H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Social Sciences and Humanities D-index 30 Citations 4,333 43 World Ranking 5588 National Ranking 2722

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Law
  • Mental health
  • Social psychology

Karen D. Lincoln mostly deals with Mental health, Social psychology, Clinical psychology, Ethnic group and Gerontology. Her Mental health research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Law and Depression. Karen D. Lincoln studied Depression and Affect that intersect with Social relation, National Comorbidity Survey, Interpersonal relationship and Social support.

Her Social psychology research incorporates elements of Nuclear family and Marital status. Her study on Psychological well-being is often connected to Human factors and ergonomics as part of broader study in Clinical psychology. Her study in Gerontology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Coping, Latin Americans, NEVER MARRIED and Educational attainment.

Her most cited work include:

  • Mental Health Services in Faith Communities: The Role of Clergy in Black Churches (288 citations)
  • Psychological Distress among Black and White Americans: Differential Effects of Social Support, Negative Interaction and Personal Control (210 citations)
  • Social Support, Negative Social Interactions, and Psychological Well‐Being (206 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Karen D. Lincoln focuses on Mental health, Gerontology, Social support, Clinical psychology and Depression. Mental health is a subfield of Psychiatry that Karen D. Lincoln tackles. The various areas that Karen D. Lincoln examines in her Gerontology study include Latin Americans, Demography, Ethnic group and Race.

Her Social support course of study focuses on Interpersonal relationship and Social relation. Her work on Distress as part of general Clinical psychology study is frequently linked to Protective factor, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of science. Her studies examine the connections between Depression and genetics, as well as such issues in Social stress, with regards to Marital satisfaction and Public policy.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Mental health (39.39%)
  • Gerontology (33.33%)
  • Social support (33.33%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Gerontology (33.33%)
  • Psychiatry (18.18%)
  • Depression (18.18%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Karen D. Lincoln mainly investigates Gerontology, Psychiatry, Depression, Mental health and Race. Karen D. Lincoln interconnects Culturally tailored and Literacy in the investigation of issues within Gerontology. When carried out as part of a general Psychiatry research project, her work on Sleep in non-human animals, Sleep quality, Anxiety and Mood is frequently linked to work in Allergy, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of study.

Her biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Social stress and Substance abuse. Her Mental health research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Social relation, Ethnic group and Population Heterogeneity. As part of her studies on Race, Karen D. Lincoln often connects relevant areas like Social support.

Between 2018 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Social stress, obesity, and depression among women: clarifying the role of physical activity. (9 citations)
  • Fundamental causes of barriers to participation in Alzheimer’s clinical research among African Americans (6 citations)
  • BrainWorks: A Comparative Effectiveness Trial to Examine Alzheimer's Disease Education for Community-Dwelling African Americans (6 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Law
  • Social psychology
  • Mental health

Her primary areas of investigation include Gerontology, Disease, Physical activity, Social stress and Association. Much of her study explores Gerontology relationship to Social support. Combining a variety of fields, including Disease, Clinical research, Clinical trial, Focus group, Culturally competent and Health literacy, are what the author presents in her essays.

Physical activity is integrated with Developmental psychology and Depression in her study.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Mental Health Services in Faith Communities: The Role of Clergy in Black Churches

Robert Joseph Taylor;Christopher G. Ellison;Linda M. Chatters;Jeffrey S. Levin.
Social Work (2000)

532 Citations

Social Support, Negative Social Interactions, and Psychological Well‐Being

Karen D. Lincoln.
Social Service Review (2000)

380 Citations

Religious coping among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and non-hispanic whites

Linda M. Chatters;Robert Joseph Taylor;James S. Jackson;Karen D. Lincoln.
Journal of Community Psychology (2008)

325 Citations

African American religious participation: A multi-sample comparison

Linda M. Chatters;Robert Joseph Taylor;Karen D. Lincoln.
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (1999)

302 Citations

Psychological Distress among Black and White Americans: Differential Effects of Social Support, Negative Interaction and Personal Control

Karen D. Lincoln;Linda M. Chatters;Robert Joseph Taylor.
Journal of Health and Social Behavior (2003)

274 Citations

Social Support, Traumatic Events, and Depressive Symptoms Among African Americans.

Karen D Lincoln;Linda M Chatters;Robert Joseph Taylor.
Journal of Marriage and Family (2005)

231 Citations

Patterns of Informal Support from Family and Church Members among African Americans

Linda M. Chatters;Robert Joseph Taylor;Karen D. Lincoln;Tracy Schroepfer.
Journal of Black Studies (2002)

199 Citations

Marital satisfaction among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

Chalandra M. Bryant;Robert Joseph Taylor;Karen D. Lincoln;Linda M. Chatters.
Family Relations (2008)

166 Citations

Do experiences of racial discrimination predict cardiovascular disease among African American Men? The moderating role of internalized negative racial group attitudes

David H. Chae;Karen D Lincoln;Nancy E Adler;S. Leonard Syme.
Social Science & Medicine (2010)

159 Citations

Discriminatory Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among African American Women: Do Skin Tone and Mastery Matter?

Verna M. Keith;Karen D. Lincoln;Robert Joseph Taylor;James S. Jackson.
Sex Roles (2010)

134 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Karen D. Lincoln

Robert Joseph Taylor

Robert Joseph Taylor

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 80

Linda M. Chatters

Linda M. Chatters

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 71

Shervin Assari

Shervin Assari

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

Publications: 38

James S. Jackson

James S. Jackson

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 20

Cheryl L. Holt

Cheryl L. Holt

University of Maryland, College Park

Publications: 15

Roland J. Thorpe

Roland J. Thorpe

Johns Hopkins University

Publications: 13

Neal Krause

Neal Krause

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 11

Mohsen Bazargan

Mohsen Bazargan

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

Publications: 10

Christopher G. Ellison

Christopher G. Ellison

The University of Texas at San Antonio

Publications: 10

Tené T. Lewis

Tené T. Lewis

Emory University

Publications: 9

Joseph A. Himle

Joseph A. Himle

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 8

Lisa L. Barnes

Lisa L. Barnes

Rush University Medical Center

Publications: 8

Kira S. Birditt

Kira S. Birditt

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 7

Ronald L. Simons

Ronald L. Simons

University of Georgia

Publications: 7

Cleopatra H. Caldwell

Cleopatra H. Caldwell

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 7

Nadine J. Kaslow

Nadine J. Kaslow

Emory University

Publications: 6

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