D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Environmental Sciences D-index 63 Citations 14,909 150 World Ranking 907 National Ranking 14

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Archaeology
  • Ecology
  • Paleontology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Archaeology, Middle Stone Age, Cave, Howiesons Poort and Behavioral modernity. His study in Middle Paleolithic, Taphonomy, Aurignacian, Neanderthal and Beadwork is carried out as part of his studies in Archaeology. His study in Middle Stone Age is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Prehistory, Upper Paleolithic and Homo sapiens.

His Cave research incorporates themes from Later Stone Age and Engraving. His Behavioral modernity research incorporates elements of Anthropology, Aterian, Cognitive archaeology and Musical. As a part of the same scientific family, Francesco d'Errico mostly works in the field of Paleontology, focusing on Bone tool and, on occasion, Mesolithic and Projectile point.

His most cited work include:

  • Emergence of modern human behavior: Middle Stone Age engravings from South Africa. (598 citations)
  • Neanderthal acculturation in western Europe? A critical review of the evidence and its interpretation (443 citations)
  • Nassarius kraussianus shell beads from Blombos Cave: evidence for symbolic behaviour in the Middle Stone Age (424 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Archaeology, Cave, Middle Stone Age, Paleontology and Ecology. His study on Taphonomy, Aurignacian, Mousterian and Middle Paleolithic is often connected to Ornaments as part of broader study in Archaeology. His research in Cave intersects with topics in Engraving, Shell, Sequence and Mesolithic.

His Middle Stone Age study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Later Stone Age, Period and Homo sapiens. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Context and Bone tool. His work deals with themes such as Prehistory, Archaeological record and Human evolution, which intersect with Ecology.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Archaeology (81.85%)
  • Cave (48.84%)
  • Middle Stone Age (41.91%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Archaeology (81.85%)
  • Cave (48.84%)
  • Middle Stone Age (41.91%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Archaeology, Cave, Middle Stone Age, Paleontology and Paleoanthropology. His work on Taphonomy, Later Stone Age, Mousterian and Pleistocene is typically connected to Stratigraphy as part of general Archaeology study, connecting several disciplines of science. The concepts of his Cave study are interwoven with issues in Context and Excavation.

His Howiesons Poort study in the realm of Middle Stone Age interacts with subjects such as Young child. His Paleontology research incorporates elements of Animal Shells and Bone tool. His Paleoanthropology research includes elements of Lithic technology, Mineralogy, Paleoecology and Morphometric analysis.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Did our species evolve in subdivided populations across Africa, and why does it matter? (148 citations)
  • Did our species evolve in subdivided populations across Africa, and why does it matter? (148 citations)
  • Long-distance stone transport and pigment use in the earliest Middle Stone Age (100 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Archaeology
  • Ecology
  • Paleontology

His primary areas of investigation include Cave, Archaeology, Middle Stone Age, Paleontology and Paleoanthropology. His Cave research focuses on Mousterian in particular. His work on Taphonomy, East Asia and Knapping as part of general Archaeology study is frequently linked to Hammer and Hominidae, bridging the gap between disciplines.

His Middle Stone Age research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Conus ebraeus, Homo sapiens, Bay and Animal Shells. His Paleontology research incorporates themes from Experimental Replication, Cave painting, Cave art and Osteology. His research integrates issues of Lithic technology, Debitage, Prehistory, Human evolution and Paleoecology in his study of Paleoanthropology.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Emergence of modern human behavior: Middle Stone Age engravings from South Africa.

Christopher S. Henshilwood;Francesco d'Errico;Royden Yates;Zenobia Jacobs.
Science (2002)

1074 Citations

Nassarius kraussianus shell beads from Blombos Cave: evidence for symbolic behaviour in the Middle Stone Age

Francesco d'Errico;Christopher Henshilwood;Marian Vanhaeren;Karen van Niekerk.
Journal of Human Evolution (2005)

764 Citations

Archaeological Evidence for the Emergence of Language, Symbolism, and Music–An Alternative Multidisciplinary Perspective

Francesco d'Errico;Christopher Henshilwood;Christopher Henshilwood;Graeme Lawson;Marian Vanhaeren.
Journal of World Prehistory (2003)

763 Citations

Middle Stone Age Shell Beads from South Africa

Christopher Henshilwood;Christopher Henshilwood;Francesco d'Errico;Marian Vanhaeren;Karen van Niekerk.
Science (2004)

721 Citations

Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals

Joao C Zilhao;Diego E. Angelucci;Ernestina Badal-Garcia;Francesco d'Errico.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010)

692 Citations

Neanderthal acculturation in western Europe? A critical review of the evidence and its interpretation

Francesco d'Errico;Joao Zilhão;Michèle Julien;Dominique Baffier.
Current Anthropology (1998)

675 Citations

Engraved ochres from the Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave, South Africa

Christopher S. Henshilwood;Francesco d'Errico;Francesco d'Errico;Ian Watts.
Journal of Human Evolution (2009)

626 Citations

82,000-year-old shell beads from North Africa and implications for the origins of modern human behavior

Abdeljalil Bouzouggar;Nick Barton;Marian Vanhaeren;Francesco d'Errico.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007)

620 Citations

The invisible frontier. A multiple species model for the origin of behavioral modernity

Francesco D'Errico.
Evolutionary Anthropology (2003)

619 Citations

Middle Paleolithic Shell Beads in Israel and Algeria

Marian Vanhaeren;Francesco d'Errico;Chris Stringer;Sarah L. James.
Science (2006)

585 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Francesco d'Errico

Christopher S. Henshilwood

Christopher S. Henshilwood

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Curtis W. Marean

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Ruth Blasco

Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution

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Ofer Bar-Yosef

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Andy I.R. Herries

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Richard G. Roberts

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Eudald Carbonell

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Marie-Hélène Moncel

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