D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Psychology D-index 34 Citations 8,344 73 World Ranking 6070 National Ranking 604

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Social psychology
  • Cognition

Melissa Bateson focuses on Social psychology, Cognitive psychology, Foraging, Cognitive bias and Statistics. In the field of Social psychology, her study on Set overlaps with subjects such as Generosity. Her study in Cognitive psychology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Biological evolution, Cognition, Developmental psychology, Punishment and Mood disorders.

The study incorporates disciplines such as Fallacy and Preference in addition to Foraging. Her Cognitive bias research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Animal-assisted therapy, Stimulus, Sturnus, Environmental enrichment and HUBzero. Her research integrates issues of Preference, Optimal foraging theory and Maximization in her study of Statistics.

Her most cited work include:

  • Cues of being watched enhance cooperation in a real-world setting (803 citations)
  • Risky Theories—The Effects of Variance on Foraging Decisions (440 citations)
  • Environmental enrichment induces optimistic cognitive bias in rats (209 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Sturnus, Social psychology, Cognitive psychology, Foraging and Ecology. Her Sturnus research incorporates elements of Developmental psychology, Brood and Starling. Her work on Honesty as part of general Social psychology study is frequently linked to Context, bridging the gap between disciplines.

Her Cognitive psychology research includes elements of Affect and Cognitive bias. Her Cognitive bias study which covers Pessimism that intersects with Punishment. In general Foraging, her work in Optimal foraging theory is often linked to Variance linking many areas of study.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Sturnus (29.08%)
  • Social psychology (19.15%)
  • Cognitive psychology (15.60%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Affect (7.80%)
  • Sturnus (29.08%)
  • Environmental health (3.55%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Melissa Bateson spends much of her time researching Affect, Sturnus, Environmental health, Cognitive psychology and Meta-analysis. In her study, Stimulus is strongly linked to Judgement, which falls under the umbrella field of Affect. Her Sturnus study incorporates themes from Evolutionary biology, Developmental psychology, Impulsivity, Starling and Local adaptation.

Her Developmental psychology research incorporates themes from Cohort and Psychological research. Her work in Impulsivity addresses subjects such as Association, which are connected to disciplines such as Statistics. The concepts of her Cognitive psychology study are interwoven with issues in Pessimism and Animal Welfare.

Between 2018 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Consequences of measurement error in qPCR telomere data: A simulation study. (20 citations)
  • Pharmacological manipulations of judgement bias: A systematic review and meta-analysis (16 citations)
  • Pacing behaviour in laboratory macaques is an unreliable indicator of acute stress. (13 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Cognition
  • Ecology

Melissa Bateson mostly deals with Demography, Attrition, Meta-analysis, Acute stress and Home cage. Her Demography studies intersect with other disciplines such as Regression toward the mean, Covariate, Baseline, Cigarette smoking and Biomarker. Melissa Bateson integrates many fields, such as Attrition, Biological age, Causal effect and Reduced longevity, in her works.

Her work deals with themes such as Judgement, Animal Welfare and Affective valence, Affect, which intersect with Meta-analysis. She combines topics linked to Audiology with her work on Acute stress.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Cues of being watched enhance cooperation in a real-world setting

Melissa Bateson;Daniel Nettle;Gilbert Roberts.
Biology Letters (2006)

1535 Citations

Risky Theories—The Effects of Variance on Foraging Decisions

Alex Kacelnik;Melissa Bateson.
Integrative and Comparative Biology (1996)

620 Citations

Effects of eye images on everyday cooperative behavior: a field experiment

Max Ernest-Jones;Daniel Nettle;Melissa Bateson.
Evolution and Human Behavior (2011)

408 Citations

Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

Melissa Bateson;Suzanne Desire;Sarah E. Gartside;Geraldine A. Wright.
Current Biology (2011)

313 Citations

Comparative evaluation and its implications for mate choice.

Melissa Bateson;Susan D. Healy.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2005)

262 Citations

Performance on a categorisation task suggests that removal of environmental enrichment induces 'pessimism' in captive European starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris )

Melissa Bateson;Stephanie Matheson.
Animal Welfare (2007)

237 Citations

The watching eyes effect in the Dictator Game: it's not how much you give, it's being seen to give something

Daniel Nettle;Zoe Harper;Adam Kidson;Rosie Stone.
Evolution and Human Behavior (2013)

232 Citations

Larger, enriched cages are associated with 'optimistic' response biases in captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

Stephanie M. Matheson;Lucy Asher;Melissa Bateson.
Applied Animal Behaviour Science (2008)

230 Citations

Environmental enrichment induces optimistic cognitive bias in rats

Nichola M. Brydges;Matthew Leach;Katie Nicol;Rebecca Wright.
Animal Behaviour (2011)

230 Citations

Risk-sensitivity: crossroads for theories of decision-making.

Alex Kacelnik;Melissa Bateson.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences (1997)

220 Citations

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Andrew N. Radford

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Michael L. Platt

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Alasdair I. Houston

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Ara Norenzayan

Ara Norenzayan

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Birger Puppe

Birger Puppe

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Daniel Nettle

Daniel Nettle

Newcastle University

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