H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Economics and Finance D-index 60 Citations 16,883 151 World Ranking 403 National Ranking 9

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2004 - Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences

2003 - Fellows of the Econometric Society

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Statistics
  • Algebra
  • Epistemology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Econometrics, Expected utility hypothesis, Mathematical economics, Prospect theory and Subjective expected utility. His Econometrics study incorporates themes from Loss aversion, Actuarial science, Statistics, Risk aversion and Ambiguity aversion. His Expected utility hypothesis research integrates issues from Event, Generalization and Decision theory.

His Mathematical economics study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Axiom and Probability measure. His research integrates issues of Comonotonicity, Risk aversion and Preference in his study of Prospect theory. His Subjective expected utility research includes elements of Structure and Maximization.

His most cited work include:

  • Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility (1638 citations)
  • Prospect Theory: For Risk and Ambiguity (678 citations)
  • Risk attitudes and decision weights (445 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Mathematical economics, Expected utility hypothesis, Econometrics, Prospect theory and Ambiguity. His research investigates the link between Mathematical economics and topics such as Axiom that cross with problems in Revealed preference. His studies in Expected utility hypothesis integrate themes in fields like Generalization and State space.

The concepts of his Econometrics study are interwoven with issues in Event, Statistics, Measure and Time preference. His Prospect theory research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Loss aversion, Comonotonicity and Risk aversion. His work deals with themes such as Cognitive psychology and Incentive compatibility, which intersect with Ambiguity.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Mathematical economics (46.55%)
  • Expected utility hypothesis (36.73%)
  • Econometrics (25.45%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2013-2021)?

  • Ambiguity (21.09%)
  • Mathematical economics (46.55%)
  • Expected utility hypothesis (36.73%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Peter P. Wakker spends much of his time researching Ambiguity, Mathematical economics, Expected utility hypothesis, Econometrics and Ambiguity aversion. He has included themes like Preference, Prospect theory, Regret and Von Neumann architecture in his Mathematical economics study. His study in Subjective expected utility and Von Neumann–Morgenstern utility theorem is carried out as part of his Expected utility hypothesis studies.

His work in the fields of Two-moment decision model overlaps with other areas such as Foundations of statistics. His studies deal with areas such as Neutrality, Knightian uncertainty and Rationality as well as Econometrics. His work in the fields of Ambiguity aversion, such as Ellsberg paradox, overlaps with other areas such as Natural and Stock market.

Between 2013 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Ambiguity Attitudes in a Large Representative Sample (69 citations)
  • Regret Theory: A Bold Alternative to the Alternatives (53 citations)
  • An experimental test of prospect theory for predicting choice under ambiguity (37 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Statistics
  • Algebra
  • Microeconomics

Peter P. Wakker mainly focuses on Ambiguity, Econometrics, Ambiguity aversion, Actuarial science and Decision theory. His Ambiguity research incorporates themes from Matching, Introspection, Social psychology and Expected utility hypothesis. His Expected utility hypothesis research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Majority rule and Group decision-making.

In his research on the topic of Econometrics, Von Neumann–Morgenstern utility theorem, Prospect theory, Prior probability, Two-moment decision model and Subjective expected utility is strongly related with Predictive power. While the research belongs to areas of Ambiguity aversion, he spends his time largely on the problem of Knightian uncertainty, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Decision analysis. His work carried out in the field of Decision theory brings together such families of science as Welfare economics, Mathematical economics, Regret and Parametric statistics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility

Daniel Kahneman;Peter P. Wakker;Rakesh K. Sarin.
Quarterly Journal of Economics (1997)

2621 Citations

Prospect Theory: For Risk and Ambiguity

Peter P. Wakker.
(2010)

1372 Citations

Additive Representations of Preferences: A New Foundation of Decision Analysis

Peter P. Wakker.
(1988)

777 Citations

Risk attitudes and decision weights

Amos Tversky;Peter Wakker.
Econometrica (1995)

718 Citations

An Index of Loss Aversion

Veronika Köbberling;Peter P. Wakker.
Journal of Economic Theory (2005)

599 Citations

An Axiomatization of Cumulative Prospect Theory

Peter Wakker;Amos Tversky.
Journal of Risk and Uncertainty (1993)

577 Citations

Eliciting von Neumann-Morgenstern Utilities When Probabilities Are Distorted or Unknown

Peter Wakker;Daniel Deneffe.
Management Science (1996)

574 Citations

The Rich Domain of Uncertainty: Source Functions and Their Experimental Implementation

Mohammed Abdellaoui;Aurélien Baillon;Laetitia Placido;Peter P. Wakker.
The American Economic Review (2011)

572 Citations

Additive Representations of Preferences

Peter P. Wakker.
(1989)

441 Citations

Separating Marginal Utility and Probabilistic Risk Aversion

Peter Wakker.
Theory and Decision (1994)

407 Citations

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