H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Environmental Sciences H-index 70 Citations 15,310 241 World Ranking 612 National Ranking 313

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

1996 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

1995 - Fellow of American Geophysical Union (AGU)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Meteorology
  • Astronomy
  • Atmosphere of Earth

His primary areas of study are Stratosphere, Atmospheric sciences, Environmental science, Climatology and Polar vortex. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Atmosphere of Earth, Aerosol, Geopotential height, Water vapor and Radiative transfer. His Atmospheric sciences study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Ozone and Polar.

His research in Climatology focuses on subjects like Latitude, which are connected to Mean flow and Eddy. His study in Polar vortex is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Potential vorticity and Polar meteorology. His research in Meteorology intersects with topics in Satellite and Remote sensing.

His most cited work include:

  • An objective determination of the polar vortex using Ertel's potential vorticity (461 citations)
  • Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011 (427 citations)
  • Nimbus 7 satellite measurements of the springtime Antarctic ozone decrease (357 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Atmospheric sciences, Stratosphere, Environmental science, Climatology and Ozone. The Atmospheric sciences study which covers Water vapor that intersects with Convection. Mark R. Schoeberl usually deals with Stratosphere and limits it to topics linked to Potential vorticity and Potential temperature.

Meteorology, Satellite, Microwave Limb Sounder, Aerosol and Atmosphere are fields of study that overlap with his Environmental science research. His Meteorology research incorporates themes from Lidar and Remote sensing. The various areas that Mark R. Schoeberl examines in his Vortex study include Geophysics and Mixing ratio.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Atmospheric sciences (71.47%)
  • Stratosphere (57.05%)
  • Environmental science (54.55%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2007-2021)?

  • Environmental science (54.55%)
  • Atmospheric sciences (71.47%)
  • Stratosphere (57.05%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Mark R. Schoeberl mainly focuses on Environmental science, Atmospheric sciences, Stratosphere, Meteorology and Troposphere. His Atmospheric sciences research focuses on Water vapor and how it relates to Humidity. His Stratosphere research is under the purview of Climatology.

His research in Climatology tackles topics such as Atmosphere which are related to areas like Forcing. As a member of one scientific family, he mostly works in the field of Meteorology, focusing on Remote sensing and, on occasion, Geostationary orbit. His Troposphere study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Cirrus, Air quality index, Cloud fraction and Gravitational wave, Gravity wave.

Between 2007 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011 (427 citations)
  • Stratospheric water vapor feedback (148 citations)
  • Planning, implementation, and first results of the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4) (100 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Meteorology
  • Astronomy
  • Atmosphere of Earth

Mark R. Schoeberl focuses on Environmental science, Atmospheric sciences, Stratosphere, Meteorology and Climatology. His biological study deals with issues like Aerosol, which deal with fields such as Ice cloud. Mark R. Schoeberl combines subjects such as Atmospheric circulation and Atmospheric chemistry with his study of Stratosphere.

Mark R. Schoeberl interconnects Dry season and Satellite in the investigation of issues within Meteorology. His Climatology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Atmosphere and Water vapor. His Ozone depletion study incorporates themes from Atmospheric model and Altitude.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011

Gloria L. Manney;Gloria L. Manney;Michelle L. Santee;Markus Rex;Nathaniel J. Livesey.
Nature (2011)

688 Citations

An objective determination of the polar vortex using Ertel's potential vorticity

Eric R. Nash;Paul A. Newman;Joan E. Rosenfield;Mark R. Schoeberl.
Journal of Geophysical Research (1996)

608 Citations

Nimbus 7 satellite measurements of the springtime Antarctic ozone decrease

R. S. Stolarski;A. J. Krueger;M. R. Schoeberl;R. D. McPeters.
Nature (1986)

564 Citations

The structure of the polar vortex

Mark R. Schoeberl;Leslie R. Lait;Paul A. Newman;Joan E. Rosenfield.
Journal of Geophysical Research (1992)

416 Citations

The dynamics of the stratospheric polar vortex and its relation to springtime ozone depletions

Mark R. Schoeberl;Dennis L. Hartmann.
Science (1991)

350 Citations

Overview of the EOS aura mission

M.R. Schoeberl;A.R. Douglass;E. Hilsenrath;P.K. Bhartia.
IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (2006)

342 Citations

Airborne lidar observations in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere: Polar stratospheric clouds

E. V. Browell;C. F. Butler;S. Ismail;P. A. Robinette.
Geophysical Research Letters (1990)

325 Citations

Transport of smoke from Canadian forest fires to the surface near Washington, D.C.: Injection height, entrainment, and optical properties

P. R. Colarco;M. R. Schoeberl;B. G. Doddridge;L. T. Marufu.
Journal of Geophysical Research (2004)

300 Citations

Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height, and pressure for 0 - 120 km

Sushil Chandra;Eric L. Fleming;Mark R. Schoeberl;John J. Barnett.
Advances in Space Research (1990)

282 Citations

Where did tropospheric ozone over southern Africa and the tropical Atlantic come from in October 1992? Insights from TOMS, GTE TRACE A, and SAFARI 1992

A. M. Thompson;K. E. Pickering;D. P. McNamara;M. R. Schoeberl.
Journal of Geophysical Research (1996)

278 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Top Scientists Citing Mark R. Schoeberl

Gloria L. Manney

Gloria L. Manney

Northwest Research Associates

Publications: 121

Kaley A. Walker

Kaley A. Walker

University of Toronto

Publications: 113

Martyn P. Chipperfield

Martyn P. Chipperfield

University of Leeds

Publications: 111

Rolf Müller

Rolf Müller

Forschungszentrum Jülich

Publications: 108

Anne M. Thompson

Anne M. Thompson

Goddard Space Flight Center

Publications: 104

Anne R. Douglass

Anne R. Douglass

Goddard Space Flight Center

Publications: 104

Paul Newman

Paul Newman

Goddard Space Flight Center

Publications: 102

Michelle L. Santee

Michelle L. Santee

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 96

Peter F. Bernath

Peter F. Bernath

Old Dominion University

Publications: 95

Lucien Froidevaux

Lucien Froidevaux

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 91

Nathaniel J. Livesey

Nathaniel J. Livesey

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 86

James M. Russell

James M. Russell

Brown University

Publications: 84

Ross J. Salawitch

Ross J. Salawitch

University of Maryland, College Park

Publications: 82

William G. Read

William G. Read

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 74

Richard S. Stolarski

Richard S. Stolarski

Johns Hopkins University

Publications: 73

Something went wrong. Please try again later.