H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Social Sciences and Humanities H-index 101 Citations 41,433 158 World Ranking 20 National Ranking 14

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2014 - Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

2002 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Law
  • Statistics
  • Social psychology

Daniel S. Nagin mainly focuses on Injury prevention, Developmental psychology, Social psychology, Criminology and Human factors and ergonomics. His study in Suicide prevention extends to Injury prevention with its themes. His work on Child abuse as part of general Suicide prevention research is often related to Occupational safety and health, Dysfunctional family and Clinical psychology, thus linking different fields of science.

His study on Conduct disorder and Juvenile delinquency is often connected to Series as part of broader study in Developmental psychology. The Social psychology study combines topics in areas such as Panel data, Sample and Impulsivity. His Criminology research includes themes of Social relation, Attitude change and Sanctions.

His most cited work include:

  • Group-based modeling of development (1898 citations)
  • Analyzing developmental trajectories: A semiparametric, group-based approach (1763 citations)
  • A SAS procedure based on mixture models for estimating developmental trajectories (1638 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary scientific interests are in Developmental psychology, Criminology, Injury prevention, Aggression and Social psychology. He interconnects Longitudinal study and El Niño in the investigation of issues within Developmental psychology. His work on Criminology is being expanded to include thematically relevant topics such as Sanctions.

Daniel S. Nagin studied Injury prevention and Human factors and ergonomics that intersect with Suicide prevention. His research integrates issues of Early childhood and Clinical psychology in his study of Aggression. His research is interdisciplinary, bridging the disciplines of Sample and Social psychology.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Developmental psychology (20.73%)
  • Criminology (18.29%)
  • Injury prevention (15.85%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2013-2021)?

  • Criminology (18.29%)
  • Demography (7.72%)
  • Injury prevention (15.85%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Criminology, Demography, Injury prevention, Law and Clinical psychology. His Criminology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Certainty and Disease course. His work carried out in the field of Demography brings together such families of science as Cohort study, Anxiety, Aggression, Prosocial behavior and Socioeconomic status.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Earnings and Longitudinal study. Injury prevention is connected with Occupational safety and health and Early childhood in his study. He has researched Clinical psychology in several fields, including Mental health, Child and adolescent psychiatry, Developmental psychology and Comorbidity.

Between 2013 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Group-based multi-trajectory modeling. (151 citations)
  • Group-based trajectory modeling: an overview. (135 citations)
  • Childhood to Early-Midlife Systolic Blood Pressure Trajectories: Early-Life Predictors, Effect Modifiers, and Adult Cardiovascular Outcomes. (130 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Law
  • Statistics
  • Social psychology

Daniel S. Nagin focuses on Injury prevention, Suicide prevention, Group based, Human factors and ergonomics and Occupational safety and health. Among his Injury prevention studies, there is a synthesis of other scientific areas such as Clinical psychology, Developmental psychology and Aggression. His studies deal with areas such as Longitudinal study, Child development, Mental health, Early childhood and Comorbidity as well as Clinical psychology.

His Human factors and ergonomics studies intersect with other subjects such as Imprisonment and Medical emergency. The study incorporates disciplines such as Computer security, Juvenile delinquency, Life course approach and Demographic economics in addition to Imprisonment. The Trajectory study combines topics in areas such as Developmental stage theories, Data science and Disease course.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Group-based modeling of development

Daniel S. Nagin.
(2005)

3536 Citations

Analyzing developmental trajectories: A semiparametric, group-based approach

Daniel S. Nagin.
Psychological Methods (1999)

2589 Citations

Developmental Trajectories of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors and Adolescent Delinquency: A Six-Site, Cross-National Study

Lisa M. Broidy;Daniel S. Nagin;Richard E. Tremblay;John E. Bates.
Developmental Psychology (2003)

2251 Citations

A SAS procedure based on mixture models for estimating developmental trajectories

Bobby L. Jones;Daniel S. Nagin;Kathryn Roeder.
Sociological Methods & Research (2001)

2110 Citations

Trajectories of boys' physical aggression, opposition, and hyperactivity on the path to physically violent and nonviolent juvenile delinquency.

Daniel Nagin;Richard E. Tremblay.
Child Development (1999)

1816 Citations

Trajectories of change in criminal offending: Good marriages and the desistance process.

John H. Laub;Daniel S. Nagin;Robert J. Sampson.
American Sociological Review (1998)

1503 Citations

Physical aggression during early childhood: trajectories and predictors.

Richard E. Tremblay;Daniel S. Nagin;Jean R. Seguin;M. Zoccolillo.
The Canadian child and adolescent psychiatry review = La revue canadienne de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent (2005)

1496 Citations

Criminal Deterrence Research at the Outset of the Twenty-First Century

Daniel S. Nagin.
Crime and Justice (1998)

1391 Citations

AGE, CRIMINAL CAREERS, AND POPULATION HETEROGENEITY: SPECIFICATION AND ESTIMATION OF A NONPARAMETRIC, MIXED POISSON MODEL*

Daniel S. Nagin;Kenneth C. Land.
Criminology (1993)

1297 Citations

Group-Based Trajectory Modeling in Clinical Research

Daniel S. Nagin;Candice L. Odgers.
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology (2010)

1227 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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