D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 35 Citations 3,671 90 World Ranking 3630 National Ranking 1303

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Genetics
  • Zoology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Zoology, Rissa tridactyla, Kittiwake and Seabird. Much of his study explores Ecology relationship to Animal science. His study in Zoology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Pelagic zone, Northern fulmar and Horned puffin.

His studies in Rissa tridactyla integrate themes in fields like Seasonal breeder, Cloaca, Charadriiformes, Foraging and Longevity. His study looks at the relationship between Seabird and fields such as Environmental protection, as well as how they intersect with chemical problems. His study looks at the relationship between Nest and topics such as Herring, which overlap with Incubation.

His most cited work include:

  • Food availability and population processes: severity of nutritional stress during reproduction predicts survival of long‐lived seabirds (116 citations)
  • High flight costs, but low dive costs, in auks support the biomechanical hypothesis for flightlessness in penguins (111 citations)
  • Northern Fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis ) (101 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Ecology, Zoology, Rissa tridactyla, Seabird and Foraging are his primary areas of study. Nest, Hatching, Productivity, Brood and Pelagic zone are the primary areas of interest in his Ecology study. His research integrates issues of Reproduction, Predation and Reproductive success in his study of Zoology.

Scott A. Hatch focuses mostly in the field of Rissa tridactyla, narrowing it down to topics relating to Kittiwake and, in certain cases, Animal ecology. Scott A. Hatch studied Seabird and Fishery that intersect with Forage fish. His Foraging research incorporates themes from Capelin and Animal science.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (49.22%)
  • Zoology (40.62%)
  • Rissa tridactyla (31.25%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Zoology (40.62%)
  • Seabird (20.31%)
  • Rissa tridactyla (31.25%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Scott A. Hatch mainly focuses on Zoology, Seabird, Rissa tridactyla, Ecology and Foraging. His work on Seasonal breeder as part of general Zoology study is frequently linked to Protein turnover, bridging the gap between disciplines. His Seabird research integrates issues from Sperm, Genetic similarity, Pattern recognition and Ageing.

He has researched Rissa tridactyla in several fields, including Senescence, Kittiwake and Reproductive success. In his research on the topic of Kittiwake, Major histocompatibility complex, Life history theory, Competition and Brood is strongly related with Hatching. His Foraging study combines topics in areas such as Animal science and Capelin, Predation.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Effects of developmental conditions on growth, stress and telomeres in black‐legged kittiwake chicks (22 citations)
  • Puffins reveal contrasting relationships between forage fish and ocean climate in the North Pacific (17 citations)
  • Reproductive effort and oxidative stress: effects of offspring sex and number on the physiological state of a long‐lived bird (12 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Genetics
  • Predation

His scientific interests lie mostly in Zoology, Forage fish, Seabird, Rissa tridactyla and Foraging. His research on Zoology often connects related areas such as Life history theory. His research on Forage fish also deals with topics like

  • Capelin which intersects with area such as Puffin, Nekton, Fratercula cirrhata, Fishery and Sand lance,
  • Cerorhinca monocerata that intertwine with fields like Horned puffin.

Seabird is a subfield of Predation that Scott A. Hatch studies. His Rissa tridactyla research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Senescence, Negligible senescence and Shivering. He combines subjects such as Rhinoceros auklets and Flight behaviour with his study of Foraging.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Northern Fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis )

Mark L. Mallory;Scott A. Hatch;David N. Nettleship.
The Birds of North America Online (1998)

177 Citations

Food availability and population processes: severity of nutritional stress during reproduction predicts survival of long‐lived seabirds

Alexander S. Kitaysky;John F. Piatt;Scott A. Hatch;Evgenia V. Kitaiskaia.
Functional Ecology (2010)

166 Citations

Puffins as samplers of juvenile pollock and other forage fish in the Gulf of Alaska

Scott Hatch;Gerald A. Sanger.
Marine Ecology Progress Series (1992)

147 Citations

High flight costs, but low dive costs, in auks support the biomechanical hypothesis for flightlessness in penguins

Kyle H. Elliott;Robert E. Ricklefs;Anthony J. Gaston;Scott A. Hatch.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

143 Citations

Components of productivity in black‐legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla: response to supplemental feeding

Verena A. Gill;Scott A. Hatch.
Journal of Avian Biology (2002)

131 Citations

Age-related differences in the cloacal microbiota of a wild bird species

Wouter F. D. van Dongen;Joël White;Joël White;Hanja B. Brandl;Yoshan Moodley.
BMC Ecology (2013)

119 Citations

Effects of human disturbance on breeding Least and Crested Auklets at St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

John F. Piatt;Bay D. Roberts;Wayne W. Lidster;John L. Wells.
The Auk (1990)

112 Citations

Sensitivity of breeding parameters to food supply in Black-legged Kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla

Verena A. Gill;Scott A. Hatch;Richard B. Lanctot.
Ibis (2002)

110 Citations

Are corticosterone levels a good indicator of food availability and reproductive performance in a kittiwake colony

Richard B. Lanctot;Scott A. Hatch;Verena A. Gill;Marcel Eens.
Hormones and Behavior (2003)

109 Citations

Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios

Justine Sears;Scott A. Hatch;Diane M. O’Brien.
Oecologia (2009)

106 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Scott A. Hatch

Mark L. Mallory

Mark L. Mallory

Acadia University

Publications: 71

Anthony J. Gaston

Anthony J. Gaston

Carleton University

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John F. Piatt

John F. Piatt

United States Geological Survey

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Alexander S. Kitaysky

Alexander S. Kitaysky

University of Alaska Fairbanks

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Daniel D. Roby

Daniel D. Roby

Oregon State University

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Olivier Chastel

Olivier Chastel

University of La Rochelle

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Kyle H. Elliott

Kyle H. Elliott

McGill University

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Frédéric Angelier

Frédéric Angelier

University of La Rochelle

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Richard A. Phillips

Richard A. Phillips

Natural Environment Research Council

Publications: 25

H. Grant Gilchrist

H. Grant Gilchrist

Carleton University

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Sarah Wanless

Sarah Wanless

Natural Environment Research Council

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Geir W. Gabrielsen

Geir W. Gabrielsen

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William A. Montevecchi

William A. Montevecchi

Memorial University of Newfoundland

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Akinori Takahashi

Akinori Takahashi

National Institute of Polar Research

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Robert W. Furness

Robert W. Furness

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Gregory J. Robertson

Gregory J. Robertson

Environment and Climate Change Canada

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