D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Animal Science and Veterinary D-index 39 Citations 5,592 172 World Ranking 244 National Ranking 93

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Zoology
  • Genus

Tick, Ixodidae, Ecology, Zoology and Ixodes scapularis are his primary areas of study. His Tick research integrates issues from Genetic Speciation, Allopatric speciation and Vicariance. His Ixodidae study frequently links to adjacent areas such as Nymph.

His study ties his expertise on Tick vector together with the subject of Ecology. His research in Zoology intersects with topics in Phylogeography and Genetic structure. In his research on the topic of Ixodes scapularis, Ixodes affinis is strongly related with Lyme disease microbiology.

His most cited work include:

  • Ixodes (Ixodes) scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae): redescription of all active stages, distribution, hosts, geographical variation, and medical and veterinary importance. (185 citations)
  • Illustrated key to nymphs of the tick genus Amblyomma (Acari: Ixodidae) found in the United States. (171 citations)
  • A state-by-state survey of ticks recorded from humans in the United States. (147 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Zoology, Ecology, Tick, Ixodidae and Acari. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Host and Mite. Tick is a subfield of Veterinary medicine that Lance A. Durden tackles.

He combines subjects such as Ixodes and Nymph with his study of Ixodidae. His Ixodes scapularis study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Lyme disease and Amblyomma americanum. The concepts of his Dermacentor variabilis study are interwoven with issues in Dermacentor andersoni and Dermacentor.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Zoology (54.38%)
  • Ecology (38.25%)
  • Tick (36.41%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Zoology (54.38%)
  • Tick (36.41%)
  • Louse (13.36%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Zoology, Tick, Louse, Sucking louse and Acari. His Zoology research incorporates themes from Host and Mite. He is involved in the study of Tick that focuses on Ixodes scapularis in particular.

His work deals with themes such as Lyme disease, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Dermacentor variabilis, Dermacentor andersoni and Ixodes uriae, which intersect with Ixodes scapularis. His work is dedicated to discovering how Louse, Lemur are connected with Ectoparasitism and other disciplines. His studies in Ixodidae integrate themes in fields like Mating, Nidicolous, Nest and Arthropod mouthparts.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The Amblyomma maculatum Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae) group of ticks: phenotypic plasticity or incipient speciation? (22 citations)
  • Far-Reaching Dispersal of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato-Infected Blacklegged Ticks by Migratory Songbirds in Canada. (10 citations)
  • Extensive Distribution of the Lyme Disease Bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, in Multiple Tick Species Parasitizing Avian and Mammalian Hosts across Canada (9 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Zoology
  • Genus

Zoology, Tick, Lyme disease, Ixodes scapularis and Nymph are his primary areas of study. His work carried out in the field of Zoology brings together such families of science as Microcebus murinus and Mouse lemur. His Mouse lemur study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Acariformes, Trombiculidae, Rodent and Animal ecology.

His work in the fields of Tick, such as Ixodes cookei and Ixodidae, overlaps with other areas such as Enzootic. His work in Sucking louse tackles topics such as Psocodea which are related to areas like Nearctic ecozone, Identification key and Host. His studies deal with areas such as Babesiosis, Bird migration, Biological dispersal and Babesia as well as Sensu.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Ixodes (Ixodes) scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae): redescription of all active stages, distribution, hosts, geographical variation, and medical and veterinary importance.

J. E. Keirans;H. J. Hutcheson;H. J. Hutcheson;L. A. Durden;J. S. H. Klompen.
Journal of Medical Entomology (1996)

279 Citations

Illustrated key to nymphs of the tick genus Amblyomma (Acari: Ixodidae) found in the United States.

James E. Keirans;Lance A. Durden.
Journal of Medical Entomology (1998)

255 Citations

A state-by-state survey of ticks recorded from humans in the United States.

Heather A. Merten;Lance A. Durden.
Journal of Vector Ecology (2000)

215 Citations

Birds disperse ixodid (Acari: Ixodidae) and Borrelia burgdorferi-infected ticks in Canada

John D. Scott;Keerthi Fernando;Satyendra N. Banerjee;Lance A. Durden.
Journal of Medical Entomology (2001)

186 Citations

Ticks parasitizing humans in Georgia and South Carolina

Michael W. Felz;Lance A. Durden;James H. Oliver.
Journal of Parasitology (1996)

167 Citations

Host Associations and Seasonal Activity of Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in Missouri

Thomas M. Kollars;Thomas M. Kollars;James H. Oliver;Lance A. Durden;Peggy G. Kollars.
Journal of Parasitology (2000)

152 Citations

An enzootic transmission cycle of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the southeastern United States

J. H. Oliver;Tao Lin;L. Gao;K. L. Clark.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2003)

151 Citations

Migratory songbirds disperse ticks across Canada, and first isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, from the avian tick, Ixodes auritulus.

Muhammad G. Morshed;John D. Scott;Keerthi Fernando;Lorenza Beati.
Journal of Parasitology (2005)

147 Citations

Molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Ixodes ricinus complex is a paraphyletic group.

Guang Xu;Quentin Q. Fang;James E. Keirans;Lance A. Durden.
Journal of Parasitology (2003)

146 Citations

Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) and Rickettsia parkeri, United States.

John W. Sumner;Lance A. Durden;Jerome Goddard;Ellen Y. Stromdahl.
Emerging Infectious Diseases (2007)

139 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Lance A. Durden

Marcelo B. Labruna

Marcelo B. Labruna

Universidade de São Paulo

Publications: 73

Nicholas H. Ogden

Nicholas H. Ogden

Public Health Agency of Canada

Publications: 45

Christopher D. Paddock

Christopher D. Paddock

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Publications: 45

Michael J. Yabsley

Michael J. Yabsley

University of Georgia

Publications: 38

Santiago Nava

Santiago Nava

National Institute of Agricultural Technology

Publications: 38

Agustín Estrada-Peña

Agustín Estrada-Peña

University of Zaragoza

Publications: 35

Alberto A. Guglielmone

Alberto A. Guglielmone

International Trademark Association

Publications: 34

Didier Raoult

Didier Raoult

Aix-Marseille University

Publications: 34

José M. Venzal

José M. Venzal

University of the Republic

Publications: 31

Thiago F. Martins

Thiago F. Martins

Universidade de São Paulo

Publications: 30

Jerome Goddard

Jerome Goddard

Mississippi State University

Publications: 30

Rebecca J. Eisen

Rebecca J. Eisen

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Publications: 29

Janet E Foley

Janet E Foley

University of California, Davis

Publications: 29

Ivan Gerard Horak

Ivan Gerard Horak

University of Pretoria

Publications: 29

Susan E. Little

Susan E. Little

Oklahoma State University

Publications: 26

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us
Something went wrong. Please try again later.