H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 43 Citations 7,066 264 World Ranking 2384 National Ranking 172

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • IUCN Red List
  • Ecosystem

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Arctic, Seabird, Debris and Trophic level. Ecology is a component of his Wildlife, Ecosystem, Range, Habitat and Biota studies. His Arctic research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Bay, Northern fulmar, Pollutant, Uria lomvia and Fishery.

The study incorporates disciplines such as Charadriiformes, Guano, Aquatic ecosystem and Nutrient in addition to Seabird. His Debris research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Aquatic environment and Microplastics, Plastic pollution. His studies in Trophic level integrate themes in fields like Indicator species and Sterna.

His most cited work include:

  • Can Local Ecological Knowledge Contribute to Wildlife Management? Case Studies of Migratory Birds (237 citations)
  • Arctic seabirds transport marine-derived contaminants. (198 citations)
  • Quantifying ingested debris in marine megafauna: a review and recommendations for standardization (133 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Ecology, Arctic, Seabird, Fishery and Zoology. His study in Habitat, Predation, Range, Trophic level and Nest are all subfields of Ecology. His Habitat research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Invertebrate and Wetland.

His work deals with themes such as Fulmar, Northern fulmar, Uria lomvia and Sterna, which intersect with Arctic. His Uria lomvia research includes elements of Bay and Rissa tridactyla. His Seabird study incorporates themes from Seasonal breeder, Sea ice, Climate change, Circumpolar star and Charadriiformes.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (62.92%)
  • Arctic (53.50%)
  • Seabird (34.35%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Arctic (53.50%)
  • Ecology (62.92%)
  • Seabird (34.35%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Arctic, Ecology, Seabird, Fishery and Zoology are his primary areas of study. His Arctic study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Tern, Climate change, Plastic pollution and Sterna. Many of his research projects under Seabird are closely connected to Dry weight with Dry weight, tying the diverse disciplines of science together.

His research in Rissa tridactyla intersects with topics in Kittiwake and Uria lomvia. His Fishery research includes themes of Range, Ecosystem and Wildlife. His Zoology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Larus and Waterfowl.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Current state of knowledge on biological effects from contaminants on arctic wildlife and fish (61 citations)
  • Assessing plastic debris in aquatic food webs: what we know and don’t know about uptake and trophic transfer (40 citations)
  • Recommended best practices for plastic and litter ingestion studies in marine birds: Collection, processing, and reporting (21 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • IUCN Red List
  • Habitat

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Arctic, Plastic pollution, Seabird, Ecology and Fishery. Mark L. Mallory merges Arctic with Dry weight in his study. Mark L. Mallory has researched Plastic pollution in several fields, including Ingestion, Fulmar and Biota.

His research in Northern fulmar and Rissa tridactyla are components of Seabird. His Northern fulmar research integrates issues from Environmental chemistry and Kittiwake. His research investigates the connection between Fishery and topics such as Marine debris that intersect with issues in Cepphus grylle.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Can Local Ecological Knowledge Contribute to Wildlife Management? Case Studies of Migratory Birds

Grant Gilchrist;Mark Mallory;Flemming Merkel.
Ecology and Society (2005)

426 Citations

Arctic seabirds transport marine-derived contaminants.

Jules M. Blais;Lynda E. Kimpe;Dominique McMahon;Bronwyn E. Keatley.
Science (2005)

270 Citations

Multicolony tracking reveals the winter distribution of a pelagic seabird on an ocean basin scale

Morten Frederiksen;Børge Moe;Francis Daunt;Richard A. Phillips.
Diversity and Distributions (2012)

192 Citations

Quantifying ingested debris in marine megafauna: a review and recommendations for standardization

Jennifer F. Provencher;Jennifer F. Provencher;Alexander L. Bond;Stephanie Avery-Gomm;Stephanie B. Borrelle.
Analytical Methods (2017)

178 Citations

Northern Fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis )

Mark L. Mallory;Scott A. Hatch;David N. Nettleship.
The Birds of North America Online (1998)

177 Citations

Levels and trends of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in Ivory Gull eggs from the Canadian Arctic, 1976 to 2004

Birgit M. Braune;Mark L. Mallory;H. Grant Gilchrist;Robert J. Letcher.
Science of The Total Environment (2007)

162 Citations

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)

J. M. Eadie;M. L. Mallory;H. G. Lumsden;A. Poole.
The Birds of North America Online (1995)

138 Citations

Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)

Ian C. T. Nisbet;D. V. Weseloh;Craig E. Hebert;Mark L. Mallory.
The Birds of North America Online (1994)

130 Citations

Local Ecological Knowledge of Ivory Gull Declines in Arctic Canada

Mark L. Mallory;H. Grant Gilchrist;Alain J. Fontaine;Jason A. Akearok.
Arctic (2003)

127 Citations

Seabirds as indicators of aquatic ecosystem conditions: a case for gathering multiple proxies of seabird health.

Mark L. Mallory;Stacey A. Robinson;Craig E. Hebert;Mark R. Forbes.
Marine Pollution Bulletin (2010)

123 Citations

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Contact us

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