H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Environmental Sciences D-index 40 Citations 6,521 68 World Ranking 3241 National Ranking 256

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Social science
  • Psychology

Her primary areas of study are Environmental resource management, Sustainability, Fishing, Coral reef and Fishery. Her Environmental resource management research incorporates themes from Conservation planning and Natural resource economics. Her Sustainability study typically links adjacent topics like Value of life.

Her work in the fields of Marine reserve overlaps with other areas such as Environmental exposure. Her biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Reef, Marine conservation, Biomass and Environmental impact assessment. The Fishery study combines topics in areas such as Nutrient and Nutrient content.

Her most cited work include:

  • A social–ecological approach to conservation planning: embedding social considerations (308 citations)
  • Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs (228 citations)
  • Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs (228 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Her main research concerns Environmental resource management, Coral reef, Ecosystem services, Fishery and Ecosystem. Her Environmental resource management study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Climate change, Adaptive capacity, Sustainability and Fishing. In the subject of general Sustainability, her work in Social sustainability is often linked to Priority areas, Social value orientations and Actual use, thereby combining diverse domains of study.

Her Coral reef study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Reef and Marine protected area, Habitat. Her studies in Ecosystem services integrate themes in fields like Public economics and Value. Her work carried out in the field of Fishery brings together such families of science as Corporate governance and Scale.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Environmental resource management (78.35%)
  • Coral reef (65.98%)
  • Ecosystem services (41.24%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Fishery (36.08%)
  • Livelihood (19.59%)
  • Ecosystem services (41.24%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Christina C. Hicks mainly investigates Fishery, Livelihood, Ecosystem services, Coral reef and Ecosystem. In general Fishery study, her work on Indo-Pacific often relates to the realm of Human nutrition, Marine fish, Saltwater fish and Socio environmental, thereby connecting several areas of interest. The various areas that Christina C. Hicks examines in her Ecosystem services study include Political economy, Public economics and Natural resource management.

Her Coral reef research includes elements of Developing country, Environmental resource management, Recreation, Reef and Poverty. Her Environmental resource management study combines topics in areas such as Social relation, Anthropocene and Sustainable management. In her study, Habitat, Population growth and Protected area is inextricably linked to Biodiversity, which falls within the broad field of Ecosystem.

Between 2017 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • The future of hyperdiverse tropical ecosystems (173 citations)
  • Building adaptive capacity to climate change in tropical coastal communities (152 citations)
  • Harnessing global fisheries to tackle micronutrient deficiencies (106 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Social science
  • Psychology

Fishery, Human rights, Service, Ideology and Corporate governance are her primary areas of study. Her work deals with themes such as Biomass, Seascape and Apex predator, which intersect with Fishery. Her Human rights investigation overlaps with other areas such as Livelihood and Scale.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

A social–ecological approach to conservation planning: embedding social considerations

Natalie C. Ban;Morena Mills;Morena Mills;Jordan Tam;Christina C. Hicks.
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment (2013)

403 Citations

Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

Joshua E. Cinner;Cindy Huchery;M. Aaron MacNeil;M. Aaron MacNeil;M. Aaron MacNeil;Nicholas A.J. Graham;Nicholas A.J. Graham.
Nature (2016)

258 Citations

MALTHUSIAN OVERFISHING AND EFFORTS TO OVERCOME IT ON KENYAN CORAL REEFS

Tim R. McClanahan;Christina C. Hicks;Emily S. Darling.
Ecological Applications (2008)

240 Citations

The future of hyperdiverse tropical ecosystems

Jos Barlow;Filipe França;Filipe França;Toby A. Gardner;Christina C. Hicks.
Nature (2018)

228 Citations

Building adaptive capacity to climate change in tropical coastal communities

Joshua E. Cinner;W. Neil Adger;Edward H. Allison;Michele L. Barnes;Michele L. Barnes.
Nature Climate Change (2018)

209 Citations

Evaluating Social and Ecological Vulnerability of Coral Reef Fisheries to Climate Change

Joshua E. Cinner;Cindy Huchery;Emily S. Darling;Austin T. Humphries;Austin T. Humphries.
PLOS ONE (2013)

194 Citations

Engage key social concepts for sustainability

Christina C. Hicks;Christina C. Hicks;Christina C. Hicks;Arielle Levine;Arun Agrawal;Xavier Basurto.
Science (2016)

180 Citations

Responding to change: Using scenarios to understand how socioeconomic factors may influence amplifying or dampening exploitation feedbacks among Tanzanian fishers

Joshua E. Cinner;Carl Folke;Tim Daw;Christina C. Hicks.
Global Environmental Change-human and Policy Dimensions (2011)

167 Citations

Harnessing global fisheries to tackle micronutrient deficiencies

Christina C. Hicks;Christina C. Hicks;Philippa J. Cohen;Philippa J. Cohen;Nicholas A. J. Graham;Nicholas A. J. Graham;Kirsty L. Nash.
Nature (2019)

138 Citations

Assessing Gear Modifications Needed to Optimize Yields in a Heavily Exploited, Multi-Species, Seagrass and Coral Reef Fishery

Christina C. Hicks;Timothy R. McClanahan.
PLOS ONE (2012)

134 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Christina C. Hicks

Nicholas A. J. Graham

Nicholas A. J. Graham

Lancaster University

Publications: 79

Tim R. McClanahan

Tim R. McClanahan

Wildlife Conservation Society

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Nathan J. Bennett

Nathan J. Bennett

University of British Columbia

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Joshua E. Cinner

Joshua E. Cinner

James Cook University

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David Mouillot

David Mouillot

University of Montpellier

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Jos Barlow

Jos Barlow

Lancaster University

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John N. Kittinger

John N. Kittinger

Arizona State University

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Shaun K. Wilson

Shaun K. Wilson

University of Western Australia

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Berta Martín-López

Berta Martín-López

Leuphana University of Lüneburg

Publications: 31

Natalie C. Ban

Natalie C. Ban

University of Victoria

Publications: 27

Nadine Marshall

Nadine Marshall

James Cook University

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Elizabeth A. Fulton

Elizabeth A. Fulton

University of Tasmania

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Alistair J. Hobday

Alistair J. Hobday

Illinois Tool Works (United States)

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Robert L. Pressey

Robert L. Pressey

James Cook University

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Peter J. Mumby

Peter J. Mumby

University of Queensland

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Maria Beger

Maria Beger

University of Leeds

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