H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience H-index 32 Citations 5,814 50 World Ranking 5000 National Ranking 2158

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Neuron
  • Neuroscience
  • Hippocampus

Gene J. Blatt mainly focuses on Neuroscience, Autism, GABAergic, Cerebellum and Hippocampus. His Neuroscience research incorporates elements of Calbindin d28k and Anatomy. His Autism study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Anterior cingulate cortex, Posterior cingulate, Fusiform gyrus and Brain mapping.

His work deals with themes such as GABAB receptor, Cingulate cortex and Developmental disorder, which intersect with GABAergic. The various areas that Gene J. Blatt examines in his Cerebellum study include Neurology, Serotonergic and Motor control. His Hippocampus research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Hippocampal formation, Working memory, Consumer neuroscience and Amygdala.

His most cited work include:

  • Visual receptive field organization and cortico-cortical connections of the lateral intraparietal area (area LIP) in the macaque (493 citations)
  • Consensus Paper: Pathological Role of the Cerebellum in Autism (422 citations)
  • Topographically specific hippocampal projections target functionally distinct prefrontal areas in the rhesus monkey (355 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Neuroscience, Autism, Cerebellum, GABAergic and Hippocampus. Gene J. Blatt integrates Neuroscience with In situ hybridization in his study. His Autism research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Posterior cingulate, Fusiform gyrus, Cingulate cortex and Limbic system.

His Cerebellum study combines topics in areas such as Inhibitory postsynaptic potential and Anatomy. His GABAergic research integrates issues from Neurodevelopmental disorder, Medium spiny neuron and GABAA receptor. His Hippocampus research incorporates themes from Hippocampal formation, Neurochemical and Posterior parietal cortex.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (72.41%)
  • Autism (39.66%)
  • Cerebellum (32.76%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Autism (39.66%)
  • Neuroscience (72.41%)
  • Induced pluripotent stem cell (5.17%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Autism, Neuroscience, Induced pluripotent stem cell, Cerebellum and Parvalbumin. In the subject of general Autism, his work in Neurotypical is often linked to Editorial board, thereby combining diverse domains of study. His work carried out in the field of Neuroscience brings together such families of science as Calcium-binding protein and Ion channel.

His studies in Cerebellum integrate themes in fields like Nervous system and Cell biology. Gene J. Blatt combines subjects such as Cerebral cortex and Prefrontal cortex with his study of Parvalbumin. His work carried out in the field of Basal ganglia brings together such families of science as GABAergic and Putamen.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Basal ganglia and autism - a translational perspective. (23 citations)
  • Decreased parvalbumin mRNA levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells in autism. (20 citations)
  • Human Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cells and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Emerging Technologies. (20 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Neuron
  • Neuroscience
  • Hippocampus

Gene J. Blatt focuses on Autism, Neuroscience, Cerebellum, Neuropathology and Prefrontal cortex. Gene J. Blatt works in the field of Neuroscience, namely Basal ganglia. His work on Indirect pathway of movement as part of general Basal ganglia research is often related to Genetic model, thus linking different fields of science.

His Neuropathology research incorporates a variety of disciplines, including Parvalbumin, In situ hybridization and Cerebral cortex. His Cell type study incorporates themes from Optogenetics and Autism spectrum disorder. Gene J. Blatt incorporates Optogenetics and Cell based in his studies.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Visual receptive field organization and cortico-cortical connections of the lateral intraparietal area (area LIP) in the macaque

Gene J. Blatt;Richard A. Andersen;Gene R. Stoner.
The Journal of Comparative Neurology (1990)

651 Citations

Consensus Paper: Pathological Role of the Cerebellum in Autism

S. Hossein Fatemi;Kimberly A. Aldinger;Paul Ashwood;Margaret L. Bauman.
The Cerebellum (2012)

602 Citations

Topographically specific hippocampal projections target functionally distinct prefrontal areas in the rhesus monkey

Helen Barbas;Gene J. Blatt.
Hippocampus (1995)

543 Citations

Density and distribution of hippocampal neurotransmitter receptors in autism: an autoradiographic study.

Gene J. Blatt;Claudia M. Fitzgerald;Jeffrey T. Guptill;Anne B. Booker.
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (2001)

403 Citations

Decreased GAD67 mRNA levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells in autism: pathophysiological implications

Jane Yip;Jean-Jacques Soghomonian;Gene J. Blatt.
Acta Neuropathologica (2007)

286 Citations

Cerebellar Purkinje Cells are Reduced in a Subpopulation of Autistic Brains: A Stereological Experiment Using Calbindin-D28k

Elizabeth R. Whitney;Thomas L. Kemper;Margaret L. Bauman;Margaret L. Bauman;Douglas L. Rosene.
The Cerebellum (2008)

248 Citations

The anterior cingulate cortex in autism: heterogeneity of qualitative and quantitative cytoarchitectonic features suggests possible subgroups

Marissa Leigh Simms;Thomas L. Kemper;Clare M. Timbie;Margaret L. Bauman.
Acta Neuropathologica (2009)

209 Citations

Decreased GABAB receptors in the cingulate cortex and fusiform gyrus in Autism

Adrian L. Oblak;Terrell T. Gibbs;Gene J. Blatt.
Journal of Neurochemistry (2010)

206 Citations

Decreased GABAA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites in the anterior cingulate cortex in autism.

A. Oblak;T.T. Gibbs;G.J. Blatt.
Autism Research (2009)

187 Citations

Alterations in GABAergic Biomarkers in the Autism Brain: Research Findings and Clinical Implications

Gene J. Blatt;S. Hossein Fatemi.
Anatomical Record-advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology (2011)

181 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Top Scientists Citing Gene J. Blatt

Helen Barbas

Helen Barbas

Boston University

Publications: 35

Jean Mariani

Jean Mariani

Université Paris Cité

Publications: 27

Richard A. Andersen

Richard A. Andersen

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 26

Patrick R. Hof

Patrick R. Hof

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Publications: 26

Deepak N. Pandya

Deepak N. Pandya

Boston University

Publications: 20

Douglas L. Rosene

Douglas L. Rosene

Boston University

Publications: 20

David G. Amaral

David G. Amaral

University of California, Davis

Publications: 19

Richard Hawkes

Richard Hawkes

University of Calgary

Publications: 19

Declan G. Murphy

Declan G. Murphy

Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Publications: 17

Marcello G. P. Rosa

Marcello G. P. Rosa

Australian Research Council

Publications: 16

Nicole Delhaye-Bouchaud

Nicole Delhaye-Bouchaud

Sorbonne University

Publications: 16

Alexandra L. Joyner

Alexandra L. Joyner

Cornell University

Publications: 16

Dan Goldowitz

Dan Goldowitz

University of British Columbia

Publications: 15

David Q. Beversdorf

David Q. Beversdorf

University of Missouri

Publications: 15

Stewart H. Mostofsky

Stewart H. Mostofsky

Kennedy Krieger Institute

Publications: 14

Something went wrong. Please try again later.