H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Plant Science and Agronomy H-index 100 Citations 39,837 279 World Ranking 19 National Ranking 3

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2003 - Fellow of the Royal Society, United Kingdom

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Botany
  • Genus
  • Ecology

Mark W. Chase focuses on Botany, Evolutionary biology, Phylogenetic tree, Phylogenetics and Monophyly. His Botany study frequently links to other fields, such as Malpighiales. His Evolutionary biology research includes themes of Chloroplast DNA, Clade, Orchidoideae and Cladistics.

His Phylogenetic tree study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Taxon and Ecology. His Phylogenetics study incorporates themes from Paleontology, Cretaceous and Genome. The study incorporates disciplines such as Urticaceae, Rosales, Polyphyly and Molecular phylogenetics in addition to Monophyly.

His most cited work include:

  • An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG II (4749 citations)
  • A DNA barcode for land plants. (1609 citations)
  • Evolution of the angiosperms: calibrating the family tree. (1313 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Mark W. Chase mostly deals with Botany, Evolutionary biology, Phylogenetic tree, Phylogenetics and Monophyly. His study in Botany is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Clade and Molecular phylogenetics. His research integrates issues of Genome, Polyploid, Plastid, Orchidoideae and Systematics in his study of Evolutionary biology.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Ecology and Tribe. His Phylogenetics study combines topics in areas such as Taxonomy and DNA sequencing. The Monophyly study combines topics in areas such as Zoology, Internal transcribed spacer, Polyphyly, Paraphyly and Maximum parsimony.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Botany (52.43%)
  • Evolutionary biology (43.58%)
  • Phylogenetic tree (38.72%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Evolutionary biology (43.58%)
  • Phylogenetic tree (38.72%)
  • Botany (52.43%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Evolutionary biology, Phylogenetic tree, Botany, Phylogenetics and Orchidaceae. His Evolutionary biology research incorporates themes from Clade, Genome size, Plastid, Orchidoideae and Systematics. He has researched Phylogenetic tree in several fields, including Taxon and Genome.

Specifically, his work in Botany is concerned with the study of Genus. His Phylogenetics research includes elements of Taxonomy and DNA barcoding. The various areas that Mark W. Chase examines in his Orchidaceae study include Epidendroideae and Collabieae.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG II (4749 citations)
  • Origin of angiosperms and the puzzle of the Jurassic gap (146 citations)
  • Origin of angiosperms and the puzzle of the Jurassic gap (146 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Botany
  • Genus
  • Ecology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Phylogenetic tree, Evolutionary biology, Botany, Molecular phylogenetics and Plastid. His Phylogenetic tree study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Taxon, Genome, Genome size and DNA sequencing. His work deals with themes such as Chloroplast DNA and Polyploid, which intersect with Evolutionary biology.

His Botany research includes themes of Liliales, Morphometrics and Monophyly. His Molecular phylogenetics research focuses on Orchidoideae and how it connects with Orchidaceae, Hemipilia, Habenaria and Taxonomy. His work carried out in the field of Plastid brings together such families of science as Phylogenetics, Clade and Dioscoreaceae.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG IV

K. Bremer;M. W. Chase;J. L. Reveal;D. E. Soltis.
Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society (2016)

3341 Citations

A DNA barcode for land plants.

Peter M. Hollingsworth;Laura L. Forrest;John L. Spouge.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009)

2085 Citations

Evolution of the angiosperms: calibrating the family tree.

Niklas Wikström;Vincent Savolainen;Mark W. Chase.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2001)

1676 Citations

Angiosperm phylogeny inferred from 18S rDNA, rbcL, and atpB sequences

Douglas E. Soltis;Pamela S. Soltis;Mark W. Chase;Mark E. Mort.
Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society (2000)

1533 Citations

An ordinal classification for the families of flowering plants

Kåre Bremer;Mark W. Chase;Peter F. Stevens;Arne A. Anderberg.
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden (1998)

1000 Citations

Angiosperm phylogeny inferred from multiple genes as a tool for comparative biology

Pamela S. Soltis;Douglas E. Soltis;Mark W. Chase.
Nature (1999)

927 Citations

The earliest angiosperms: evidence from mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genomes

Yin Long Qiu;Jungho Lee;Fabiana Bernasconi-Quadroni;Douglas E. Soltis.
Nature (1999)

916 Citations

Land plants and DNA barcodes: short-term and long-term goals.

Mark W Chase;Nicolas Salamin;Mike Wilkinson;James M Dunwell.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2005)

725 Citations

Phylogenetics of flowering plants based on combined analysis of plastid atpB and rbcL gene sequences.

Vincent Savolainen;Mark W. Chase;Sara B. Hoot;Cynthia M. Morton.
Systematic Biology (2000)

677 Citations

A proposal for a standardised protocol to barcode all land plants

Mark W. Chase;Robyn S. Cowan;Peter M. Hollingsworth;Cassio van den Berg.
Taxon (2007)

672 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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