H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 36 Citations 6,330 112 World Ranking 3333 National Ranking 375

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Genus
  • Insect

His main research concerns Ecology, Zoology, Bumblebee, Acromyrmex echinatior and Pollinator. His Evolutionary biology research extends to Ecology, which is thematically connected. His Zoology study frequently links to adjacent areas such as Herd immunity.

His Bumblebee research integrates issues from Bombus terrestris and Foraging. His Bombus terrestris research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Forage and Nest. His Acromyrmex echinatior research includes themes of Plant disease resistance, Mating, ANT, Metarhizium anisopliae and Host.

His most cited work include:

  • Ancestral Monogamy Shows Kin Selection Is Key to the Evolution of Eusociality (462 citations)
  • Trade-offs in group living: transmission and disease resistance in leaf-cutting ants. (214 citations)
  • GENETIC DIVERSITY AND DISEASE RESISTANCE IN LEAF-CUTTING ANT SOCIETIES (206 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Ecology, Zoology, Foraging, Acromyrmex echinatior and Host. His study looks at the relationship between Zoology and fields such as Botany, as well as how they intersect with chemical problems. His Foraging study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Animal ecology and Generalist and specialist species.

His Acromyrmex echinatior research focuses on Entomopathogenic fungus and how it connects with Metarhizium anisopliae and Metarhizium. William O. H. Hughes combines subjects such as Obligate, Competition, Resistance and Virulence with his study of Host. The Mating study combines topics in areas such as Evolutionary biology and Inclusive fitness.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (62.67%)
  • Zoology (44.00%)
  • Foraging (19.33%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Zoology (44.00%)
  • Ecology (62.67%)
  • Bumblebee (12.00%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

William O. H. Hughes mostly deals with Zoology, Ecology, Bumblebee, Foraging and Hymenoptera. His study in Zoology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Host, Honey Bees and Pollinator. His Ecology and Insect, ANT, Obligate, Phenotypic plasticity and Nest investigations all form part of his Ecology research activities.

His work investigates the relationship between Bumblebee and topics such as Bombus terrestris that intersect with problems in Nosema ceranae. The Trail pheromone research he does as part of his general Foraging study is frequently linked to other disciplines of science, such as Carcharodon, therefore creating a link between diverse domains of science. As part of one scientific family, William O. H. Hughes deals mainly with the area of Hymenoptera, narrowing it down to issues related to the Wolbachia, and often Biological dispersal, Fixation, Mating and Genetic drift.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Do managed bees drive parasite spread and emergence in wild bees (80 citations)
  • Gut microbiota composition is associated with environmental landscape in honey bees. (50 citations)
  • The effects of single and mixed infections of Apicystis bombi and deformed wing virus in Bombus terrestris (38 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Insect
  • Genus

William O. H. Hughes spends much of his time researching Zoology, Ecology, Pollinator, Honey bee and Insect. His Zoology study combines topics in areas such as Anatomy, Foraging, Juvenile hormone and Honey Bees. His Foraging research incorporates elements of Ontogeny and Nest.

His primary area of study in Ecology is in the field of Obligate. The concepts of his Honey bee study are interwoven with issues in Bombus , Pollination, Pollinator decline, Domestication and Honey production. His studies deal with areas such as Pheromone, Animal communication, Sex pheromone, Acromyrmex and Fungus-growing ants as well as Insect.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Ancestral Monogamy Shows Kin Selection Is Key to the Evolution of Eusociality

William O. H. Hughes;Benjamin P. Oldroyd;Madeleine Beekman;Francis L. W. Ratnieks.
Science (2008)

632 Citations

GENETIC DIVERSITY AND DISEASE RESISTANCE IN LEAF-CUTTING ANT SOCIETIES

William O. H. Hughes;Jacobus J. Koos Boomsma.
Evolution (2004)

275 Citations

Colony growth of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, in improved and conventional agricultural and suburban habitats

Dave Goulson;William O H Hughes;Lara C Derwent;Jane C Stout.
Oecologia (2002)

271 Citations

Trade-offs in group living: transmission and disease resistance in leaf-cutting ants.

William O. H. Hughes;Jorgen Eilenberg;Jacobus J. Koos Boomsma.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2002)

266 Citations

Can alloethism in workers of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, be explained in terms of foraging efficiency?

Dave Goulson;James Peat;Jane C Stout;James Tucker.
Animal Behaviour (2002)

234 Citations

The Trojan hives: pollinator pathogens, imported and distributed in bumblebee colonies

Peter Graystock;Kathryn Yates;Sophie E. F. Evison;Ben Darvill.
Journal of Applied Ecology (2013)

206 Citations

Worker caste polymorphism has a genetic basis in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

William O. H. Hughes;Seirian Sumner;Steven Van Borm;Jacobus J. Koos Boomsma.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2003)

204 Citations

Parasites in bloom: flowers aid dispersal and transmission of pollinator parasites within and between bee species.

Peter Graystock;Dave Goulson;William O. H. Hughes.
Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2015)

201 Citations

Emerging dangers: Deadly effects of an emergent parasite in a new pollinator host

Peter Graystock;Kathryn Yates;Ben Darvill;Dave Goulson.
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology (2013)

167 Citations

Pervasiveness of parasites in pollinators.

Sophie E. F. Evison;Katherine E. Roberts;Lynn Laurenson;Stéphane Pietravalle.
PLOS ONE (2012)

161 Citations

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Best Scientists Citing William O. H. Hughes

Jacobus J. Boomsma

Jacobus J. Boomsma

University of Copenhagen

Publications: 86

Dave Goulson

Dave Goulson

University of Sussex

Publications: 63

Mark J. F. Brown

Mark J. F. Brown

Royal Holloway University of London

Publications: 36

Patrizia d'Ettorre

Patrizia d'Ettorre

Institut Universitaire de France

Publications: 35

Guy Smagghe

Guy Smagghe

Ghent University

Publications: 29

Serge Aron

Serge Aron

Université Libre de Bruxelles

Publications: 28

Benjamin P. Oldroyd

Benjamin P. Oldroyd

University of Sydney

Publications: 27

Jürgen Heinze

Jürgen Heinze

Albert Einstein Institution

Publications: 26

Anna Dornhaus

Anna Dornhaus

University of Arizona

Publications: 24

Michel Chapuisat

Michel Chapuisat

University of Lausanne

Publications: 24

Robert J. Paxton

Robert J. Paxton

Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Publications: 24

Stuart A. West

Stuart A. West

University of Oxford

Publications: 22

Rebecca E. Irwin

Rebecca E. Irwin

North Carolina State University

Publications: 22

Juliet L. Osborne

Juliet L. Osborne

University of Exeter

Publications: 21

Mariano Higes

Mariano Higes

Servicio de Salud de Castilla La Mancha

Publications: 21

Laurent Keller

Laurent Keller

University of Lausanne

Publications: 21

Something went wrong. Please try again later.