H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology H-index 37 Citations 4,621 110 World Ranking 5403 National Ranking 543

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Cognition
  • Social psychology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Meal, Developmental psychology, Social psychology, Appetite and Food intake. In general Meal study, his work on Sensory-specific satiety often relates to the realm of Demography, thereby connecting several areas of interest. His Developmental psychology research focuses on subjects like Dietary behavior, which are linked to Dietary control, Saliva and Disinhibition.

His work in Appetite tackles topics such as Palatability which are related to areas like Chocolate milk, Animal science, Food products, Flavor and Taste. His Food intake research includes themes of Food science and Eating behavior. He is involved in the study of Food science that focuses on Expected satiety in particular.

His most cited work include:

  • Measuring ‘expected satiety’ in a range of common foods using a method of constant stimuli (171 citations)
  • How Many Calories Are on Our Plate? Expected Fullness, Not Liking, Determines Meal‐size Selection (140 citations)
  • 'I just can't help myself': effects of food-cue exposure in overweight and lean individuals. (132 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Jeffrey M. Brunstrom mostly deals with Meal, Developmental psychology, Food science, Social psychology and Food intake. His study in Meal is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Feeding behavior, Obesity, Appetite and Palatability. His research in Appetite intersects with topics in Selection and Animal science.

His Developmental psychology study incorporates themes from Conditioning, Cognition, Flavour, Snack food and Associative learning. Many of his studies on Food science apply to Affect as well. Within one scientific family, Jeffrey M. Brunstrom focuses on topics pertaining to Expected satiety under Social psychology, and may sometimes address concerns connected to Calorie.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Meal (30.23%)
  • Developmental psychology (21.86%)
  • Food science (17.21%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Meal (30.23%)
  • Food choice (11.63%)
  • Demography (14.42%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Meal, Food choice, Demography, Obesity and Food intake are his primary areas of study. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Social psychology, Flavour and Healthy eating. His research in Obesity tackles topics such as Developmental psychology which are related to areas like Episodic memory.

Jeffrey M. Brunstrom focuses mostly in the field of Food intake, narrowing it down to matters related to Environmental health and, in some cases, Palatability, Clinical nutrition and Plant protein. He works mostly in the field of Impulsivity, limiting it down to concerns involving Between meals and, occasionally, Expected satiety. His work is dedicated to discovering how Weight loss, Calorie restriction are connected with Appetite and other disciplines.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The determinants of food choice (90 citations)
  • Protein for Life: Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults (71 citations)
  • Undervalued and ignored: Are humans poorly adapted to energy-dense foods? (26 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Cognition
  • Social psychology

His primary scientific interests are in Meal, Food choice, Food intake, Obesity and Clinical psychology. The Meal study combines topics in areas such as Snack food, Mindfulness and Episodic memory. His work in the fields of Expected satiety overlaps with other areas such as Visual estimation.

His Obesity research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Body mass index, Communication, Randomized controlled trial, Feeding behavior and Self report. The concepts of his Clinical psychology study are interwoven with issues in Social influence and Strictly standardized mean difference, Meta-analysis. His Affect research integrates issues from Sarcopenia, Food science, Calorie and Malnutrition.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Measuring ‘expected satiety’ in a range of common foods using a method of constant stimuli

Jeffrey M. Brunstrom;Nicholas G. Shakeshaft;Nicholas E. Scott-Samuel.
Appetite (2008)

204 Citations

Measuring affective (liking) and non-affective (expected satiety) determinants of portion size and food reward.

Jeffrey Michael Brunstrom;Nicholas G Shakeshaft.
Appetite (2009)

176 Citations

How Many Calories Are on Our Plate? Expected Fullness, Not Liking, Determines Meal‐size Selection

Jeffrey Michael Brunstrom;Peter J Rogers.
Obesity (2009)

175 Citations

Playing a computer game during lunch affects fullness, memory for lunch, and later snack intake

Rose E Oldham-Cooper;Charlotte A Hardman;Charlotte E Nicoll;Peter J Rogers.
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2011)

175 Citations

'I just can't help myself': effects of food-cue exposure in overweight and lean individuals.

D Ferriday;J M Brunstrom.
International Journal of Obesity (2011)

171 Citations

Acute sleep deprivation increases portion size and affects food choice in young men.

Pleunie S. Hogenkamp;Emil Nilsson;Victor C. Nilsson;Colin D. Chapman.
Psychoneuroendocrinology (2013)

150 Citations

Effects of distraction on the development of satiety

Jeffrey Michael Brunstrom;GL Mitchell.
British Journal of Nutrition (2006)

148 Citations

Texture, not flavor, determines expected satiation of dairy products

Pleunie S. Hogenkamp;Annette Stafleu;Monica Mars;Jeffrey Michael Brunstrom.
Appetite (2011)

132 Citations

How does food-cue exposure lead to larger meal sizes?

Danielle Ferriday;Jeffrey Michael Brunstrom.
British Journal of Nutrition (2008)

127 Citations

Cognitive biases to healthy and unhealthy food words predict change in BMI.

Raff Calitri;Emmanuel M. Pothos;Katy Tapper;Jeffrey M. Brunstrom.
Obesity (2010)

126 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

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