D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Animal Science and Veterinary D-index 23 Citations 2,023 59 World Ranking 1147 National Ranking 82

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Gene
  • Internal medicine

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Zoology, Internal medicine, Endocrinology and Mating. His Ecology study frequently intersects with other fields, such as Animal science. His work in Zoology addresses subjects such as Reproduction, which are connected to disciplines such as Coturnix coturnix.

Kimberly M. Cheng studies Internal medicine, focusing on Quail in particular. His study in the field of Central nervous system and Forebrain also crosses realms of Environmental exposure and Canto. His research in Mating focuses on subjects like Human fertilization, which are connected to Fertility.

His most cited work include:

  • Production performance and egg quality of four strains of laying hens kept in conventional cages and floor pens (136 citations)
  • Elevated Retinal Zeaxanthin and Prevention of Light-Induced Photoreceptor Cell Death in Quail (119 citations)
  • Brodifacoum Poisoning of Avian Scavengers During Rat Control on a Seabird Colony (77 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Quail, Endocrinology, Internal medicine, Zoology and Animal science. The study incorporates disciplines such as Andrology, Vitrification, Cholesterol and Genetics in addition to Quail. He combines subjects such as Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Xanthophyll and Antioxidant with his study of Endocrinology.

His study connects Binding site and Internal medicine. His Zoology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Hatchling, Ecology and Human fertilization. The various areas that Kimberly M. Cheng examines in his Animal science study include Seasonal breeder, Reproduction, Body weight, Yolk and Dromaius novaehollandiae.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Quail (36.61%)
  • Endocrinology (24.11%)
  • Internal medicine (24.11%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2013-2018)?

  • Animal science (19.64%)
  • Quail (36.61%)
  • Microbiome (2.68%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Animal science, Quail, Microbiome, River otter and Welfare. His Animal science study combines topics in areas such as Nutrient supplementation, Surgery, Dromaius novaehollandiae and Creatine kinase. Internal medicine and Endocrinology are all intrinsically tied to his study in Quail.

His work on Sexual maturity as part of general Endocrinology study is frequently linked to Offspring, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of science. His study focuses on the intersection of Microbiome and fields such as Cholesterol with connections in the field of Food science, Pyrosequencing and Genetics. His work carried out in the field of River otter brings together such families of science as Environmental chemistry, Bioaccumulation and Non invasive sampling.

Between 2013 and 2018, his most popular works were:

  • Accumulation of PBDEs in an urban river otter population and an unusual finding of BDE-209 (19 citations)
  • Increased rodenticide exposure rate and risk of toxicosis in barn owls (Tyto alba) from southwestern Canada and linkage with demographic but not genetic factors (17 citations)
  • Assessment of toxicity and coagulopathy of brodifacoum in Japanese quail and testing in wild owls (13 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Ecology
  • Internal medicine

Kimberly M. Cheng focuses on River otter, Quail, Rodenticide, Endocrine disruptor and Polybrominated diphenyl ethers. His study in River otter is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Lontra, Habitat and Wildlife. His Quail research includes elements of Genetics, Food science and Pyrosequencing.

He has included themes like Zoology, Intraspecific competition, Population decline and Barn-owl in his Rodenticide study. His work in Endocrine disruptor incorporates the disciplines of Non invasive sampling, Bioaccumulation, Environmental chemistry and Animal science.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Production performance and egg quality of four strains of laying hens kept in conventional cages and floor pens

R. Singh;K. M. Cheng;F. G. Silversides.
Poultry Science (2009)

242 Citations

Elevated Retinal Zeaxanthin and Prevention of Light-Induced Photoreceptor Cell Death in Quail

Lauren R. Thomson;Lauren R. Thomson;Yoko Toyoda;Andrea Langner;Francois C. Delori.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (2002)

178 Citations

Brodifacoum Poisoning of Avian Scavengers During Rat Control on a Seabird Colony

G. R. Howald;P. Mineau;J. E. Elliott;K. M. Cheng.
Ecotoxicology (1999)

114 Citations

Long term dietary supplementation with zeaxanthin reduces photoreceptor death in light-damaged Japanese quail.

Lauren R. Thomson;Lauren R. Thomson;Yoko Toyoda;Francois C. Delori;Kevin M. Garnett.
Experimental Eye Research (2002)

113 Citations

Forced copulation in captive mallards. I. Fertilization of eggs.

J. T. Burns;K. M. Cheng;F. McKinney.
The Auk (1980)

110 Citations

Assessment of biological effects of chlorinated hydrocarbons in osprey chicks

John E. Elliott;John E. Elliott;Laurie K. Wilson;Charles J. Henny;Suzanne F. Trudeau.
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (2001)

98 Citations

Dioxin contamination and growth and development in great blue heron embryos.

L E Hart;K M Cheng;P E Whitehead;R M Shah.
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health (1991)

97 Citations

Chromoplasts ultrastructure and estimated carotene content in root secondary phloem of different carrot varieties

Ji Eun Kim;Kim H. Rensing;Carl J. Douglas;Kimberly M. Cheng.
Planta (2010)

96 Citations

Biological effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls in double-crested cormorant chicks (Phalacrocorax auritus).

Sanderson Jt;Norstrom Rj;Elliott Je;Hart Le.
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health (1994)

96 Citations

Effect of dietary zeaxanthin on tissue distribution of zeaxanthin and lutein in quail.

Yoko Toyoda;Lauren R. Thomson;Andrea Langner;Neal E. Craft.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (2002)

94 Citations

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Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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