D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines.

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Medicine D-index 98 Citations 27,878 318 World Ranking 5463 National Ranking 278

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Gene
  • Endocrinology

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Endocrinology, Internal medicine, Vasopressin, Oxytocin and Neuropeptide. The concepts of his Endocrinology study are interwoven with issues in Receptor and Anxiolytic. His Internal medicine study typically links adjacent topics like Antidepressant.

His Vasopressin research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Central nervous system, Neuroscience, Vasopressin receptor, Arginine and Anterior pituitary. His Oxytocin study combines topics in areas such as Cerebrospinal fluid, Hypothalamus and Lactation. His work deals with themes such as Basal, Blood–brain barrier, Antagonist, Extracellular fluid and Anxiogenic, which intersect with Neuropeptide.

His most cited work include:

  • Vasopressin and oxytocin release within the brain: a dynamic concept of multiple and variable modes of neuropeptide communication (781 citations)
  • Balance of brain oxytocin and vasopressin: implications for anxiety, depression, and social behaviors (553 citations)
  • Increased brain and plasma oxytocin after nasal and peripheral administration in rats and mice (357 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Rainer Landgraf mainly focuses on Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Vasopressin, Anxiety and Oxytocin. His Endocrinology and Microdialysis, Supraoptic nucleus, Hypothalamus, Corticosterone and Adrenocorticotropic hormone investigations all form part of his Endocrinology research activities. His Vasopressin research incorporates elements of Push–pull perfusion, Central nervous system, Neuropeptide and Vasopressin receptor, Arginine.

Rainer Landgraf interconnects Neurotransmitter and Receptor antagonist in the investigation of issues within Neuropeptide. His research in Anxiety intersects with topics in Developmental psychology, Phenotype, Neuroscience and Clinical psychology. His Oxytocin study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Lactation and Social defeat.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Internal medicine (57.86%)
  • Endocrinology (56.60%)
  • Vasopressin (34.59%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2009-2019)?

  • Internal medicine (57.86%)
  • Endocrinology (56.60%)
  • Anxiety (27.99%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Rainer Landgraf spends much of his time researching Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Anxiety, Neuroscience and Genetics. His Endocrinology research includes elements of Cerebrospinal fluid and Nasal administration. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Phenotype, Developmental psychology, Clinical psychology, Laboratory mouse and Mitochondrion.

His studies in Neuroscience integrate themes in fields like Neuropeptide S, Genetic predisposition and Anxiolytic. Rainer Landgraf combines subjects such as Hormone, Social behavior, Arginine and Lactation with his study of Vasopressin. His Oxytocin research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Neuropeptide and Radioimmunoassay.

Between 2009 and 2019, his most popular works were:

  • Balance of brain oxytocin and vasopressin: implications for anxiety, depression, and social behaviors (553 citations)
  • Increased brain and plasma oxytocin after nasal and peripheral administration in rats and mice (357 citations)
  • Elevated cerebrospinal fluid and blood concentrations of oxytocin following its intranasal administration in humans (318 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Internal medicine
  • Endocrinology

His primary areas of study are Internal medicine, Endocrinology, Neuroscience, Anxiety and Anxiolytic. Rainer Landgraf has researched Internal medicine in several fields, including Anxiety disorder and Vole. His is involved in several facets of Endocrinology study, as is seen by his studies on Oxytocin, Vasopressin, Corticosterone, Basal and Microdialysis.

His Oxytocin research integrates issues from Neuropeptide, Cerebrospinal fluid and Nasal administration. His Vasopressin research incorporates themes from Developmental psychology, Social behavior and Lactation. His study in Anxiety is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Genetics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, Laboratory mouse and In silico.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Vasopressin and oxytocin release within the brain: a dynamic concept of multiple and variable modes of neuropeptide communication

Rainer Landgraf;Inga D. Neumann.
Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2004)

1150 Citations

Balance of brain oxytocin and vasopressin: implications for anxiety, depression, and social behaviors

Inga D. Neumann;Rainer Landgraf.
Trends in Neurosciences (2012)

868 Citations

The hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis under stress: an old concept revisited.

Mario Engelmann;Rainer Landgraf;Carsten T. Wotjak.
Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology (2004)

581 Citations

V1 vasopressin receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotide into septum reduces vasopressin binding, social discrimination abilities, and anxiety-related behavior in rats

Rainer Landgraf;Riidiger Gerstberger;Alexandra Montkowski;Joseph C. Probst.
The Journal of Neuroscience (1995)

503 Citations

Increased brain and plasma oxytocin after nasal and peripheral administration in rats and mice

Inga D. Neumann;Rodrigue Maloumby;Daniela I. Beiderbeck;Michael Lukas.
Psychoneuroendocrinology (2013)

499 Citations

Dissociated central and peripheral release of vasopressin, but not oxytocin, in response to repeated swim stress: New insights into the secretory capacities of peptidergic neurons

C.T. Wotjak;J. Ganster;G. Kohl;F. Holsboer.
Neuroscience (1998)

489 Citations

Brain oxytocin inhibits basal and stress-induced activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in male and female rats: partial action within the paraventricular nucleus.

I. D. Neumann;A. Wigger;L. Torner;F. Holsboer.
Journal of Neuroendocrinology (2001)

480 Citations

Elevated cerebrospinal fluid and blood concentrations of oxytocin following its intranasal administration in humans

Nadine Striepens;Keith M. Kendrick;Vanessa Hanking;Rainer Landgraf.
Scientific Reports (2013)

469 Citations

Reduced Anxiety, Conditioned Fear, and Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 Receptor-Deficient Mice

Rudolph Marsch;Elisabeth Foeller;Gerhard Rammes;Mirjam Bunck.
The Journal of Neuroscience (2007)

451 Citations

Behavioural profiles of two Wistar rat lines selectively bred for high or low anxiety-related behaviour.

Gudrun Liebsch;Alexandra Montkowski;Florian Holsboer;Rainer Landgraf.
Behavioural Brain Research (1998)

425 Citations

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