D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 60 Citations 13,918 127 World Ranking 5376 National Ranking 2576

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Enzyme
  • Internal medicine

His primary areas of study are Mast cell, Tryptase, Molecular biology, Chymase and Biochemistry. He has researched Mast cell in several fields, including Internal medicine, Degranulation, Endocrinology and Cell biology. Tryptase is the subject of his research, which falls under Immunology.

His Immunology study combines topics in areas such as Cancer research and Calcitonin receptor. The various areas that George H. Caughey examines in his Molecular biology study include Restriction map, Vasoactive intestinal peptide, Complementary DNA, Gene and Receptor. His study looks at the intersection of Chymase and topics like Cleavage with Extracellular, Angiotensin II, Enzyme and Protein precursor.

His most cited work include:

  • Inflammatory mast cells up-regulate angiogenesis during squamous epithelial carcinogenesis (832 citations)
  • Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor 2 induce inflammation by a neurogenic mechanism. (796 citations)
  • Mast cell tryptase is a mitogen for cultured fibroblasts. (354 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Tryptase, Mast cell, Immunology, Biochemistry and Molecular biology. His Tryptase study also includes

  • Endocrinology which intersects with area such as Vasoactive intestinal peptide,
  • Cell biology together with Epidermal growth factor. His Chymase study in the realm of Mast cell connects with subjects such as Stem cell factor.

His work carried out in the field of Chymase brings together such families of science as Cancer research and Cathepsin G. Pathology is closely connected to Lung in his research, which is encompassed under the umbrella topic of Immunology. His work in Molecular biology tackles topics such as Mastocytoma which are related to areas like Mast cell sarcoma.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Tryptase (44.51%)
  • Mast cell (40.85%)
  • Immunology (43.90%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2011-2019)?

  • Immunology (43.90%)
  • Tryptase (44.51%)
  • Lung (13.41%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

George H. Caughey mainly investigates Immunology, Tryptase, Lung, Proteases and Lung transplantation. His work on Mast cell and Inflammation is typically connected to Acute cellular rejection as part of general Immunology study, connecting several disciplines of science. He studied Mast cell and Histamine that intersect with Microbiology and Secretion.

His research links Smooth muscle with Tryptase. His Proteases research is classified as research in Biochemistry. His research integrates issues of Elastase, Chymase, Molecular biology and Proteinase 3 in his study of Cathepsin C.

Between 2011 and 2019, his most popular works were:

  • Elevated basal serum tryptase identifies a multisystem disorder associated with increased TPSAB1 copy number. (120 citations)
  • Elevated basal serum tryptase identifies a multisystem disorder associated with increased TPSAB1 copy number. (120 citations)
  • Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets. (74 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Enzyme
  • Internal medicine

George H. Caughey mainly focuses on Immunology, Mast cell, Tryptase, Histamine and Proteases. His studies deal with areas such as Lung transplantation, Bronchiolitis obliterans, Lung and Basal as well as Immunology. His Mast cell research includes themes of Inflammation, Humanized mouse, Asthma, Biomarker and Allosteric regulation.

The study incorporates disciplines such as Irritable bowel syndrome and Connective tissue in addition to Tryptase. The Histamine study combines topics in areas such as Cathepsin, Chymase, Microbiology and Cathepsin G. In general Proteases study, his work on Cathepsin C often relates to the realm of Interleukin 13, thereby connecting several areas of interest.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Inflammatory mast cells up-regulate angiogenesis during squamous epithelial carcinogenesis

Lisa M. Coussens;Wilfred W. Raymond;Gabriele Bergers;Marion Laig-Webster.
Genes & Development (1999)

1291 Citations

Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor 2 induce inflammation by a neurogenic mechanism.

M Steinhoff;N Vergnolle;S H Young;M Tognetto.
Nature Medicine (2000)

1000 Citations

Mast cell tryptase is a mitogen for cultured fibroblasts.

Stephen J. Ruoss;Thomas Hartmann;George H. Caughey.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (1991)

543 Citations

Mast Cell Tryptases and Chymases in Inflammation and Host Defense

George H. Caughey.
Immunological Reviews (2007)

458 Citations

Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide degradation by mast cell tryptase and chymase.

G H Caughey;F Leidig;N F Viro;J A Nadel.
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (1988)

435 Citations

Neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G stimulate secretion from cultured bovine airway gland serous cells.

C P Sommerhoff;J A Nadel;C B Basbaum;G H Caughey.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (1990)

428 Citations

Mast cell tryptase regulates rat colonic myocytes through proteinase-activated receptor 2.

Carlos U. Corvera;Olivier Déry;K. McConalogue;Stephan K. Böhm.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (1997)

405 Citations

Degradation of airway neuropeptides by human lung tryptase.

Elizabeth K. Tam;George H. Caughey.
American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (1990)

305 Citations

Canine Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors: Cloning and Expression of the A3 Receptor and Evidence that Degranulation Is Mediated by the A2B Receptor

John A. Auchampach;Xiaowei Jin;Tina C. Wan;George H. Caughey.
Molecular Pharmacology (1997)

290 Citations

Mast cell tryptase causes airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness in dogs.

K Sekizawa;G H Caughey;S C Lazarus;W M Gold.
Journal of Clinical Investigation (1989)

263 Citations

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