H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry H-index 128 Citations 67,549 203 World Ranking 190 National Ranking 135

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Neuron

Morgan Sheng mainly investigates Cell biology, Neuroscience, Postsynaptic density, Postsynaptic potential and NMDA receptor. His study in Cell biology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Dendritic spine, AMPA receptor, Disks Large Homolog 4 Protein and SHANK2. As a member of one scientific family, he mostly works in the field of Dendritic spine, focusing on Dendritic spine morphogenesis and, on occasion, Spine.

He has researched Neuroscience in several fields, including Synaptic plasticity, Transcription factor, Gene expression and Neurotransmission. As a part of the same scientific family, Morgan Sheng mostly works in the field of Postsynaptic potential, focusing on Excitatory postsynaptic potential and, on occasion, Glutamate receptor, Active zone and Nonsynaptic plasticity. His NMDA receptor study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Endocrinology, Protein subunit, Mutant, Habituation and Long-term potentiation.

His most cited work include:

  • The regulation and function of c-fos and other immediate early genes in the nervous system. (2036 citations)
  • CREB: a Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factor phosphorylated by calmodulin-dependent kinases (1308 citations)
  • PDZ domain proteins of synapses (1266 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Morgan Sheng mainly focuses on Cell biology, Neuroscience, AMPA receptor, Postsynaptic density and Postsynaptic potential. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Dendritic spine, NMDA receptor, Receptor and Long-term depression. His Receptor research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Protein subunit and Signal transduction.

His Neuroscience study combines topics in areas such as Synaptic plasticity and Neurotransmission. He combines subjects such as Endocytic cycle, Endocytosis and Internalization with his study of AMPA receptor. His Postsynaptic density research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Scaffold protein and Metabotropic glutamate receptor.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Cell biology (66.78%)
  • Neuroscience (40.83%)
  • AMPA receptor (32.53%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Cell biology (66.78%)
  • Neuroscience (40.83%)
  • Dendritic spine (20.42%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Cell biology, Neuroscience, Dendritic spine, Microglia and Synaptic plasticity. His research in Cell biology intersects with topics in Internalization, Ubiquitin and Neurotransmission. His research in Neurotransmission tackles topics such as Protein subunit which are related to areas like Receptor.

Morgan Sheng has included themes like AMPA receptor, Long-term potentiation and Disease in his Neuroscience study. His work deals with themes such as Synapse, Long-term depression and Postsynaptic potential, Postsynaptic density, which intersect with Dendritic spine. His Synaptic plasticity study incorporates themes from Glutamate receptor and NMDA receptor.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 17 new Parkinson's disease risk loci. (533 citations)
  • The mitochondrial deubiquitinase USP30 opposes parkin-mediated mitophagy (428 citations)
  • Microglia in Alzheimer's disease. (371 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Neuron

His primary areas of study are Cell biology, Synapse, Microglia, Dendritic spine and Disease. His work focuses on many connections between Cell biology and other disciplines, such as Deubiquitinating enzyme, that overlap with his field of interest in Bioinformatics. His Dendritic spine research integrates issues from Caspase 3, Inhibitor of apoptosis, Dendrite, Proteasome and Postsynaptic density.

To a larger extent, Morgan Sheng studies Postsynaptic potential with the aim of understanding Postsynaptic density. His Disease study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Neuroscience and Case-control study. His Neuroscience research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Synaptic plasticity, Secretion and Human genetics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

The regulation and function of c-fos and other immediate early genes in the nervous system.

Morgan Sheng;Michael E. Greenberg.
Neuron (1990)

2715 Citations

PDZ domain proteins of synapses

Eunjoon Kim;Morgan Sheng.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2004)

1723 Citations

CREB: a Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factor phosphorylated by calmodulin-dependent kinases

Morgan Sheng;Margaret A. Thompson;Michael E. Greenberg.
Science (1991)

1707 Citations

Changing subunit composition of heteromeric NMDA receptors during development of rat cortex

Morgan Sheng;Jennifer Cummings;Leslie Ann Roldan;Yuh Nung Jan.
Nature (1994)

1490 Citations

PDZ Domains and the Organization of Supramolecular Complexes

Morgan Sheng;Carlo Sala.
Annual Review of Neuroscience (2001)

1471 Citations

The Importance of Dendritic Mitochondria in the Morphogenesis and Plasticity of Spines and Synapses

Zheng Li;Ken Ichi Okamoto;Yasunori Hayashi;Morgan Sheng.
Cell (2004)

1361 Citations

Crystal structures of a complexed and peptide-free membrane protein-binding domain: molecular basis of peptide recognition by PDZ.

Declan A. Doyle;Alice Lee;John Lewis;Eunjoon Kim.
Cell (1996)

1333 Citations

Role of NMDA Receptor Subtypes in Governing the Direction of Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity

Lidong Liu;Tak Pan Wong;Mario F. Pozza;Kurt Lingenhoehl.
Science (2004)

1271 Citations

Membrane depolarization and calcium induce c-fos transcription via phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB.

Morgan Sheng;Grant McFadden;Michael E. Greenberg.
Neuron (1990)

1240 Citations

Clustering of Shaker-type K + channels by interaction with a family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases

Eunjoon Kim;Martin Niethammer;Adam Rothschild;Yuh Nung Jan.
Nature (1995)

1218 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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