H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Animal Science and Veterinary D-index 31 Citations 4,927 90 World Ranking 422 National Ranking 155

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2003 - Animal Management Award, American Society of Animal Science

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Agriculture
  • Ecology
  • Animal science

Terry L. Mader mostly deals with Animal science, Beef cattle, Feedlot cattle, Feedlot and Crossbreed. His research integrates issues of Wet-bulb globe temperature, Humidity and Ecology in his study of Animal science. He focuses mostly in the field of Beef cattle, narrowing it down to matters related to Relative humidity and, in some cases, Atmospheric sciences.

His Feedlot cattle research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Livestock and Animal feed. His Feedlot research integrates issues from Androgen, Trenbolone, Internal medicine, Manure and Steroid. His Crossbreed study which covers Veterinary medicine that intersects with Morning and Meal.

His most cited work include:

  • Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. (371 citations)
  • A new heat load index for feedlot cattle. (237 citations)
  • Heat tolerance of Boran and Tuli crossbred steers. (156 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Terry L. Mader mainly investigates Animal science, Feedlot, Beef cattle, Feedlot cattle and Agronomy. Terry L. Mader specializes in Animal science, namely Crossbreed. Terry L. Mader has included themes like Dry matter, Environmental engineering, Trenbolone acetate, Feeding Regimen and Relative humidity in his Feedlot study.

Terry L. Mader combines subjects such as Acclimatization and Atmospheric sciences with his study of Relative humidity. His research investigates the connection between Beef cattle and topics such as Livestock that intersect with issues in Climate change. His Feedlot cattle study often links to related topics such as Veterinary medicine.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Animal science (63.08%)
  • Feedlot (33.85%)
  • Beef cattle (24.62%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2010-2020)?

  • Animal science (63.08%)
  • Feedlot (33.85%)
  • Manure (6.15%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Animal science, Feedlot, Manure, Beef cattle and Feedlot cattle. He interconnects Hormone and Relative humidity in the investigation of issues within Animal science. His study in the field of Wet-bulb globe temperature also crosses realms of Linear regression and Climatic data.

His study connects Breed and Feedlot. His work on Angus cattle is typically connected to Ice calving as part of general Beef cattle study, connecting several disciplines of science. While the research belongs to areas of Feedlot cattle, Terry L. Mader spends his time largely on the problem of Agriculture, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Soil carbon and Precipitation.

Between 2010 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • Effect of growth promotants on the occurrence of endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones on feedlot soils and in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations. (99 citations)
  • Effects of chronic heat stress on plasma concentration of secreted heat shock protein 70 in growing feedlot cattle (63 citations)
  • Body temperature and respiratory dynamics in un-shaded beef cattle (41 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Agriculture
  • Ecology
  • Animal science

His main research concerns Animal science, Relative humidity, Wet-bulb globe temperature, Beef cattle and Climate change. His primary area of study in Animal science is in the field of Feedlot. The study incorporates disciplines such as Water intake, Crossbred cattle and Environmental factor in addition to Feedlot.

His Relative humidity study combines topics in areas such as Veterinary medicine and Plasma concentration. His research in Wet-bulb globe temperature intersects with topics in Feedlot cattle, Acclimatization and Chronic stress. His Beef cattle study incorporates themes from Hormone, Endocrinology and Biotechnology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle.

Terry L. Mader;M. S. Davis;Tami Brown-Brandl.
Journal of Animal Science (2006)

561 Citations

A new heat load index for feedlot cattle.

J. B. Gaughan;Terry L. Mader;S. M. Holt;A. Lisle.
Journal of Animal Science (2008)

406 Citations

Heat tolerance of Boran and Tuli crossbred steers.

J. B. Gaughan;T. L. Mader;S. M. Holt;M. J. Josey.
Journal of Animal Science (1999)

241 Citations

A comprehensive index for assessing environmental stress in animals.

T. L. Mader;L. J. Johnson;J. B. Gaughan.
Journal of Animal Science (2010)

237 Citations

Environmental stress in confined beef cattle

T. L. Mader.
Journal of Animal Science (2003)

224 Citations

Environmental effects on pregnancy rate in beef cattle

J. L. Amundson;Terry L. Mader;Richard J. Rasby;Q. S. Hu.
Journal of Animal Science (2006)

181 Citations

Effect of management strategies on reducing heat stress of feedlot cattle: feed and water intake.

T. L. Mader;M. S. Davis.
Journal of Animal Science (2004)

178 Citations

Feeding strategies for managing heat load in feedlot cattle.

T. L. Mader;S. M. Holt;G. L. Hahn;M. S. Davis.
Journal of Animal Science (2002)

166 Citations

Shade and wind barrier effects on summertime feedlot cattle performance

T. L. Mader;J. M. Dahlquist;G. L. Hahn;J. B. Gaughan.
Journal of Animal Science (1999)

157 Citations

Strategies to reduce feedlot cattle heat stress: effects on tympanic temperature.

M. S. Davis;T. L. Mader;S. M. Holt;A. M. Parkhurst.
Journal of Animal Science (2003)

157 Citations

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