H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 100 Citations 57,711 199 World Ranking 259 National Ranking 156

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2004 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2003 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

1987 - Fellow of Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Neuroscience
  • Gene
  • Neuron

Mark F. Bear mainly focuses on Neuroscience, Synaptic plasticity, Long-term potentiation, Long-term depression and Visual cortex. His Neuroscience research integrates issues from NMDA receptor and Metaplasticity. His Synaptic plasticity study incorporates themes from Hippocampus, Metabotropic glutamate receptor and Anatomy.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Neurotransmission and Long-Term Synaptic Depression. His Long-term depression research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Postsynaptic density and Silent synapse. His Visual cortex study combines topics in areas such as Cerebral cortex and Neuron.

His most cited work include:

  • LTP and LTD: an embarrassment of riches. (3088 citations)
  • Learning Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus (1446 citations)
  • Homosynaptic long-term depression in area CA1 of hippocampus and effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade. (1385 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Mark F. Bear focuses on Neuroscience, Visual cortex, Synaptic plasticity, Long-term potentiation and Fragile X syndrome. His Neuroscience research incorporates themes from Metaplasticity, Long-term depression and Metabotropic glutamate receptor. Mark F. Bear combines subjects such as NMDA receptor, Kitten, Anatomy and Neurotransmission with his study of Visual cortex.

As a part of the same scientific family, Mark F. Bear mostly works in the field of Synaptic plasticity, focusing on Hippocampus and, on occasion, Hippocampal formation. His Long-term potentiation study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Stimulus and Stimulation. His study in Fragile X syndrome is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Autism and FMR1.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (81.94%)
  • Visual cortex (43.40%)
  • Synaptic plasticity (31.60%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Neuroscience (81.94%)
  • Fragile X syndrome (18.40%)
  • Visual cortex (43.40%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Neuroscience, Fragile X syndrome, Visual cortex, Neuroplasticity and Long-term potentiation. His studies in Neuroscience integrate themes in fields like Synaptic plasticity, Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and FMR1. His Fragile X syndrome research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Neurodevelopmental disorder, Autism, Gene expression and Intellectual disability.

His research in Visual cortex intersects with topics in Cerebral cortex, Retinal, Interneuron and Audiology. In his study, which falls under the umbrella issue of Neuroplasticity, Neocortex is strongly linked to Recognition memory. His Metaplasticity study in the realm of Long-term potentiation connects with subjects such as Arc.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Lovastatin corrects excess protein synthesis and prevents epileptogenesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome. (160 citations)
  • Fragile X mental retardation protein and synaptic plasticity. (143 citations)
  • A Cholinergic Mechanism for Reward Timing within Primary Visual Cortex (133 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Neuroscience
  • Neuron

Neuroscience, Fragile X syndrome, Neuroplasticity, Synaptic plasticity and Visual cortex are his primary areas of study. Mark F. Bear is interested in Monocular deprivation, which is a branch of Neuroscience. His Monocular deprivation research includes elements of Metaplasticity and Anatomy.

His work deals with themes such as Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, Cholinergic, Basal forebrain, Long-Term Synaptic Depression and Stimulation, which intersect with Neuroplasticity. Synaptic plasticity is frequently linked to Long-term depression in his study. His Visual cortex research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Stimulus, Cognitive psychology, Somatosensory system and Acetylcholine.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain

Mark F. Bear;Barry W. Connors;Michael A. Paradiso.
(1996)

4414 Citations

LTP and LTD: an embarrassment of riches.

Robert C. Malenka;Mark F. Bear.
Neuron (2004)

4184 Citations

Homosynaptic long-term depression in area CA1 of hippocampus and effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade.

Serena M. Dudek;Mark F. Bear.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1992)

2002 Citations

Learning Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

Jonathan R. Whitlock;Arnold J. Heynen;Marshall G. Shuler;Mark F. Bear.
Science (2006)

1958 Citations

The mGluR theory of fragile X mental retardation

Mark F Bear;Kimberly M Huber;Stephen T Warren.
Trends in Neurosciences (2004)

1636 Citations

Metaplasticity: the plasticity of synaptic plasticity

Wickliffe C. Abraham;Mark F. Bear.
Trends in Neurosciences (1996)

1608 Citations

Synaptic plasticity: LTP and LTD

Mark F. Bear;Robert C. Malenka.
Current Opinion in Neurobiology (1994)

1525 Citations

Altered synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X mental retardation

Kimberly M. Huber;Kimberly M. Huber;Sean M. Gallagher;Stephen T. Warren;Mark F. Bear.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2002)

1320 Citations

BDNF Regulates the Maturation of Inhibition and the Critical Period of Plasticity in Mouse Visual Cortex

Z. Josh Huang;Alfredo Kirkwood;Tommaso Pizzorusso;Vittorio Porciatti.
Cell (1999)

1242 Citations

Regulation of distinct AMPA receptor phosphorylation sites during bidirectional synaptic plasticity.

Hey Kyoung Lee;Michaela Barbarosie;Kimihiko Kameyama;Mark F. Bear.
Nature (2000)

1237 Citations

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