D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Social Sciences and Humanities D-index 31 Citations 6,048 115 World Ranking 4624 National Ranking 38

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Law
  • Social science
  • Statistics

Bertil Tungodden focuses on Dictator game, Positive economics, Social preferences, Social psychology and Microeconomics. His Dictator game research includes themes of Association, Bounded rationality, Perception and Similarity. His research integrates issues of Egalitarianism, Affect, Normative reasoning and Luck in his study of Positive economics.

His Egalitarianism research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Property, Distributive justice, Libertarianism and Value. His Distributive justice study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Welfare economics and Equity. His Microeconomics research integrates issues from Social Welfare, Global environmental analysis and Public finance.

His most cited work include:

  • The pluralism of fairness ideals: An experimental approach (394 citations)
  • Fairness and the Development of Inequality Acceptance (206 citations)
  • Just Luck: An Experimental Study of Risk-Taking and Fairness (163 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Social psychology, Positive economics, Social preferences, Dictator game and Microeconomics. Bertil Tungodden works mostly in the field of Social psychology, limiting it down to topics relating to Politics and, in certain cases, Affect. His Positive economics research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Welfare economics, Luck, Moral responsibility, Egalitarianism and Dilemma.

His studies deal with areas such as Pareto principle and Libertarianism as well as Egalitarianism. His work is dedicated to discovering how Dictator game, Distributive justice are connected with Production and other disciplines. His work deals with themes such as Utilitarianism and Social Welfare, which intersect with Microeconomics.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Social psychology (21.20%)
  • Positive economics (20.74%)
  • Social preferences (16.13%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Redistribution (10.60%)
  • Politics (8.29%)
  • Social preferences (16.13%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Redistribution, Politics, Social preferences, Demographic economics and Social psychology are his primary areas of study. His Social preferences research includes elements of False positive paradox, False positives and false negatives and Trade-off. The study incorporates disciplines such as Gender bias and Lagging in addition to Demographic economics.

His Social psychology research incorporates elements of Individualism and Dictator. His Moral obligation research focuses on subjects like Gender and development, which are linked to Distributive justice. He integrates many fields, such as Positive economics and Research review, in his works.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • You’ve Got Mail: A Randomized Field Experiment on Tax Evasion (39 citations)
  • The development of children's preferences for equality and equity across 13 individualistic and collectivist cultures. (28 citations)
  • Cutthroat capitalism versus cuddly socialism: Are Americans more meritocratic and efficiency-seeking than Scandinavians? (24 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Law
  • Social science
  • Capitalism

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Social preferences, Social psychology, Political economy, Redistribution and Politics. His Social preferences study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as False positives and false negatives, False positive paradox, Trade-off and Developmental psychology, Early childhood education. His work blends Social psychology and Zhàng studies together.

Bertil Tungodden has included themes like Salient, Meritocracy, Capitalism and Luck in his Political economy study. His study in Collectivism is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Social comparison theory, Social decision making, Prosocial behavior and Dictator game. His Individualism study combines topics in areas such as Empathy, Distributive justice, Equity and Morality.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The pluralism of fairness ideals: An experimental approach

Alexander W. Cappelen;Astri Drange Hole;Erik Ø. Sørensen;Bertil Tungodden.
The American Economic Review (2007)

778 Citations

Fairness and the Development of Inequality Acceptance

Ingvild Almås;Alexander W. Cappelen;Erik Ø. Sørensen;Bertil Tungodden.
Science (2010)

436 Citations

Just Luck: An Experimental Study of Risk-Taking and Fairness

Alexander Wright Cappelen;James Konow;Erik Øiolf Sørensen;Bertil Tungodden.
The American Economic Review (2013)

413 Citations

Human and Financial Capital for Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field and Lab Experiment

Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge;Kjetil Bjorvatn;Bertil Tungodden.
Management Science (2015)

340 Citations

Responsibility for what? Fairness and individual responsibility

Alexander Wright Cappelen;Erik Øiolf Sørensen;Erik Øiolf Sørensen;Bertil Tungodden;Bertil Tungodden.
European Economic Review (2010)

265 Citations

Cutthroat capitalism versus cuddly socialism: Are Americans more meritocratic and efficiency-seeking than Scandinavians?

Ingvild Almas;Alexander W. Cappelen;Bertil Tungodden.
Journal of Political Economy (2020)

190 Citations

Measuring unfair (in)equality

Ingvild Almås;Ingvild Almås;Alexander W. Cappelen;Jo Thori Lind;Erik Ø. Sørensen.
Journal of Public Economics (2011)

182 Citations

You’ve Got Mail: A Randomized Field Experiment on Tax Evasion

Kristina Bott;Alexander Wright Cappelen;Erik Øiolf Sørensen;Bertil Tungodden.
Management Science (2020)

167 Citations

Willingness to Compete: Family Matters

Ingvild Almås;Alexander W. Cappelen;Kjell Gunnar Salvanes;Erik Ø. Sørensen.
Management Science (2016)

161 Citations

Fiscal Corruption: A Vice or a Virtue?

Odd-Helge Fjeldstad;Bertil Tungodden.
World Development (2003)

144 Citations

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