. Her study in Aphasia is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Context, Quality of life, Mood, Stroke and Physical therapy. Her research integrates issues of Developmental psychology, Age differences and Treatment outcome in her study of Clinical psychology.

She has included themes like Conversation, Face and Relationship development in her Rehabilitation study. Her Psychological intervention study deals with Randomized controlled trial intersecting with Caregiver burden. She interconnects Observational study, Active listening and Best practice in the investigation of issues within Medical education.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

What people with aphasia want: their goals according to the ICF

Linda Worrall;Sue Sherratt;Penny Rogers;Tami Howe.
Aphasiology (2011)

407 Citations

Finding a focus for quality of life with aphasia: Social and emotional health, and psychological well-being

Madeline Cruice;Linda Worrall;Louise Hickson;Robert Murison.
Aphasiology (2003)

366 Citations

Designing effective written health education materials: considerations for health professionals.

Tammy Hoffmann;Linda Worrall.
Disability and Rehabilitation (2004)

345 Citations

Social Participation for Older People with Aphasia: The Impact of Communication Disability on Friendships

Bronwyn Davidson;Tami Howe;Linda Worrall;Louise Hickson.
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation (2008)

278 Citations

Clinical Supervision in Four Mental Health Professions: A Review of the Evidence

Susan H. Spence;Jill Wilson;David J. Kavanagh;Jenny Strong.
Behaviour Change (2001)

239 Citations

A randomized controlled trial evaluating the active communication education program for older people with hearing impairment

Louise Hickson;Linda Worrall;Nerina Scarinci.
Ear and Hearing (2007)

231 Citations

Quantifying aphasic people's social lives in the context of non‐aphasic peers

Madeline Cruice;Linda Worrall;Louise Hickson.
Aphasiology (2006)

230 Citations

The effect of hearing impairment in older people on the spouse

Nerina Scarinci;Linda Worrall;Louise Hickson.
International Journal of Audiology (2008)

225 Citations

Nursing the patient with complex communication needs: time as a barrier and a facilitator to successful communication in hospital

Bronwyn Hemsley;Susan Balandin;Linda Worrall.
Journal of Advanced Nursing (2012)

209 Citations

A conceptual review of engagement in healthcare and rehabilitation

Felicity A S Bright;Nicola M Kayes;Linda Worrall;Kathryn M McPherson.
Disability and Rehabilitation (2015)

186 Citations

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