H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 35 Citations 4,652 105 World Ranking 3706 National Ranking 312

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Habitat
  • Ecosystem

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Ecology, Habitat, Vegetation, Ecosystem and Disturbance. His study in Introduced species, Ecological succession, Apex predator, Biodiversity and Wildlife is carried out as part of his studies in Ecology. In his research, Ecological systems theory is intimately related to Animal ecology, which falls under the overarching field of Introduced species.

In his work, he performs multidisciplinary research in Habitat and Context. His study in the fields of Seral community under the domain of Vegetation overlaps with other disciplines such as Dendrochronology. His Ecosystem study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Climate change, Resistance and Environmental resource management.

His most cited work include:

  • Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss (351 citations)
  • Habitat or fuel? Implications of long‐term, post‐fire dynamics for the development of key resources for fauna and fire (134 citations)
  • Multiple threats, or multiplying the threats? Interactions between invasive predators and other ecological disturbances (133 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Biodiversity, Habitat, Vegetation and Agroforestry. In his articles, he combines various disciplines, including Ecology and Context. His work carried out in the field of Biodiversity brings together such families of science as Wildlife conservation, Threatened species and Species diversity.

His Habitat study incorporates themes from Range and Foraging. In his study, Resistance and Ecological systems theory is strongly linked to Disturbance, which falls under the umbrella field of Vegetation. Dale G. Nimmo combines subjects such as Animal ecology and Wildlife management with his study of Introduced species.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (75.78%)
  • Biodiversity (23.44%)
  • Habitat (26.56%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2019-2021)?

  • Ecology (75.78%)
  • Cartography (4.69%)
  • Habitat (26.56%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Ecology, Cartography, Habitat, Free ranging and Camera placement. Many of his studies on Ecology apply to Extinction as well. His work deals with themes such as Mark and recapture and Wildlife, which intersect with Cartography.

His Ideal free distribution study in the realm of Habitat interacts with subjects such as Human settlement. His research investigates the connection between Fauna and topics such as Vegetation that intersect with issues in Threatened species. His work in Population growth addresses issues such as Mammal, which are connected to fields such as Biodiversity.

Between 2019 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Impact of 2019–2020 mega-fires on Australian fauna habitat (32 citations)
  • Predator responses to fire: A global systematic review and meta-analysis. (14 citations)
  • Fire mosaics and habitat choice in nomadic foragers (13 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Habitat
  • Ecosystem

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Habitat, Fauna, Ecosystem management and Extinction. Mesopredator release hypothesis, Abundance, Trophic cascade, Occupancy and Predation are the subjects of his Ecology studies. His study in the field of Ideal free distribution is also linked to topics like Human settlement.

Dale G. Nimmo interconnects Triodia scariosa, Foundation species, Global warming, Species distribution and Arid zone in the investigation of issues within Fauna. His Ecosystem management study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Applied ecology, Ecological systems theory, Ecosystem model and Ecosystem ecology. His Extinction research includes themes of Quantile regression, Statistics, Vegetation and Threatened species.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss.

Tim S. Doherty;Tim S. Doherty;Alistair S. Glen;Dale G. Nimmo;E. G. Ritchie.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

373 Citations

Habitat or fuel? Implications of long‐term, post‐fire dynamics for the development of key resources for fauna and fire

Angie Haslem;Angie Haslem;Luke T. Kelly;Dale G. Nimmo;Simon J. Watson.
Journal of Applied Ecology (2011)

176 Citations

Multiple threats, or multiplying the threats? Interactions between invasive predators and other ecological disturbances

Tim S. Doherty;Chris R. Dickman;Dale G. Nimmo;Dale G. Nimmo;Euan G. Ritchie.
Biological Conservation (2015)

169 Citations

Enumerating a continental-scale threat: How many feral cats are in Australia?

S. Legge;B. P. Murphy;Hugh McGregor;John Woinarski.
Biological Conservation (2017)

134 Citations

Vive la résistance: reviving resistance for 21st century conservation

D.G. Nimmo;D.G. Nimmo;R. Mac Nally;S.C. Cunningham;S.C. Cunningham;A. Haslem;A. Haslem.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2015)

129 Citations

The global impacts of domestic dogs on threatened vertebrates

Tim S Doherty;Chris R Dickman;Alistair S Glen;Thomas M Newsome.
Biological Conservation (2017)

123 Citations

Ecological and human dimensions of management of feral horses in Australia: a review

Dale Graeme Nimmo;Kelly K. Miller.
Wildlife Research (2007)

113 Citations

Landscape‐scale effects of fire on bird assemblages: does pyrodiversity beget biodiversity?

Rick S. Taylor;Simon J. Watson;Dale G. Nimmo;Luke T. Kelly.
Diversity and Distributions (2012)

110 Citations

Effects of time since fire on birds: How informative are generalized fire response curves for conservation management?

Simon J. Watson;Simon J. Watson;Rick S. Taylor;Dale G. Nimmo;Luke T. Kelly;Luke T. Kelly.
Ecological Applications (2012)

95 Citations

Incorporating anthropogenic effects into trophic ecology: predator-prey interactions in a human-dominated landscape.

Ine Dorresteijn;Jannik Schultner;Dale G. Nimmo;Joern Fischer.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2015)

94 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Dale G. Nimmo

Sarah Legge

Sarah Legge

University of Queensland

Publications: 57

Chris R. Dickman

Chris R. Dickman

University of Sydney

Publications: 53

David B. Lindenmayer

David B. Lindenmayer

Australian National University

Publications: 49

Michael A. Weston

Michael A. Weston

Deakin University

Publications: 37

Don A. Driscoll

Don A. Driscoll

Deakin University

Publications: 36

Andrew F. Bennett

Andrew F. Bennett

La Trobe University

Publications: 35

John C. Z. Woinarski

John C. Z. Woinarski

Charles Darwin University

Publications: 34

Mike Letnic

Mike Letnic

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 29

Christopher N. Johnson

Christopher N. Johnson

University of Tasmania

Publications: 29

Matt W. Hayward

Matt W. Hayward

University of Newcastle Australia

Publications: 28

Euan G. Ritchie

Euan G. Ritchie

Deakin University

Publications: 27

Brett P. Murphy

Brett P. Murphy

Charles Darwin University

Publications: 26

David A. Keith

David A. Keith

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 21

Thomas M. Newsome

Thomas M. Newsome

University of Sydney

Publications: 20

Peter J. S. Fleming

Peter J. S. Fleming

University of New England

Publications: 19

Katherine E. Moseby

Katherine E. Moseby

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 19

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