H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Medicine D-index 122 Citations 55,158 531 World Ranking 1395 National Ranking 841

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Disease
  • Alzheimer's disease

His scientific interests lie mostly in Alzheimer's disease, Pathology, Dementia, Frontotemporal dementia and Internal medicine. The various areas that Bradley F. Boeve examines in his Alzheimer's disease study include Cognitive impairment, Positron emission tomography, Neuroimaging, Neuroscience and Temporal lobe. As part of his studies on Pathology, Bradley F. Boeve often connects relevant areas like Magnetic resonance imaging.

His Dementia research incorporates elements of Psychiatry, Cohort study, Pediatrics and Parkinsonism. His research in Frontotemporal dementia intersects with topics in Genetics and Tau protein. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Oncology, Depression and Cardiology.

His most cited work include:

  • Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in noncoding region of C9ORF72 causes chromosome 9p-linked FTD and ALS (3097 citations)
  • Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. (2546 citations)
  • Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants (2532 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His main research concerns Dementia, Pathology, Internal medicine, Disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. Bradley F. Boeve has researched Dementia in several fields, including Psychiatry, Cognition, Parkinsonism, Pediatrics and Cohort. His study in Alzheimer's disease, Atrophy, Frontotemporal dementia and Neurofibrillary tangle is carried out as part of his studies in Pathology.

His Alzheimer's disease research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Apolipoprotein E and Central nervous system disease, Degenerative disease. Bradley F. Boeve has included themes like Genetics and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in his Frontotemporal dementia study. His Dementia with Lewy bodies study incorporates themes from Lewy body, REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Dementia (29.60%)
  • Pathology (28.09%)
  • Internal medicine (19.54%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Dementia (29.60%)
  • Internal medicine (19.54%)
  • Frontotemporal dementia (18.50%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Bradley F. Boeve spends much of his time researching Dementia, Internal medicine, Frontotemporal dementia, Disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. Dementia is a subfield of Pathology that Bradley F. Boeve studies. The Pathology study combines topics in areas such as Magnetic resonance imaging and Temporal lobe.

His Frontotemporal dementia study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Psychiatry, Asymptomatic and Neuropsychology. His work deals with themes such as Stage, Genetics, Neuroscience and Pediatrics, which intersect with Disease. As a part of the same scientific study, Bradley F. Boeve usually deals with the Dementia with Lewy bodies, concentrating on REM sleep behavior disorder and frequently concerns with Parkinsonism.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Risk and predictors of dementia and parkinsonism in idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder: a multicentre study (199 citations)
  • Autoimmune encephalitis epidemiology and a comparison to infectious encephalitis. (176 citations)
  • Diagnostic value of plasma phosphorylated tau181 in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. (123 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Disease
  • Gene

Bradley F. Boeve focuses on Dementia, Pathology, Frontotemporal dementia, Disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. Bradley F. Boeve combines subjects such as Alzheimer's disease, Neurofibrillary tangle, Hippocampus, Neuroscience and Tauopathy with his study of Dementia. His Pathology study combines topics in areas such as Magnetic resonance imaging, Neuroimaging and Temporal lobe.

His Frontotemporal dementia research includes themes of Tau protein and Asymptomatic. His Dementia with Lewy bodies research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Lewy body, REM sleep behavior disorder, Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonism. His Internal medicine research incorporates themes from Gastroenterology, Depression and Cardiology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in noncoding region of C9ORF72 causes chromosome 9p-linked FTD and ALS

Mariely DeJesus-Hernandez;Ian R. Mackenzie;Bradley F. Boeve;Adam L. Boxer.
Neuron (2011)

3949 Citations

Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants

M L Gorno-Tempini;M L Gorno-Tempini;A E Hillis;S Weintraub;A Kertesz.
Neurology (2011)

3337 Citations

Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia.

Katya Rascovsky;John R. Hodges;David Knopman;Mario F. Mendez.
Brain (2011)

3292 Citations

Prediction of AD with MRI-based hippocampal volume in mild cognitive impairment

Clifford R. Jack;Ronald C. Petersen;Yue Cheng Xu;Peter C. O'Brien.
Neurology (1999)

1882 Citations

Mutations in progranulin cause tau-negative frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17

Matt Baker;Ian R. Mackenzie;Stuart M. Pickering-Brown;Jennifer Gass.
Nature (2006)

1860 Citations

Common variants at MS4A4/MS4A6E , CD2AP , CD33 and EPHA1 are associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Adam C. Naj;Gyungah Jun;Gary W. Beecham;Li-San Wang.
Nature Genetics (2011)

1580 Citations

Diagnosis and management of dementia with Lewy bodies Fourth consensus report of the DLB Consortium

Ian G. McKeith;Bradley F. Boeve;Dennis W. DIckson;Glenda Halliday.
Neurology (2017)

1504 Citations

Mild cognitive impairment: ten years later.

Ronald Carl Petersen;Rosebud O Roberts;David S Knopman;Bradley F Boeve.
JAMA Neurology (2009)

1440 Citations

Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: demographic, clinical and laboratory findings in 93 cases.

Eric J. Olson;Bradley F. Boeve;Michael H. Silber.
Brain (2000)

1087 Citations

Serial PIB and MRI in normal, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: implications for sequence of pathological events in Alzheimer's disease.

Clifford R. Jack Jr.;Val J. Lowe;Stephen D Weigand;Heather J. Wiste.
Brain (2009)

1069 Citations

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