H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Chemistry D-index 64 Citations 14,841 244 World Ranking 3755 National Ranking 1307

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Enzyme
  • Gene
  • DNA

His primary areas of investigation include Nuclear magnetic resonance, Nuclear Overhauser effect, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, RNA and In vivo. His work in the fields of Relaxation overlaps with other areas such as Upper and lower bounds. His Nuclear Overhauser effect research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Proton NMR, Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Analytical chemistry.

His Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study is focused on Stereochemistry in general. RNA is a subfield of Biochemistry that Thomas L. James tackles. Thomas L. James has included themes like Surface coil, Cytosol, Pathology, Phosphocreatine and Metabolism in his In vivo study.

His most cited work include:

  • Structure and mechanism (807 citations)
  • Structure of the recombinant full-length hamster prion protein PrP(29-231): the N terminus is highly flexible. (597 citations)
  • DOCK 6: Combining techniques to model RNA–small molecule complexes (491 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary scientific interests are in Nuclear magnetic resonance, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Nuclear Overhauser effect, Biochemistry and Stereochemistry. The study incorporates disciplines such as Spin echo, Magnetic resonance imaging and In vivo in addition to Nuclear magnetic resonance. His research in In vivo tackles topics such as Phosphocreatine which are related to areas like Metabolite.

His research in Nuclear Overhauser effect intersects with topics in Crystallography, Analytical chemistry, Molecular physics and Molecular dynamics. His research on Biochemistry often connects related areas such as Biophysics. His study in Stereochemistry is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both RNA and DNA.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (25.64%)
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (16.41%)
  • Nuclear Overhauser effect (15.13%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 1999-2016)?

  • RNA (11.54%)
  • Biochemistry (16.15%)
  • Stereochemistry (14.87%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns RNA, Biochemistry, Stereochemistry, Crystallography and DNA. Thomas L. James has researched RNA in several fields, including Base pair, Nucleic acid and Virtual screening, Docking. He works mostly in the field of Biochemistry, limiting it down to topics relating to Biophysics and, in certain cases, Hamster and Conformational isomerism.

His work in the fields of Stereochemistry, such as Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, overlaps with other areas such as Ligand. His work carried out in the field of Crystallography brings together such families of science as Dihedral angle, Relaxation, Residual dipolar coupling, Nuclear Overhauser effect and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of nucleic acids. His DNA research integrates issues from KH domain, RNA-binding protein, Binding protein and Molecular biology.

Between 1999 and 2016, his most popular works were:

  • DOCK 6: Combining techniques to model RNA–small molecule complexes (491 citations)
  • Perspectives on NMR in drug discovery: a technique comes of age (297 citations)
  • Locally disordered conformer of the hamster prion protein: a crucial intermediate to PrPSc? (137 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Enzyme
  • Gene
  • DNA

Thomas L. James mainly investigates RNA, Biochemistry, Stereochemistry, Biophysics and Binding site. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Ribosomal RNA, Base pair, Nucleic acid and Docking. His work on Hiv 1 tat and Hydrophobic effect is typically connected to Tar and Low toxicity as part of general Biochemistry study, connecting several disciplines of science.

His biological study focuses on Nuclear Overhauser effect. His Biophysics research incorporates themes from Protein structure, Conformational isomerism, Protein tertiary structure and Hamster. His research integrates issues of Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Saturation transfer, Virtual screening and Solvent in his study of Binding site.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Structure and mechanism

Norman J. Oppenheimer;Thomas L. James.
(1989)

1271 Citations

Structure of the recombinant full-length hamster prion protein PrP(29-231): the N terminus is highly flexible.

Donne Dg;Viles Jh;Groth D;Mehlhorn I.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1997)

834 Citations

Evidence for protein X binding to a discontinuous epitope on the cellular prion protein during scrapie prion propagation

Kiyotoshi Kaneko;Laurence Zulianello;Michael Scott;Carol M. Cooper.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1997)

677 Citations

DOCK 6: Combining techniques to model RNA–small molecule complexes

P. Therese Lang;Scott R. Brozell;Sudipto Mukherjee;Eric F. Pettersen.
RNA (2009)

654 Citations

A theoretical study of distance determinations from NMR. Two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectra

Joe W Keepers;Thomas L James.
Journal of Magnetic Resonance (1984)

643 Citations

CHAPTER 2 – PRINCIPLES OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

Thomas L. James.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biochemistry (1975)

621 Citations

Solution structure of a 142-residue recombinant prion protein corresponding to the infectious fragment of the scrapie isoform.

Thomas L. James;He Liu;Nikolai B. Ulyanov;Shauna Farr-Jones.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1997)

576 Citations

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biochemistry

Thomas L. James.
(1975)

501 Citations

A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

D Peretz;R A Williamson;Y Matsunaga;H Serban.
Journal of Molecular Biology (1997)

427 Citations

Perspectives on NMR in drug discovery: a technique comes of age

Maurizio Pellecchia;Ivano Bertini;David Cowburn;Claudio Dalvit.
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery (2008)

378 Citations

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