H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 59 Citations 12,919 233 World Ranking 1050 National Ranking 98

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • IUCN Red List
  • Habitat

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Ecology, Predation, Panthera, Crocuta crocuta and Range. His Ecology study frequently involves adjacent topics like Extinction. His research in Predation intersects with topics in Acinonyx jubatus, Lycaon pictus, Leopard and Competition.

His Panthera research focuses on Abundance and how it connects with Persian leopard and Character displacement. The Crocuta crocuta study which covers Hyaena that intersects with National park. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Ecology, Land use, land-use change and forestry, Land use and Ecosystem diversity.

His most cited work include:

  • Collapse of the world's largest herbivores. (475 citations)
  • Prey preferences of the leopard (Panthera pardus) (385 citations)
  • Prey preferences of the lion (Panthera leo) (303 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His main research concerns Ecology, Predation, Panthera, Environmental resource management and Wildlife. His study in Guild, Predator, Habitat, Apex predator and Competition is carried out as part of his Ecology studies. His Predation research integrates issues from Zoology, Acinonyx jubatus and Range.

His Panthera research is multidisciplinary, relying on both National park, Lycaon pictus, Leopard and Hyaena. The concepts of his Environmental resource management study are interwoven with issues in IUCN Red List, Biodiversity, Landscape connectivity and Threatened species. His Wildlife research includes themes of Environmental ethics, Captive breeding and Tourism.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (98.29%)
  • Predation (61.43%)
  • Panthera (31.40%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2019-2021)?

  • Ecology (98.29%)
  • Predation (61.43%)
  • Zoology (22.87%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Predation, Zoology, Panthera and Carnivore. His study in Ecology focuses on Guild, Introduced species, Invasive species, Apex predator and Ecological niche. He works mostly in the field of Guild, limiting it down to topics relating to Vulpes and, in certain cases, Threatened species, Habitat and Mesopredator release hypothesis.

In his research on the topic of Predation, Ungulate is strongly related with Mammal. His work focuses on many connections between Zoology and other disciplines, such as Abundance, that overlap with his field of interest in Optimal foraging theory. His Panthera research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Competition, Leopard and Surplus killing.

Between 2019 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Envisioning the future with ‘compassionate conservation’: An ominous projection for native wildlife and biodiversity (11 citations)
  • Envisioning the future with ‘compassionate conservation’: An ominous projection for native wildlife and biodiversity (11 citations)
  • Envisioning the future with ‘compassionate conservation’: An ominous projection for native wildlife and biodiversity (11 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • IUCN Red List
  • Habitat

Predation, Ecology, Carnivore, Mammal and Guild are his primary areas of study. Leopard and Panthera are among the areas of Ecology where the researcher is concentrating his efforts. His research integrates issues of Lycaon pictus, Ecological niche, Predator, Acinonyx jubatus and Niche differentiation in his study of Leopard.

Matt W. Hayward has included themes like Spatial ecology, Social organization and Home range in his Panthera study. The various areas that Matt W. Hayward examines in his Carnivore study include Zoology, Ungulate and Apex predator. In his study, Habitat, Threatened species, Introduced species and Mesopredator release hypothesis is inextricably linked to Vulpes, which falls within the broad field of Guild.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Prey preferences of the leopard (Panthera pardus)

M. W. Hayward;P. Henschel;J. O'Brien;M. Hofmeyr.
Journal of Zoology (2006)

526 Citations

Collapse of the world's largest herbivores.

William J Ripple;Thomas M Newsome;Thomas M Newsome;Christopher Wolf;Rodolfo Dirzo.
Science Advances (2015)

506 Citations

Prey preferences of the lion (Panthera leo)

Matt W. Hayward;Graham I. H. Kerley.
Journal of Zoology (2005)

458 Citations

Fencing for conservation: Restriction of evolutionary potential or a riposte to threatening processes?

Matt W. Hayward;Matt W. Hayward;Graham I.H. Kerley.
Biological Conservation (2009)

399 Citations

Carrying capacity of large African predators : Predictions and tests

Matt W. Hayward;John O’Brien;Graham I.H. Kerley.
Biological Conservation (2007)

300 Citations

Acting fast helps avoid extinction

Tara G. Martin;Tara G. Martin;Simon Nally;Andrew A. Burbidge;Sophie Arnall.
Conservation Letters (2012)

276 Citations

Prey preferences of the spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta) and degree of dietary overlap with the lion (Panthera leo)

M. W. Hayward.
Journal of Zoology (2006)

264 Citations

Temporal Partitioning of Activity in Large African Carnivores: Tests of Multiple Hypotheses

Matt W. Hayward;Rob Slotow.
South African Journal of Wildlife Research (2009)

229 Citations

Prey preferences of the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) (Felidae: Carnivora): morphological limitations or the need to capture rapidly consumable prey before kleptoparasites arrive?

M. W. Hayward;M. Hofmeyr;J. O'Brien;G. I. H. Kerley.
Journal of Zoology (2006)

213 Citations

The reintroduction of large carnivores to the Eastern Cape, South Africa: an assessment

Matt W. Hayward;Graham I. H. Kerley;John Adendorff;Lucius C. Moolman.
Oryx (2007)

194 Citations

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