D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Animal Science and Veterinary D-index 21 Citations 1,475 44 World Ranking 1591 National Ranking 92

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Zoology

Michael J. L. Magrath mainly focuses on Ecology, Zoology, Sexual selection, Mating and Hatching. His research integrates issues of Sexual dimorphism, Paternal care, Sex ratio and Reproductive success in his study of Ecology. His Paternal care research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Morning, Hirundo, Mate choice, Spite and Araneida.

His study looks at the intersection of Reproductive success and topics like Predation with Avian clutch size and Brood. His Zoology study incorporates themes from Acrocephalus, Seychelles warbler and Hatchling. His study in Sexual selection is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Cyanistes, Ecology and Maternal effect.

His most cited work include:

  • Is male care compromised by additional mating opportunity (178 citations)
  • Pre-ovulation control of hatchling sex ratio in the Seychelles warbler. (123 citations)
  • Pre-ovulation control of hatchling sex ratio in the Seychelles warbler. (123 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Michael J. L. Magrath mainly investigates Ecology, Zoology, Brood, Paternal care and Cyanistes. Michael J. L. Magrath has researched Ecology in several fields, including Sexual dimorphism and Reproductive success. His Sexual dimorphism research includes themes of Sex characteristics and Acrocephalus.

The various areas that Michael J. L. Magrath examines in his Zoology study include Maternal effect and Sex ratio. His Paternal care research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Sturnus and Parental investment. His studies deal with areas such as Genetics and Seychelles warbler as well as Cyanistes.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (98.41%)
  • Zoology (80.95%)
  • Brood (33.33%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2020)?

  • Zoology (80.95%)
  • Feather (6.35%)
  • Beak (6.35%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Zoology, Feather, Beak, Psittaciformes and Ecology. His research in Zoology intersects with topics in Philoria frosti and Endemism. As part of the same scientific family, he usually focuses on Feather, concentrating on Virus and intersecting with Disease and Pathogen.

As a member of one scientific family, Michael J. L. Magrath mostly works in the field of Psittaciformes, focusing on Threatened species and, on occasion, Cacatua galerita, Host and Trichoglossus. His work on Sexual selection, Mate choice and Mating preferences as part of general Ecology research is often related to Breeding program and Perameles gunnii, thus linking different fields of science. Michael J. L. Magrath integrates many fields, such as Psittacine beak and feather disease, Nest box, Nest and Wildlife, in his works.

Between 2016 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • Museum Genomics Confirms that the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect Survived Extinction (20 citations)
  • Lifetime Fitness Costs of Inbreeding and Being Inbred in a Critically Endangered Bird. (17 citations)
  • Opportunity for female mate choice improves reproductive outcomes in the conservation breeding program of the eastern barred bandicoot (Perameles gunnii) (9 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Insect

Reproductive success, Zoology, Conservation biology, Conservation genetics and Inbreeding are his primary areas of study. His research integrates issues of Ecology, Captivity, Sexual selection and Mate choice in his study of Reproductive success. His studies link Endemism with Zoology.

He regularly ties together related areas like Endangered species in his Endemism studies. His Conservation biology research integrates issues from Critically endangered, Genetic Fitness and Inbreeding depression.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Is male care compromised by additional mating opportunity

Michael J.L. Magrath;Jan Komdeur.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2003)

272 Citations

Pre-ovulation control of hatchling sex ratio in the Seychelles warbler.

Jan Komdeur;Michael J L Magrath;Michael J L Magrath;Sven Krackow.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2002)

139 Citations

Paternal care declines with increased opportunity for extra-pair matings in fairy martins

Michael J. L. Magrath;Mark A. Elgar.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (1997)

112 Citations

The evolution of egg rejection by cuckoo hosts in Australia and Europe

N E Langmore;R M Kilner;S H M Butchart;G Maurer.
Behavioral Ecology (2005)

110 Citations

Maternal Effects Contribute to the Superior Performance of Extra-Pair Offspring

Michael J. L. Magrath;Michael J. L. Magrath;Oscar Vedder;Marco van der Velde;Jan Komdeur.
Current Biology (2009)

103 Citations

Timing of prenuptial molt as a sexually selected indicator of male quality in superb fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus)

Raoul A. Mulder;Michael J. L. Magrath.
Behavioral Ecology (1994)

95 Citations

Helping enhances multiple components of reproductive success in the cooperatively breeding apostlebird

Iain A. Woxvold;Michael J. L. Magrath.
Journal of Animal Ecology (2005)

75 Citations

Egg size and laying order in relation to offspring sex in the extreme sexually size dimorphic brown songlark, Cinclorhamphus cruralis

Michael J. L. Magrath;Michael J. L. Magrath;Lyanne Brouwer;Jan Komdeur.
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (2003)

60 Citations

Animal personality and pace-of-life syndromes: do fast-exploring fairy-wrens die young?

Michelle L. Hall;Timon van Asten;Andrew C. Katsis;Niels J. Dingemanse;Niels J. Dingemanse.
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution (2015)

56 Citations

Contributions to care vary with age, sex, breeding status and group size in the cooperatively breeding apostlebird

Iain A. Woxvold;Raoul A. Mulder;Michael J.L. Magrath.
Animal Behaviour (2006)

38 Citations

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Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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