H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 30 Citations 3,473 108 World Ranking 5267 National Ranking 351

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Ecosystem

His primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Uria lomvia, Foraging, Predation and Reproductive success. His study in Pelagic zone, Seabird, Eagle, Food chain and Apex predator is carried out as part of his Ecology studies. In his research, Capelin and Sculpin is intimately related to Generalist and specialist species, which falls under the overarching field of Seabird.

As a member of one scientific family, Kyle H. Elliott mostly works in the field of Uria lomvia, focusing on Arctic and, on occasion, Thick-billed murre. While the research belongs to areas of Predation, Kyle H. Elliott spends his time largely on the problem of Trophic level, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Bay, Anatidae, Caniformia and Ursus maritimus. The various areas that Kyle H. Elliott examines in his Reproductive success study include Zoology, Intraspecific competition, Fledge and Reproduction.

His most cited work include:

  • Individual specialization in diet by a generalist marine predator reflects specialization in foraging behaviour (214 citations)
  • High flight costs, but low dive costs, in auks support the biomechanical hypothesis for flightlessness in penguins (111 citations)
  • Seabird foraging behaviour indicates prey type (107 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary scientific interests are in Ecology, Predation, Foraging, Uria lomvia and Seabird. His studies in Ecology integrate themes in fields like Zoology, Fishery and Reproductive success. His Predation study which covers Pelagic zone that intersects with Benthic zone.

His work in Foraging tackles topics such as Capelin which are related to areas like Sculpin. His Uria lomvia research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Basal metabolic rate and Kittiwake. His Seabird research incorporates themes from Range and Wildlife.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (63.77%)
  • Predation (33.33%)
  • Foraging (28.26%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2019-2021)?

  • Zoology (26.09%)
  • Fishery (18.12%)
  • Ecology (63.77%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Kyle H. Elliott focuses on Zoology, Fishery, Ecology, Arctic and Seabird. His Zoology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Cerorhinca monocerata, Uria lomvia and Predation. His study in Predation is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Flight behaviour, Wing beat and Reproductive success.

His Fishery study incorporates themes from Trophic level and Haddock. His work in the fields of Ecology, such as Apex predator, Dominance and Subarctic climate, intersects with other areas such as Cover and Data discovery. His Seabird study combines topics in areas such as Foraging and Animal science.

Between 2019 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic (7 citations)
  • Coping with the commute: Behavioural responses to wind conditions in a foraging seabird (5 citations)
  • Seasonal variation of mercury contamination in Arctic seabirds: A pan-Arctic assessment. (4 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Predation
  • Habitat

Seabird, Predation, Arctic, Apex predator and Nest are his primary areas of study. His study in Foraging extends to Seabird with its themes. His Arctic research is under the purview of Ecology.

Ecology and Movement tracking are two areas of study in which he engages in interdisciplinary work. In his study, Overwintering, Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and Marine habitats is strongly linked to Fishery, which falls under the umbrella field of Apex predator. The concepts of his Nest study are interwoven with issues in Rhinoceros auklets, Seasonal breeder and Reproduction.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Individual specialization in diet by a generalist marine predator reflects specialization in foraging behaviour

Kerry J. Woo;Kyle Hamish Elliott;Melissa Davidson;Anthony J. Gaston;Anthony J. Gaston.
Journal of Animal Ecology (2008)

301 Citations

CENTRAL-PLACE FORAGING IN AN ARCTIC SEABIRD PROVIDES EVIDENCE FOR STORER-ASHMOLE'S HALO

Kyle H. Elliott;Kerry J. Woo;Anthony J. Gaston;Silvano Benvenuti.
The Auk (2009)

147 Citations

High flight costs, but low dive costs, in auks support the biomechanical hypothesis for flightlessness in penguins

Kyle H. Elliott;Robert E. Ricklefs;Anthony J. Gaston;Scott A. Hatch.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

143 Citations

Tracking Marine Pollution

John E. Elliott;Kyle H. Elliott.
Science (2013)

139 Citations

Seabird foraging behaviour indicates prey type

Kyle Hamish Elliott;Kerry Woo;Anthony J. Gaston;Silvano Benvenuti.
Marine Ecology Progress Series (2008)

131 Citations

Sex-specific behavior by a monomorphic seabird represents risk partitioning

Kyle Hamish Elliott;Kyle Hamish Elliott;Anthony J. Gaston;Douglas Crump.
Behavioral Ecology (2010)

113 Citations

PCBs and DDE, but not PBDEs, increase with trophic level and marine input in nestling bald eagles

Kyle Hamish Elliott;Lillian S. Cesh;Jessica A. Dooley;Robert J. Letcher.
Science of The Total Environment (2009)

101 Citations

Accelerometry predicts daily energy expenditure in a bird with high activity levels

Kyle H. Elliott;Maryline Le Vaillant;Maryline Le Vaillant;Akiko Kato;Akiko Kato;John R. Speakman;John R. Speakman.
Biology Letters (2013)

95 Citations

Age-related variation in energy expenditure in a long-lived bird within the envelope of an energy ceiling.

Kyle H. Elliott;Maryline Le Vaillant;Maryline Le Vaillant;Maryline Le Vaillant;Akiko Kato;Akiko Kato;Anthony J. Gaston.
Journal of Animal Ecology (2014)

84 Citations

Inbreeding effects on immune response in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia)

Jane M Reid;Peter Arcese;Lukas F Keller;Kyle H Elliott.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2007)

84 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Kyle H. Elliott

John E. Elliott

John E. Elliott

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Publications: 43

Mark L. Mallory

Mark L. Mallory

Acadia University

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David Grémillet

David Grémillet

University of Cape Town

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Richard A. Phillips

Richard A. Phillips

Natural Environment Research Council

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Akinori Takahashi

Akinori Takahashi

National Institute of Polar Research

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Anthony J. Gaston

Anthony J. Gaston

Carleton University

Publications: 25

Akiko Kato

Akiko Kato

University of La Rochelle

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John P. Y. Arnould

John P. Y. Arnould

Deakin University

Publications: 24

Keith A. Hobson

Keith A. Hobson

University of Western Ontario

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H. Grant Gilchrist

H. Grant Gilchrist

Carleton University

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Alexander S. Kitaysky

Alexander S. Kitaysky

University of Alaska Fairbanks

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Olivier Chastel

Olivier Chastel

University of La Rochelle

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John R. Speakman

John R. Speakman

Chinese Academy of Sciences

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Yan Ropert-Coudert

Yan Ropert-Coudert

University of La Rochelle

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Paco Bustamante

Paco Bustamante

Institut Universitaire de France

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Francis Daunt

Francis Daunt

Natural Environment Research Council

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