H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 47 Citations 16,403 74 World Ranking 2003 National Ranking 729

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Agriculture

His primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Ecosystem, Soil water, Soil organic matter and Microbial population biology. As part of his studies on Ecology, Matthew D. Wallenstein frequently links adjacent subjects like Environmental chemistry. His work is dedicated to discovering how Ecosystem, Biogeochemical cycle are connected with Biomass and Terrestrial ecosystem and other disciplines.

His work carried out in the field of Soil water brings together such families of science as Organic matter and Q10, Respiration. Matthew D. Wallenstein has included themes like Decomposition and Humus in his Soil organic matter study. He interconnects Climate change and Disturbance in the investigation of issues within Microbial population biology.

His most cited work include:

  • MICROBIAL STRESS‐RESPONSE PHYSIOLOGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION (1342 citations)
  • Stoichiometry of soil enzyme activity at global scale (1043 citations)
  • The Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework integrates plant litter decomposition with soil organic matter stabilization: do labile plant inputs form stable soil organic matter? (1035 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Matthew D. Wallenstein mainly focuses on Ecology, Soil water, Ecosystem, Microbial population biology and Environmental chemistry. His Soil water research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Enzyme assay and Agronomy. The various areas that Matthew D. Wallenstein examines in his Ecosystem study include Global warming, Growing season and Abiotic component.

His work in Microbial population biology addresses issues such as Biomass, which are connected to fields such as Carbon cycle. In his research, Plant litter is intimately related to Decomposition, which falls under the overarching field of Environmental chemistry. He interconnects Organic matter, Humus and Botany in the investigation of issues within Soil organic matter.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (48.91%)
  • Soil water (33.58%)
  • Ecosystem (27.74%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2020)?

  • Ecology (48.91%)
  • Ecosystem (27.74%)
  • Soil carbon (13.14%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Matthew D. Wallenstein mainly investigates Ecology, Ecosystem, Soil carbon, Soil water and Agronomy. His Ecology study frequently links to other fields, such as Rhizosphere. His work deals with themes such as Environmental chemistry, Soil management and Climate change, which intersect with Ecosystem.

Matthew D. Wallenstein combines subjects such as Biomass and Soil ecology with his study of Soil carbon. His Soil horizon study, which is part of a larger body of work in Soil water, is frequently linked to Vegetation type, bridging the gap between disciplines. His research integrates issues of Plant soil, Nutrient, Water content and Soil conditioner in his study of Agronomy.

Between 2016 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • Understanding how microbiomes influence the systems they inhabit. (66 citations)
  • Below-ground connections underlying above-ground food production: a framework for optimising ecological connections in the rhizosphere (64 citations)
  • Managing and manipulating the rhizosphere microbiome for plant health: A systems approach (47 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Agriculture

His primary scientific interests are in Agriculture, Rhizosphere, Ecology, Crop and Microbiome. His Agriculture study incorporates themes from Soil biology, Soil food web and Biofertilizer. His Rhizosphere research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Biomass, Microbial population biology, Soil chemistry and Grassland.

Ecology and Natural selection are two areas of study in which he engages in interdisciplinary research. His Crop research includes elements of Biotechnology and Crop yield. The study incorporates disciplines such as Global warming, Ecosystem and Catalysis in addition to Microbial ecology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

MICROBIAL STRESS‐RESPONSE PHYSIOLOGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION

Joshua Schimel;Teri C. Balser;Matthew Wallenstein.
Ecology (2007)

1687 Citations

The Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework integrates plant litter decomposition with soil organic matter stabilization: do labile plant inputs form stable soil organic matter?

M. Francesca Cotrufo;Matthew D. Wallenstein;Claudia M. Boot;Karolien Denef.
Global Change Biology (2013)

1350 Citations

Soil enzymes in a changing environment: Current knowledge and future directions

Richard G. Burns;Jared L. DeForest;Juergen Marxsen;Robert L. Sinsabaugh.
Soil Biology & Biochemistry (2013)

1283 Citations

Stoichiometry of soil enzyme activity at global scale

Robert L. Sinsabaugh;Christian L. Lauber;Michael N. Weintraub;Bony Ahmed.
Ecology Letters (2008)

1193 Citations

Soil-carbon response to warming dependent on microbial physiology

Steven D. Allison;Matthew D. Wallenstein;Mark A. Bradford.
Nature Geoscience (2010)

1050 Citations

Temperature and soil organic matter decomposition rates – synthesis of current knowledge and a way forward

Richard T. Conant;Richard T. Conant;Michael G. Ryan;Göran I. Ågren;Hannah E. Birge.
Global Change Biology (2011)

967 Citations

Thermal adaptation of soil microbial respiration to elevated temperature.

Mark A. Bradford;Christian A. Davies;Serita D. Frey;Thomas R. Maddox.
Ecology Letters (2008)

654 Citations

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON DENITRIFYING COMMUNITIES AND DENITRIFICATION RATES: INSIGHTS FROM MOLECULAR METHODS

Matthew D. Wallenstein;David D. Myrold;Mary Firestone;Mary Voytek.
Ecological Applications (2006)

489 Citations

Decoupling of soil nutrient cycles as a function of aridity in global drylands

Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo;Fernando T. Maestre;Antonio Gallardo;Matthew A. Bowker.
Nature (2013)

400 Citations

Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

Katherine C. Goldfarb;Katherine C. Goldfarb;Ulas Karaoz;China A. Hanson;Clark A. Santee.
Frontiers in Microbiology (2011)

380 Citations

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