D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Genetics and Molecular Biology D-index 41 Citations 6,489 115 World Ranking 4954 National Ranking 2303

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2004 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Genetics
  • DNA

David W. Severson mainly investigates Genetics, Aedes aegypti, Gene, Anopheles gambiae and Aedes. His research in Genetic marker, Restriction fragment length polymorphism, Genome, Quantitative trait locus and Genetic linkage are components of Genetics. His Aedes aegypti research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Chromosome, Bioassay and Dengue fever, Virology.

His Gene research incorporates themes from Amino acid and Molecular biology. His Anopheles gambiae research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Drosophila melanogaster, Computational biology and Genomics. The various areas that David W. Severson examines in his Aedes study include Arbovirus and Anopheles.

His most cited work include:

  • Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector (949 citations)
  • Evolutionary Dynamics of Immune-Related Genes and Pathways in Disease-Vector Mosquitoes (474 citations)
  • Sequencing of Culex quinquefasciatus Establishes a Platform for Mosquito Comparative Genomics (365 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

David W. Severson mainly focuses on Aedes aegypti, Genetics, Gene, Genome and Virology. His Aedes aegypti study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Gene knockdown, Anopheles gambiae, Drosophila melanogaster and Aedes, Dengue fever. His Anopheles gambiae research incorporates elements of RNA interference, Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles.

As a part of the same scientific study, David W. Severson usually deals with the Drosophila melanogaster, concentrating on Cell biology and frequently concerns with Ventral nerve cord and Anatomy. His research on Gene frequently connects to adjacent areas such as Molecular biology. His Genome research incorporates elements of Chromosome and DNA sequencing.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Aedes aegypti (79.68%)
  • Genetics (61.50%)
  • Gene (35.83%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2013-2021)?

  • Aedes aegypti (79.68%)
  • Genetics (61.50%)
  • Virology (25.13%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

David W. Severson spends much of his time researching Aedes aegypti, Genetics, Virology, RNA interference and RNA. His Aedes aegypti research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Gene knockdown, Aedes, Dengue virus, Dengue fever and Gene silencing. When carried out as part of a general Genetics research project, his work on Gene, Genome, Gene expression and Genomics is frequently linked to work in Doublesex, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of study.

His Virology course of study focuses on Larva and Deltamethrin, Innate immune system and Survivorship curve. His RNA interference research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Anopheles gambiae, Small hairpin RNA and Yeast. His work in Anopheles gambiae addresses issues such as Small interfering RNA, which are connected to fields such as Anopheles.

Between 2013 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon (44 citations)
  • Genomic composition and evolution of Aedes aegypti chromosomes revealed by the analysis of physically mapped supercontigs. (42 citations)
  • Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae. (40 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Genetics

His primary areas of investigation include Aedes aegypti, Genetics, Virology, Dengue fever and Dengue virus. His work carried out in the field of Aedes aegypti brings together such families of science as Zoology, Gene knockdown, Overwintering, Aedes and Gene silencing. His study in Aedes is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Serotype and Genotype.

His study in the fields of Genome, DNA microarray, Gene and Genomics under the domain of Genetics overlaps with other disciplines such as Doublesex. The various areas that he examines in his Genome study include Chromatin, Physical Chromosome Mapping, Minisatellite and DNA sequencing. He combines subjects such as RNA, RNA interference, Small interfering RNA, Mosquito control and Anopheles with his study of Virology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector

Vishvanath Nene;Jennifer R. Wortman;Daniel Lawson;Brian Haas.
Science (2007)

1181 Citations

Evolutionary Dynamics of Immune-Related Genes and Pathways in Disease-Vector Mosquitoes

Robert M. Waterhouse;Evgenia V. Kriventseva;Stephan Meister;Zhiyong Xi.
Science (2007)

576 Citations

Sequencing of Culex quinquefasciatus Establishes a Platform for Mosquito Comparative Genomics

Peter Arensburger;Karine Megy;Robert M Waterhouse;Robert M Waterhouse;Jenica Abrudan.
Science (2010)

465 Citations

VectorBase: a data resource for invertebrate vector genomics

Daniel Lawson;Peter Arensburger;Peter Atkinson;Nora J. Besansky.
Nucleic Acids Research (2009)

254 Citations

An amino acid substitution attributable to insecticide-insensitivity of acetylcholinesterase in a Japanese encephalitis vector mosquito, Culex tritaeniorhynchus.

Takeshi Nabeshima;Akio Mori;Toshinori Kozaki;Yoichi Iwata.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2004)

182 Citations

DNA barcoding of parasites and invertebrate disease vectors: what you don't know can hurt you.

Nora J. Besansky;David W. Severson;Michael T. Ferdig.
Trends in Parasitology (2003)

161 Citations

Codon usage bias: causative factors, quantification methods and genome-wide patterns: with emphasis on insect genomes.

Susanta K. Behura;David W. Severson.
Biological Reviews (2013)

157 Citations

COSTS AND BENEFITS OF MOSQUITO REFRACTORINESS TO MALARIA PARASITES: IMPLICATIONS FOR GENETIC VARIABILITY OF MOSQUITOES AND GENETIC CONTROL OF MALARIA.

Guiyun Yan;David W. Severson;Bruce M. Christensen.
Evolution (1997)

153 Citations

Linkage Map for Aedes aegypti Using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms

D. W. Severson;A. Mori;Y. Zhang;B. M. Christensen.
Journal of Heredity (1993)

146 Citations

VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens

Daniel Lawson;Peter Arensburger;Peter Atkinson;Nora J. Besansky.
Nucleic Acids Research (2007)

131 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing David W. Severson

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William C. Black

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Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics

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National Institutes of Health

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