D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Genetics and Molecular Biology D-index 60 Citations 11,408 188 World Ranking 2441 National Ranking 1198

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2011 - Member of the National Academy of Sciences

2006 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2001 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Genetics

Genetics, Meiosis, Chromosome segregation, Homologous chromosome and Synaptonemal complex are his primary areas of study. His work in Synapsis, Drosophila melanogaster, Metaphase, Mutation and Chiasma is related to Genetics. His Meiosis study incorporates themes from Genetic recombination, Centromere, Meiotic chromosome segregation, Cell biology and Heterochromatin.

His work in Chromosome segregation addresses subjects such as Nondisjunction, which are connected to disciplines such as Locus, Microtubule, Nod and Kinesin. R. Scott Hawley has researched Homologous chromosome in several fields, including Prophase and Sister chromatids. His study looks at the relationship between Synaptonemal complex and fields such as Homologous recombination, as well as how they intersect with chemical problems.

His most cited work include:

  • The genetics and molecular biology of the synaptonemal complex. (531 citations)
  • Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet. (361 citations)
  • Direct Evidence of a Role for Heterochromatin in Meiotic Chromosome Segregation (343 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Genetics, Meiosis, Drosophila melanogaster, Cell biology and Homologous chromosome. Gene, Synapsis, Chromosome, Homologous recombination and Nondisjunction are subfields of Genetics in which his conducts study. He interconnects Metaphase and Chromosome segregation in the investigation of issues within Meiosis.

His Drosophila melanogaster study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Evolutionary biology, Genome, Drosophila and X chromosome. His studies in Cell biology integrate themes in fields like Spindle apparatus, Chromosome movement, Kinetochore and Drosophila Protein. The various areas that R. Scott Hawley examines in his Homologous chromosome study include Balancer chromosome, Genetic recombination and Sister chromatids.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Genetics (109.29%)
  • Meiosis (85.71%)
  • Drosophila melanogaster (43.21%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2020)?

  • Drosophila melanogaster (43.21%)
  • Meiosis (85.71%)
  • Cell biology (44.64%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Drosophila melanogaster, Meiosis, Cell biology, Genetics and Synaptonemal complex. R. Scott Hawley has included themes like Evolutionary biology and Genome in his Drosophila melanogaster study. His work on Chromosomal crossover as part of his general Meiosis study is frequently connected to Crossover, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science.

His research in Chromosomal crossover intersects with topics in Synapsis, Spindle apparatus, Interference and Bivalent. R. Scott Hawley combines subjects such as DNA, Homologous recombination, Cohesin and Chromosome segregation with his study of Cell biology. His study explores the link between Synaptonemal complex and topics such as Microscopy that cross with problems in Sister chromatids.

Between 2016 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • Superresolution expansion microscopy reveals the three-dimensional organization of the Drosophila synaptonemal complex. (79 citations)
  • Superresolution expansion microscopy reveals the three-dimensional organization of the Drosophila synaptonemal complex. (79 citations)
  • Highly Contiguous Genome Assemblies of 15 Drosophila Species Generated Using Nanopore Sequencing (73 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Genetics

R. Scott Hawley mostly deals with Drosophila melanogaster, Genome, Genetics, Nanopore sequencing and Sequence assembly. R. Scott Hawley is interested in Melanogaster, which is a field of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics is a component of his Meiosis, Model organism, Euchromatin, Chromosome 4 and Isochromosome studies.

His Meiosis research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Homologous chromosome, Chromosome segregation and Cell biology. His Cell biology study combines topics in areas such as Synapsis, Sister chromatids, Spindle apparatus and Bivalent. The concepts of his Nanopore sequencing study are interwoven with issues in Evolutionary biology, Drosophila and Contig.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The genetics and molecular biology of the synaptonemal complex.

Scott L Page;R Scott Hawley.
Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology (2004)

824 Citations

Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

Scott L. Page;R. Scott Hawley.
Science (2003)

560 Citations

Direct Evidence of a Role for Heterochromatin in Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

Abby F. Dernburg;John W. Sedat;R.Scott Hawley.
Cell (1996)

416 Citations

Homologous chromosome interactions in meiosis: diversity amidst conservation.

Jennifer L. Gerton;Jennifer L. Gerton;R. Scott Hawley;R. Scott Hawley.
Nature Reviews Genetics (2005)

341 Citations

The mei.41 Gene of D. melanogaster Is a Structural and Functional Homolog of the Human Ataxia Telangiectasia Gene

Kumar L Hari;Anne Santerre;Jeff J Sekelsky;Kim S McKim.
Cell (1995)

318 Citations

Meiotic Synapsis in the Absence of Recombination

Kim S. McKim;Becky L. Green-Marroquin;Jeff J. Sekelsky;Gregory Chin.
Science (1998)

307 Citations

A kinesin-like protein required for distributive chromosome segregation in Drosophila.

Ping Zhang;Brenda A. Knowles;Lawrence S.B. Goldstein;R.Scott Hawley.
Cell (1990)

242 Citations

Recombination and nondisjunction in humans and flies

Kara E. Koehler;R. Scott Hawley;Stephanie Sherman;Stephanie Sherman;Terry Hassold.
Human Molecular Genetics (1996)

228 Citations

There are two mechanisms of achiasmate segregation in Drosophila females, one of which requires heterochromatic homology.

R. Scott Hawley;Holly Irick;Deana A. Haddox;Michelle D. Whitley.
Developmental Genetics (1992)

226 Citations

Chromosomal Control of Meiotic Cell Division

Kim S. McKim;R. Scott Hawley.
Science (1995)

226 Citations

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