D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 62 Citations 16,768 184 World Ranking 876 National Ranking 319

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Habitat
  • Statistics

Mark Hebblewhite mostly deals with Ecology, Predation, Habitat, Canis and National park. His work on Selection expands to the thematically related Ecology. His Predation research includes themes of Cartography and Cervus elaphus.

His study looks at the relationship between Habitat and fields such as Wildlife, as well as how they intersect with chemical problems. His Canis course of study focuses on Population density and Beaver and Riparian zone. Mark Hebblewhite studied Species richness and Mesopredator release hypothesis that intersect with Trophic cascade.

His most cited work include:

  • Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores. (1547 citations)
  • Application of random effects to the study of resource selection by animals (540 citations)
  • Distinguishing technology from biology: a critical review of the use of GPS telemetry data in ecology (384 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Ecology, Predation, Habitat, Ungulate and Wildlife. His study in Ecology concentrates on Range, Threatened species, Woodland caribou, Canis and Endangered species. Cervus elaphus is closely connected to National park in his research, which is encompassed under the umbrella topic of Predation.

His studies in Habitat integrate themes in fields like Fishery, Resource, Ecosystem and Selection. In his study, which falls under the umbrella issue of Ungulate, Mountain lion and Ursus is strongly linked to Carnivore. His study in the field of Vital rates also crosses realms of Demography.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (76.79%)
  • Predation (32.07%)
  • Habitat (27.00%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Ecology (76.79%)
  • Ungulate (24.05%)
  • Habitat (27.00%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Ecology, Ungulate, Habitat, Predation and Herbivore. His study involves Phenology, Habitat destruction, Climate change, Predator and Foraging, a branch of Ecology. Mark Hebblewhite has included themes like Range, Life history theory, Disturbance, Density dependence and Carnivore in his Ungulate study.

His Range research focuses on subjects like Endangered species, which are linked to Woodland caribou. The study incorporates disciplines such as Steppe, Resource and Selection in addition to Habitat. The concepts of his Predation study are interwoven with issues in Vital rates, Boreal, Species richness and Ecosystem.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Longest terrestrial migrations and movements around the world (58 citations)
  • Saving endangered species using adaptive management. (35 citations)
  • Integrating snow science and wildlife ecology in Arctic-boreal North America (20 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Habitat
  • Statistics

His main research concerns Ecology, Habitat, Ungulate, Herbivore and Predation. His study in Foraging, Functional response, Sympatric speciation, Climate change and Habitat destruction falls under the purview of Ecology. The various areas that Mark Hebblewhite examines in his Habitat study include Agroforestry, Resource, Selection and Wildlife.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Rangifer tarandus caribou, Ecology, Environmental resource management and Threatened species. His Herbivore research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Density dependence, Spring and Bison bison. His work carried out in the field of Predation brings together such families of science as Conservation planning, Endangered species, Ecosystem and Guild.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores.

William J. Ripple;James A. Estes;Robert L. Beschta;Christopher C. Wilmers.
Science (2014)

2182 Citations

Application of random effects to the study of resource selection by animals

Cameron S. Gillies;Mark Hebblewhite;Scott E. Nielsen;Meg A. Krawchuk.
Journal of Animal Ecology (2006)

723 Citations

Distinguishing technology from biology: a critical review of the use of GPS telemetry data in ecology

Mark Hebblewhite;Daniel T. Haydon.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2010)

561 Citations

Human Activity Mediates a Trophic Cascade Caused by Wolves

Mark Hebblewhite;Clifford A. White;Clifford A. White;Clifford G. Nietvelt;John A. McKenzie;John A. McKenzie.
Ecology (2005)

524 Citations

A MULTI‐SCALE TEST OF THE FORAGE MATURATION HYPOTHESIS IN A PARTIALLY MIGRATORY UNGULATE POPULATION

Mark Hebblewhite;Evelyn Merrill;Greg McDermid.
Ecological Monographs (2008)

429 Citations

Modelling wildlife–human relationships for social species with mixed‐effects resource selection models

Mark Hebblewhite;Evelyn Merrill.
Journal of Applied Ecology (2007)

415 Citations

Ecological Consequences of Sea-Ice Decline

Eric Post;Uma S. Bhatt;Cecilia M. Bitz;Jedediah F. Brodie.
Science (2013)

415 Citations

Resolving issues of imprecise and habitat-biased locations in ecological analyses using GPS telemetry data.

Jacqueline L. Frair;John R Fieberg;Mark Hebblewhite;Francesca Cagnacci.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2010)

395 Citations

The interpretation of habitat preference metrics under use–availability designs

Hawthorne L. Beyer;Daniel T. Haydon;Juan M. Morales;Jacqueline L. Frair.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2010)

384 Citations

Habitat–performance relationships: finding the right metric at a given spatial scale

Jean-Michel Gaillard;Mark Hebblewhite;Anne Loison;Mark Fuller.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2010)

335 Citations

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Best Scientists Citing Mark Hebblewhite

William J. Ripple

William J. Ripple

Oregon State University

Publications: 77

Mark S. Boyce

Mark S. Boyce

University of Alberta

Publications: 74

David W. Macdonald

David W. Macdonald

University of Oxford

Publications: 72

Matt W. Hayward

Matt W. Hayward

University of Newcastle Australia

Publications: 56

Atle Mysterud

Atle Mysterud

University of Oslo

Publications: 55

Roland Kays

Roland Kays

North Carolina State University

Publications: 45

Stan Boutin

Stan Boutin

University of Alberta

Publications: 45

Luke T. B. Hunter

Luke T. B. Hunter

Wildlife Conservation Society

Publications: 43

Marco Heurich

Marco Heurich

University of Freiburg

Publications: 42

Daniel Fortin

Daniel Fortin

Université Laval

Publications: 41

John D. C. Linnell

John D. C. Linnell

Norwegian Institute for Nature Research

Publications: 40

Thomas M. Newsome

Thomas M. Newsome

University of Sydney

Publications: 40

Mike Letnic

Mike Letnic

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 38

Scott Creel

Scott Creel

Montana State University

Publications: 38

James E. M. Watson

James E. M. Watson

University of Queensland

Publications: 37

Robert A. Garrott

Robert A. Garrott

Montana State University

Publications: 34

Trending Scientists

Don H. Johnson

Don H. Johnson

Rice University

John Stasko

John Stasko

Georgia Institute of Technology

Clemens Brunner

Clemens Brunner

University of Graz

Eric C. Frey

Eric C. Frey

Johns Hopkins University

Karsten Horn

Karsten Horn

Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society

Jerzy Jurka

Jerzy Jurka

Genetic Information Research Institute

Carlo Giuseppe Rizzello

Carlo Giuseppe Rizzello

Sapienza University of Rome

Michael Hust

Michael Hust

Technische Universität Braunschweig

Ellis E. Remsberg

Ellis E. Remsberg

Langley Research Center

G.H. Jones

G.H. Jones

Emory University

Federico Ranieri

Federico Ranieri

University of Verona

Nathalie George

Nathalie George

Université Paris Cité

Marion Murray

Marion Murray

Drexel University

Stephen C. De Rosa

Stephen C. De Rosa

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Yu Kai Chang

Yu Kai Chang

California Institute of Technology

Matthijs K. C. Hesselink

Matthijs K. C. Hesselink

Maastricht University

Something went wrong. Please try again later.