D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 46 Citations 12,835 80 World Ranking 2672 National Ranking 73

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Neuron
  • Internal medicine

Neuroscience, Dendritic spine, Synapse, Cell biology and Neocortex are his primary areas of study. His research on Neuroscience often connects related topics like Synaptic plasticity. His research in Dendritic spine intersects with topics in Cerebral cortex, Postsynaptic density, Spine and Barrel cortex.

His studies in Neocortex integrate themes in fields like Anatomy and In vivo. His In vivo study incorporates themes from Neuroplasticity, Bioinformatics and High resolution imaging. His Neuroplasticity research incorporates elements of Electrophysiology, Biomedical engineering and Microscopy.

His most cited work include:

  • Long-term in vivo imaging of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity in adult cortex (1561 citations)
  • Transient and Persistent Dendritic Spines in the Neocortex In Vivo (883 citations)
  • Long-term, high-resolution imaging in the mouse neocortex through a chronic cranial window (656 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Neuroscience, Central nervous system, Anatomy, Cell biology and Synapse. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Synaptic plasticity and In vivo. The Anatomy study which covers Spinal cord that intersects with Lesion.

His work in Synapse addresses issues such as Axon, which are connected to fields such as Neuron. The concepts of his Dendritic spine study are interwoven with issues in Ultrastructure, Postsynaptic density, Spine and Barrel cortex. His Neocortex research incorporates themes from Fetuin and Neuroplasticity.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (37.68%)
  • Central nervous system (18.84%)
  • Anatomy (17.87%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Neuroscience (37.68%)
  • Segmentation (10.63%)
  • Ultrastructure (7.25%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Graham Knott focuses on Neuroscience, Segmentation, Ultrastructure, Cell biology and Axon. In his research, Synaptic plasticity is intimately related to Neurotransmission, which falls under the overarching field of Neuroscience. He has researched Ultrastructure in several fields, including Fixation, Dendritic spine, Ultrashort pulse, Scanning electron microscope and Isotropy.

His Anatomy research extends to the thematically linked field of Dendritic spine. Many of his research projects under Cell biology are closely connected to MFN2 with MFN2, tying the diverse disciplines of science together. While the research belongs to areas of Axon, Graham Knott spends his time largely on the problem of Somatosensory system, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Nerve conduction velocity, SMA* and Spinal cord.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Synaptic proximity enables NMDAR signalling to promote brain metastasis (117 citations)
  • The process of Lewy body formation, rather than simply α-synuclein fibrillization, is one of the major drivers of neurodegeneration (77 citations)
  • Locally coordinated synaptic plasticity of visual cortex neurons in vivo (71 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Neuron
  • Internal medicine

His main research concerns Neuroscience, Cell biology, Lewy body, Axon and Somatosensory system. His research in Neuroscience is mostly concerned with Excitatory postsynaptic potential. He usually deals with Cell biology and limits it to topics linked to Neurodegeneration and Proteostasis, Mitochondrial fission and Repressor.

His Axon study introduces a deeper knowledge of Anatomy. The various areas that Graham Knott examines in his Somatosensory system study include Ultrastructure, Dendritic spine, Inhibitory postsynaptic potential, SMA* and Synapse. The study incorporates disciplines such as AMPA receptor, Receptive field and Visual cortex in addition to Long-term potentiation.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Long-term in vivo imaging of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity in adult cortex

Joshua T. Trachtenberg;Brian E. Chen;Graham W. Knott;Guoping Feng.
Nature (2002)

2037 Citations

Transient and Persistent Dendritic Spines in the Neocortex In Vivo

Anthony J.G.D. Holtmaat;Joshua T. Trachtenberg;Linda Wilbrecht;Gordon M. Shepherd.
Neuron (2005)

1105 Citations

Long-term, high-resolution imaging in the mouse neocortex through a chronic cranial window

Anthony Holtmaat;Anthony Holtmaat;Tobias Bonhoeffer;David K Chow;Jyoti Chuckowree.
Nature Protocols (2009)

801 Citations

Mitonuclear protein imbalance as a conserved longevity mechanism

Riekelt H. Houtkooper;Laurent Mouchiroud;Dongryeol Ryu;Norman Moullan.
Nature (2013)

739 Citations

Experience-dependent and cell-type-specific spine growth in the neocortex.

Anthony Holtmaat;Linda Wilbrecht;Graham W Knott;Egbert Welker.
Nature (2006)

657 Citations

Serial section scanning electron microscopy of adult brain tissue using focused ion beam milling.

Graham Knott;Herschel Marchman;David Wall;Ben Lich.
The Journal of Neuroscience (2008)

639 Citations

Spine growth precedes synapse formation in the adult neocortex in vivo.

Graham W Knott;Anthony Holtmaat;Linda Wilbrecht;Egbert Welker.
Nature Neuroscience (2006)

584 Citations

Experience and activity-dependent maturation of perisomatic GABAergic innervation in primary visual cortex during a postnatal critical period.

Bidisha Chattopadhyaya;Graziella Di Cristo;Hiroyuki Higashiyama;Graham W. Knott.
The Journal of Neuroscience (2004)

569 Citations

Formation of dendritic spines with GABAergic synapses induced by whisker stimulation in adult mice

Graham W. Knott;Charles Quairiaux;Christel Genoud;Egbert Welker.
Neuron (2002)

511 Citations

Cell Type-Specific Structural Plasticity of Axonal Branches and Boutons in the Adult Neocortex

Vincenzo De Paola;Anthony Holtmaat;Graham Knott;Sen Song.
Neuron (2006)

432 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Graham Knott

Johan Auwerx

Johan Auwerx

École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Publications: 62

Norman R. Saunders

Norman R. Saunders

University of Melbourne

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Katarzyna M. Dziegielewska

Katarzyna M. Dziegielewska

University of Melbourne

Publications: 48

Javier DeFelipe

Javier DeFelipe

Technical University of Madrid

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Karel Svoboda

Karel Svoboda

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

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David A. Lewis

David A. Lewis

University of Pittsburgh

Publications: 37

Riekelt H. Houtkooper

Riekelt H. Houtkooper

University of Amsterdam

Publications: 35

Moritz Helmstaedter

Moritz Helmstaedter

Max Planck Society

Publications: 33

Z. Josh Huang

Z. Josh Huang

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Publications: 33

Shigeo Okabe

Shigeo Okabe

University of Tokyo

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Pierre J. Magistretti

Pierre J. Magistretti

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Publications: 32

Fred A. Hamprecht

Fred A. Hamprecht

Heidelberg University

Publications: 31

Elly Nedivi

Elly Nedivi

MIT

Publications: 31

Tobias Bonhoeffer

Tobias Bonhoeffer

Max Planck Society

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Christian Henneberger

Christian Henneberger

University of Bonn

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Gilles Bonvento

Gilles Bonvento

University of Paris-Saclay

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Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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