D-Index & Metrics Best Publications
Research.com 2022 Best Female Scientist Award Badge

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 106 Citations 33,530 288 World Ranking 217 National Ranking 133
Best female scientists D-index 113 Citations 36,692 452 World Ranking 458 National Ranking 282

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2022 - Research.com Best Female Scientist Award

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Audiology

Audiology, Perception, Speech perception, Cognition and Stimulus are her primary areas of study. Her research in Audiology intersects with topics in Formant, Sensory system and Frequency following response. Her studies in Perception integrate themes in fields like Neurophysiology, Cognitive psychology, Hearing loss, Learning disability and Auditory display.

Her Speech perception research includes elements of Noise, Background noise, Event-related potential and Auditory perception. Her Cognition research integrates issues from Neuroplasticity, Dyslexia and Perceptual learning. Nina Kraus combines subjects such as Mismatch negativity and Speech recognition with her study of Stimulus.

Her most cited work include:

  • Musical experience shapes human brainstem encoding of linguistic pitch patterns (687 citations)
  • Music training for the development of auditory skills (652 citations)
  • Auditory brain stem response to complex sounds: a tutorial. (515 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Her primary scientific interests are in Audiology, Speech perception, Perception, Cognitive psychology and Stimulus. Her Audiology study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Mismatch negativity and Brainstem. Her work on Neurocomputational speech processing is typically connected to QUIET as part of general Speech perception study, connecting several disciplines of science.

Her research in Perception intersects with topics in Background noise, Active listening, Communication and Speech recognition, Speech processing. Her study explores the link between Cognitive psychology and topics such as Cognition that cross with problems in Sensory system and Neuroplasticity. Her research on Stimulus focuses in particular on Frequency following response.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Audiology (48.74%)
  • Speech perception (23.11%)
  • Perception (21.51%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2014-2021)?

  • Audiology (48.74%)
  • Cognitive psychology (17.85%)
  • Frequency following response (7.55%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Her primary areas of investigation include Audiology, Cognitive psychology, Frequency following response, Cognition and Active listening. Her study on Audiology is mostly dedicated to connecting different topics, such as Stimulus. Her Stimulus study incorporates themes from Communication and Brainstem.

Her Cognitive psychology research incorporates elements of Beat, Speech perception, Rhythm and Reading. Her research integrates issues of Developmental psychology and Sensation in her study of Cognition. Her work carried out in the field of Active listening brings together such families of science as Perception, Auditory scene analysis, Speech recognition, Noise and Melody.

Between 2014 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Stability and Plasticity of Auditory Brainstem Function Across the Lifespan (118 citations)
  • Unraveling the Biology of Auditory Learning: A Cognitive–Sensorimotor–Reward Framework (88 citations)
  • Music training alters the course of adolescent auditory development (85 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Internal medicine

Her scientific interests lie mostly in Cognitive psychology, Audiology, Cognition, Speech perception and Audio signal processing. Her study in Cognitive psychology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Active listening, Inhibitory control, Musical, Reading and Beat. Nina Kraus has included themes like Stimulus, Frequency following response and Brainstem in her Audiology study.

Her work investigates the relationship between Stimulus and topics such as Auditory brainstem response that intersect with problems in Amusia and Neural correlates of consciousness. Her biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Developmental psychology, Auditory system, Sensory system and Sensation. Her study with Speech perception involves better knowledge in Perception.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Music training for the development of auditory skills

Nina Kraus;Bharath Chandrasekaran.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2010)

1110 Citations

Musical experience shapes human brainstem encoding of linguistic pitch patterns

Patrick C M Wong;Erika Skoe;Nicole M Russo;Tasha Dees.
Nature Neuroscience (2007)

1036 Citations

Auditory brain stem response to complex sounds: a tutorial.

Erika Skoe;Nina Kraus.
Ear and Hearing (2010)

732 Citations

Musicians have enhanced subcortical auditory and audiovisual processing of speech and music

Gabriella Musacchia;Mikko Sams;Erika Skoe;Nina Kraus.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007)

686 Citations

Auditory Neurophysiologic Responses and Discrimination Deficits in Children with Learning Problems

Nina Kraus;Therese J. McGee;Thomas D. Carrell;Steven G. Zecker.
Science (1996)

677 Citations

Musician enhancement for speech-in-noise.

Alexandra Parbery-Clark;Erika Skoe;Carrie Lam;Nina Kraus.
Ear and Hearing (2009)

547 Citations

Central auditory plasticity: changes in the N1-P2 complex after speech-sound training.

Kelly Tremblay;Nina Kraus;Therese McGee;Curtis Ponton.
Ear and Hearing (2001)

522 Citations

The scalp‐recorded brainstem response to speech: Neural origins and plasticity

Bharath Chandrasekaran;Nina Kraus.
Psychophysiology (2010)

434 Citations

Speaking clearly for children with learning disabilities: sentence perception in noise.

Ann R. Bradlow;Nina Kraus;Erin Hayes.
Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research (2003)

430 Citations

Musical Experience Limits the Degradative Effects of Background Noise on the Neural Processing of Sound

Alexandra Parbery-Clark;Erika Skoe;Nina Kraus.
The Journal of Neuroscience (2009)

429 Citations

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